1. Styleforum Gives - Holiday Charity Auction 11: Any Three (3) Customized Ties from Vanda Fine Clothing

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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. kwhitelaw

    kwhitelaw Distinguished Member

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    when in doubt, renoMAT [​IMG]
     


  2. jvc44

    jvc44 Senior Member

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    A Dab of water just made them worse when I tried that . I'm pretty sure the Reno made them too soft
     


  3. kentyman

    kentyman Senior Member

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    [Please pardon the cross-post from Allen Edmonds Appreciation Feed.]

    So I just took a look at my ("Dark Brown") Cognac McTavishes after my trip to Europe and realized the double butyl soles took a real beating. It seems that broken glass shards in the streets and/or pubs of Basel, Switzerland found their way into the outsole and really did a number on them. It looks like they've been through a cheese grater.

    I've since taken as much of the glass out as I could, but I wonder if there's anything I can to do the damaged sole. Perhaps AE Conditioner/Cleaner or AE Leather Lotion to replenish the dry fibers?

    Right, with glass, with flash:
    [​IMG]

    Right, with glass:
    [​IMG]

    Right, with glass, closeup:
    [​IMG]

    Left, sans glass:
    [​IMG]
     


  4. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Distinguished Member

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    I don't understand the dab of water advice.

    The point of adding water to wax, as I understand it, is to soften the material up a bit, so you can more easily fill up the pores in calf (which is grained). Shell is not grained. The only point of adding wax polish to shell (and you should only add very little) is to give it a minimal amount of protection. Adding water just means you have a bit more of a watery wax, as there's no grain to fill here.

    It's been a mystery to me why shell develops those bumps that it does when it gets wet. Ron Rider said on his blog that it's from moisture getting trapped under layers of wax, which from what I remember, is why he said you shouldn't wax your shell too heavily. My shell gets bumps regardless of how much wax is on it, and regardless of how old it is, but who knows. I do know that my shell shoes look dull after they get wet though, and the only thing that will bring out the shine again is buffing.

    If you want to shine up your shoes, just keep buffing. But adding all these products in the way you've been adding (or how it sounds like you've been adding) is probably not wise. FWIW, I doubt you've really damaged the material, given how dense it is, so you can probably "repair" the material easily.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2013


  5. jvc44

    jvc44 Senior Member

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    I hope you are correct!they are or we're super nice boots, . I am going to call Alden tomorrow see if I can learn something thanks for your help!
     


  6. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Stylish Dinosaur Dubiously Honored

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    I bull the toes and heels of my shoe shoes. You do fill the pores on regular calf with bulling, but adding water and wax to pretty much anything will make it shine up. Here's a quick crappy photo of some shell shoes I polished last night:

    [​IMG]

    But yes, wearing shell in the rain makes them look like shit.
     


  7. benhour

    benhour Senior Member

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    adding water on the wax has exact the opposite effect than make it softer!! the water by its evaporation helps wax to solidify a lot faster(cooling it faster)!! also water helps cloth move smoother and easier on the wax and make it not to stick on the cloth or the brush and raise a better shine than without it(also water brings up the solvents from the wax with the effect mentioned previously)

    cordovan is made from the leather upper the back legs of the female horse(it is thicker and harder so it can handle the friction generated by the stallion male horse )!! during the procedure the skin is fuzzed with a lot of waxes and oils at the flesh side of the hide!! pressed and fussed again some times!! so the wax is there from the start even if you havent add any wax-polish!! there is where water is trapped!!


    now about the boots with a lot of renovateur added!! it can be easily fixed especially if there is no patina on the shoes and they are solid color!! renovateur is a great product and you really need a small amount!!(by over applying renovateur and not evenly(at some spots remains some renovateur even after the rest shoe absorbed the rest amount) that extra renovateur make the water stain effect!!
     


  8. Munky

    Munky Distinguished Member

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    Is Goodyear welting not a particularly expensive aspect of shoemaking? I ask because I have three pairs of Dr Marten's shoes - which are ideal for the rough weather we get here. The were all less than £100 a pair and yet all have Goodyear welts. I had imagined that such welting was reserved for more expensive shoes. If not, why aren't more less - expensive shoes made in this way?
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2013


  9. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Distinguished Member

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    Huh, I've never seen shell get that shiny before. Good stuff.
     


  10. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Distinguished Member

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    Up to a certain point, Goodyear-welting is a more expensive aspect of shoemaking. It does take many hands and many machines, which requires many salaries and money to keep up. However, it is the quality of materials that really drives up the price in quality Goodyear-welted shoes. You can make a Goodyear-welted shoe with cheap materials and drop the cost substantially.

    Dr. Marten's are interesting. They do have a bit of a cult following, and they were in high fashion back in the early 1990's. While they do talk highly of their leathers that they use for the uppers, the rest of their components are not high quality, unfortunately. Their welts are made of PVC. Their soles are fully synthetic. Their description of how their shoes are made definitely calls them "Goodyear-welted." However, the soles are not stitched to the uppers. They seem to use an almost proprietary manufacturing method that involves stitching a PVC welt to the uppers, after the leather has been cemented to the insoles. The heavy yellow stitches are essentially the "inseam" (if you can call it that when it's on the outside of the shoe). Those yellow stitches are what is holding the welt to the upper, and it is using an extremely low number of stitches per inch. In traditionally Goodyear-welted shoes, the inseam isn't visible. Rather, it is safely protected internally, underneath the outsole. Next, the soles are fused to the PVC welt using a superheated blade which melts the sole and PVC together to form a cohesive unit. This certainly doesn't meet any traditional definitions of Goodyear-welting. http://www.dmusastore.com/t-AOIM.aspx

    I would note that their "Goodyear-welted" products are the most expensive in their line-up.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2013


  11. cbfn

    cbfn Distinguished Member

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    It's just filling in the microscopic dents in shell with wax, the same way filling up the pores in regular leather with wax results in more shine. When the surface is «completely» smooth, the rays of light bounces off in the same direction and you have a mirror.
     


  12. Munky

    Munky Distinguished Member

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    MoneyWellSpent,
    Thanks for your very useful comments about Dr Martens and Goodyear welting.
     


  13. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Distinguished Member

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    Sorry, I just edited my original post a bit to make it more thorough. Glad I could help though.
     


  14. othertravel

    othertravel Distinguished Member

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    Hey everybody,

    What's the most accurate way to measure insoles? I found some guides on the net, but want to check in with the resident shoe experts. Don't want to take a chance on sizing when I buy online.

    Thanks!
     


  15. Willin

    Willin Senior Member

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    Could someone advise if I am doing the waxing process in the correct order? Thanks.
     


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