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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    I have to admit that I didn't imagine you to be such a handsome man.
     
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  2. aglose

    aglose Senior member

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    Does anyone know a competent cobbler in Denver? I have a pair of carmina loafers that came with a broken string (string loafers) it's more of a decorative piece anyways, so I asked Betty if she could send me a replacement string and she agreed she would. I just need the string affixed to the shoe where the old one was and the old one removed. I would prefer someone in Denver, but new York is also an option.

    Thank you.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2014
  3. dbhdnhdbh

    dbhdnhdbh Senior member

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    Regarding shoe inserts. I am not a podiatrist, but there used to be several threads on AAAC frequented by such an expert. He said that people who truly need orthopedic correction need to be fitted for and have constructed real custom orthotics. He said that the vast majority of over the counter inserts were useless, unless one simply needed to take up space in the shoe- which means of course the shoe does not fit.

    Now remember that he was a podiatrist, so the people he saw had foot problems bad enough to see a doctor. There may be people with less severe complaints who self treat with retail orthotics and do just fine. If so, they would never see him, so he would not know this had happened (my speculation, as I said, I am not an expert).

    He did say that two brands of retail inserts - Superfeet and Powerstep- were of some use, even for people who got as far as a podiatrist. So if you are looking for inserts or arch supports that may be the place to start.

    Some people think they need inserts and like to coddle their feet. I assume this is true. Peronally I like very stiff supportive shoes, trying to reproduce the effect of stout hiking boots in something I can wear to the office. This is not for everyone.

    I have a firm, nonexpert, opinion that people should wear shoes they find comfortable- whether that means firm and supportive, floppy and minimalist, or anywhere in between. If your feet hurt in one kind of shoe, don't wear it. If you feet are comfortable in another, or comfortable with your special blend of inserts, then wear them in good health.
     
  4. gsgleason

    gsgleason Senior member

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    I probably wouldn't go to that cobbler.
     
  5. jssdc

    jssdc Senior member

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    ...
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
  6. Murlsquirl

    Murlsquirl Senior member Moderator

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    Does that mean you won't be visiting the store?
     
  7. Nick V.

    Nick V. Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    We have been selling and I have been wearing Powersteps for years. Customers are very happy with them. In my case I have no foot problems what so ever. I can pretty much find a good fit with almost any RTW brand. I wouldn't use Powersteps in any dress shoe nor do I need to. However with my hiking boots I remove the supports that came with them and replace them with the PS's.
    They are very comfortable and give a lot more support than the ones that came with the boots.

    When customers come in looking for the PS's they have more of a need. I always suggest (if they plan on wearing them in dress shoes) that they purchase a shoe that was designed to accept an arch support. Some makers have styles available that come with removable supports. I suggest replacing the supports with the PS's as I do in my boots. I've have had several customers that have either ankle, knee, hip or, back problems and told me the PS's do more to alleviate they're discomfort than Doctors were able to do.
    But that's different story....

    Having said that, at the end of the day I would (as you eluded) much prefer a properly fitted shoe than one that needs inserts (of any kind) to make them comfortable. However some have a need for such devices in RTW shoes in order to gain comfort. Why not use them?
     
  8. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    I think that Nick has made the important point: if devices are comfortable, why not wear them?

    On a similar note (but not one that I imagine Nick would agree with)...I have a pair of AirMax - in a much lighter shade than the ones above. They are very, very comfortable. Not all that many people would wear them to the Oscar ceremonies but they are great on planes and for just knocking around in. Now, will someone 'delete this shit?' [​IMG]
     
  9. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Because they change the shape...and fit...of the shoe?
     
  10. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Yes, fair enough, DWF.
     
  11. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Munky,

    Re-reading my post, I suspect my remark could be misunderstood or seen as cryptic.

    So...a slight correction/clarification:

    I'm not talking simply about decreasing interior volume. That does happen, as well--occasionally, rarely, for the better, but most often to the detriment of the foot.

    The real issue is that adding any kind of insert/insole into a shoe changes the insole shape; changes the relationship of the foot to the insole, and, as a result, changes the fit.

    This is the same as buying a shoe that is a half size too big in the critical heel-to-ball measurement. It's what's known as the "orange peel effect."

    Compounding all that, if the shoe was initially bought too large/long and the insert is being used to take up some surplus, you can end up with a shoe that is terrible for the long term health of the foot.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
  12. jssdc

    jssdc Senior member

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    LOL

    It's gone now so I won't have the chance (pity, of course) and will edit out my combustible post.
     
  13. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    No, I was quite happy with your other response and didn't read it as cryptic! Thanks,though, for your elaboration. I can understand the objections you have to inserts. My problem, I guess, is (apart from the one pair I have) finding shoes that really fit and that support my arches. I still find it odd that I have just the one pair that need nothing added to them. They were not expensive, either. I can't afford bespoke shoes and only run to around £250 for RTW. They are mostly Herring or Loake 1880's.I buy in a reputable shop and the staff always make every effort to make sure that everything is OK. Once I get them home and walk around in them, I start to feel a gap around the arch area and thus they don't fit.

    I don't remember having these sorts of problems when I bought any old shoes, straight of the shelf, from Clark's! Perhaps I did have these problems and didn't realise it.

    Thanks, again, for your help, DWF. As always, much appreciated.
     
  14. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Well, I don't think an arch cookie, all by itself, is near as problematic as a full length insert. Or even one that runs from the back of the heel to under the ball of the foot.

    You have to understand that manufacturers design lasts and make shoes to fit the widest range of feet they can with the smallest number of sizes.

    Lasts, in the US come in many sizes from AAA-EEE, and even widths out of that range by special order. Most manufactures seldom carry more than one or two of those widths and rely on the customer to misfit hisownself if the sizes they offer don't answer.

    But even if they did make all those widths they couldn't afford to have a run of lasts that were so extreme that they actually supported high arches. They'd lose all their low arched customers...and with the prevalence of running shoes, etc., there are many more of them than people with "normal" or high arches.

    So automatically and immediately, even with the first and most critical tool in the making of any kind of shoe--the lasts--they are forced (by the bottom line) to compromise and cater to the lowest common denominator.

    Perhaps your real problem is simply that you are being fit for length of foot and not heel to ball. The H-B measurement is much more critical than the LOF and of course that's where the arch is.

    It's also worth noting that as we age our feet get longer esp in that H-B measurement. Muscles and ligaments weaken and breakdown and the architectural structure of the foot 'settles."

    What fit you in your 20's...the size of shoe that supported your arch... isn't likely to fit you as well in your 50's.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
  15. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Thanks, again, DWF. I think that your point about ageing is an important one. I guess I could have worn just about anything in my 20's. Not so much the case in my 60's!
     
  16. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I've been putting rocks in my shoes to produce pain and suffering on account that have sinned against the Lord.
     
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  17. Nick V.

    Nick V. Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Well, I don't think an arch cookie, all by itself, is near as problematic as a full length insert.

    Sounds like thats all you need. Have you tried them?
     
  18. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    pB. Sinning against the Lord has at least made you post a better photo of yourself.
     
  19. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Naw...that's the terrible consequences of sin.
     
  20. Cleav

    Cleav Senior member Moderator

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    Those rocks ain't big enough friend!
     
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