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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. leetpuma

    leetpuma Senior member

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    Oh btw if you only use invulver I would suggest getting the spray I linked as well. Invulver only protects it does not condition. :)
     
  2. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Well, if you're not going to wear them for a time then by all means give them a light coat of conditioner...can't hurt.
     
  3. AstroTurf

    AstroTurf Active Member

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    My actions/opinions are to treat new shoes/boots as though they have been in my collection for some time.
    Cleaning and conditioning as I would normally.
    I feel that this type of treatment removes any manufacturing goo, as well as makes them more intimately mine.
    Hope this helps, Jim
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Thanks, Jim, that's helpful.
     
  5. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Why clean them? New shoes are not dirty by any standards. You could always polish them to make them yours but I don't see the points of doing any cleaning besides brushing, let alone any recommendation of using striping products like deglazer or renomat.

    Just lightly wax the welt threads and wear them.

    Or in the rare case of vintage shoes that's been sitting in inventory for decades, condition before wear.
     
    2 people like this.
  6. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    I don't know how you have come to this end. All I can do is speculate... First, the shoes don't look like dress shoes. The stitching is too coarse for one thing and the leather itself does not appear to have either a finish or a smooth and dense enough surface to actually shine. I wouldn't be surprised if the leather was oil stuffed to begin with--not meant to be shined, IOW. Second, what I'm seeing in the photos looks like Obenof's being moved around. If it is not, it is way, way too much polish perhaps mixed with Obenof. AFAIK, the Obenof is a waterproofer based on beeswax (the streaks in your photos) and mink oil? It is intended for use on oil stuffed and open grained work leathers. it is not intended for use on fine calf or kangaroo or exotics. Once you put such preparations on a shoe you play hell getting them out...good if it is indeed a work boot, not so good if not...and/or actually achieving a polish over it.
     
  7. leetpuma

    leetpuma Senior member

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    I don't know how you have come to this end. All I can do is speculate...

    First, the shoes don't look like dress shoes.
    You are correct they are wolveriene 1K mile boots. I was using these b/c I did not want to mess up my dress shoes.
    They are made of CXL leather which is an high oil leather http://horween.com/101/chromexcel-2/



    The stitching is too coarse for one thing and the leather itself does not appear to have either a finish or a smooth and dense enough surface to actually shine. I wouldn't be surprised if the leather was oil stuffed to begin with--not meant to be shined, IOW.
    I was hoping to layer and layer until I was able to get a shine.
    But you are right this is an high oil leather that probably not meant to shine
    .


    Thanks for the help, I guess I just need to try again on a non-oily leather.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2014
  8. AstroTurf

    AstroTurf Active Member

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    ^^^ I would strip them clean...
    Condition them with what Wolverine recommends.
    Then shine them to your hearts content.
    Just my opinion, Jim
     
  9. PCK1

    PCK1 Senior member

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    Step 1 - place shoe trees in shoes

    Step 2 - brush shoes

    Step 3 - lightly apply minimal wax polish to cloth and rub in circular motions throughout shoe with medium pressure

    Step 4 - let sit for 10 minutes

    Step 5 - brush shoes vigorously

    voila...polish complete
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. leetpuma

    leetpuma Senior member

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    He he. That Obenof's LP is some potent stuff.
    Adding on to that being an oily leather I think I chose the worst possible surface to practice on :(
    What are normal cleaning solutions? Renomat or Lexol Leather cleaner?

    Thanks I will try this.
     
  11. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Most people will probably have grasped this if they have spent any time on this site.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2014
  12. AstroTurf

    AstroTurf Active Member

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    ^^^ Those are but two of many products/methods for cleaning off the goo.
    Good Luck & Keep us posted.
    Jim
     
  13. leetpuma

    leetpuma Senior member

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    Lol I thought I had.
    But i think i just choose the worst possible leather surface to practice on.

    Next time i try Ill be sure to snap up a few pics.
     
  14. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    I would recommend against stripping the leather. Wear them for a few months and try to build a shine then, the levels of oils and waxes in the leather should have minimized. However, a mirror or high shine on a work boot like 1Ks look ridiculous IMO.
     
  15. leetpuma

    leetpuma Senior member

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    I was mainly practicing on those boots. B/c no matter what I screw up it just ends up being "character" on those boots :)

    But as i have figured out oily leather + obenof's LP is basically unshine-able.

    I just made a small attempt on some dress shoes from meermin and it is much better (No crazy mirror or anything. But def not what was in those pics above. That was like shoe poishing gore.)
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2014
  16. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Just out of curiosity, what would happen if you never put any product on your shoes but only brushed them before and after wearing? Would anything unpleasant happen to them?
     
  17. wurger

    wurger Senior member

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    if unpleasant things don't happen over an extended amount of time, what is the point of this entire thread?

    Surely people gets bumps and scratches, they would use some polish to cover it up, and for most people, that about as far as they go.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2014
  18. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Thank you for this, Wurger. My post wasn't linked to any other. I was just curious, given that many people advocate minimal use of shoe products.
     
  19. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    Probably dried up leather and premature cracking.
     
  20. Yowzer

    Yowzer Senior member

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    One of my favourite pairs of shoes has developed holes at the inside of the heels (due to friction). Is this considered as a standard repair by any reputable cobbler? Would the cobbler cut and remove a piece of the inner lining, and replace it with an equivalent piece? The other alternative would be to overlay and glue a new piece on which doesn't sound like a proper thing to do.
     

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