**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    How about some pictures of your AEs to school us?
     


  2. Noo Guy

    Noo Guy Member

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    I seem to be continually beating the proverbial dead horse about this basic concept, so forgive me as I ask for some basic help/ product recommendations... I have read well over 200 pages of this thread, but I apologize if this sort of thing has been covered elsewhere.

    I have two pairs of AE shoes that I want to begin polishing with wax polish in addition to my AE cream routine. They are chili and walnut in color. AE does not make those colored polishes, and I was told by an AE associate to use neutral wax on top of their cream.

    First - are there any opinions or recommendations on the approach of neutral wax over tinted creams?

    Second - does anyone use a different brand polish that can recommend a wax for those specific colors? I was reviewing the saphir color/ tint matcher, am undecided, and thought a more seasoned member could assist from experience.

    Third - (same query I posited to AE) "why would you make shoes and shoe care product, but not enough colors for some of your best selling product?" <off soapbox>

    Thank you all in advance for any help you can offer me.
     


  3. benhour

    benhour Senior member

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    1) as mister miyagi said brush on brush of!! [​IMG]

    2) i would use medium brown on walnut

    [​IMG]

    and neutral on chilli!!

    just to know if you put a lot neautral wax become somekind like dust efect where the she creases after some walk!!

    hope you ll be ok with these!!
     


  4. David Copeland

    David Copeland Senior member

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    I suggest using a Chili Cream and Wax in the Saphir Brand and not relying on a neutral wax, as well as the other color, Walnut - in both the Saphir Match.

    Buying sight unseen can be a waste of time unless you have the COLOR GUIDE for Saphir Colors right in front of you, positioned right over your shoes for a near exact color match.

    Here are the details for the color guide:

    [​IMG]

    As you can see from the image above, this hard copy color guide has small holes in each of the Saphir colors - to permit you to place the hole of the color over your shoe for a match.

    Brown comes in many shades, and I would only recommend the guide - although some of have the same shoes and colors and we can post what has worked for us.

    If you want a link to an online store to purchase the guide, let me know.

    All my best,

    David
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2013


  5. MrDV

    MrDV Senior member

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    hello everyone, long time listener - first time caller.
    just bought these used leather aldens. any advice on how to remove the stains or even out the color? I am open to alden restoration or b.nelson, but would like to know if anyone would try something else first/instead. I already tried lexol, saphir renovator, kiwi wax. the leather is now conditioned, shiny, and protected but the spots remain a problem. do any of you have any shoe care shop recommendations in the san diego area? i have tried 4 in the past, and have not been impressed. thanks in advance for your advice.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     


  6. benhour

    benhour Senior member

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    david can you please read carefully what he is asking for?? and then answer!!!
    have you ever seen this collor guide in reality? this color guide has all products of saphir in there !!!
    in pate de luxe(wax) there are only 3 shades of brown!! light -medium-dark and the redish mahogany!! All the other shades are for cream!
    if you want i can send it to you or download it from here http://www.hangerproject.com/images/Saphir-Nauncer-Color-Card-High-Res.jpg
    Do you know the origine of the spots?(or if it is possible to ask the previous owner)!! if they are water-salt stains it is quite easy to clean them!!
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2013


  7. BootSpell

    BootSpell Senior member

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    I have a similar request for input as MrDV. These are my #8 Alden x J.Crew PCT boots. Got them new and they're now about 8 months old and truthfully, haven't been cared for very much other than a couple of Reno treatments every few months. They've lightened up considerably since I got them and I have now just noticed this dark spot on the vamp of the left boot. I am 99% sure I haven't spilled oil or anything on them. I think the spot gradually appeared as the boots lightened. It's almost like it was a dye stain that was covered with the finishing that Alden performed.

    IRL the spot/stain is not that noticeable as in these pics. Can anyone suggest what I can do to get rid of it? I'm not much of a wax fan and rarely use anything other than Reno or VC on any of my footwear. But I will on these if it will help.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     


  8. benhour

    benhour Senior member

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    a friend of mine gave me his shoes for some treatment(he have seen some pics of my shoes in my mobile and we took a bet if i can make them look good) so i thought taking some pics!! i know this pair is not at the SF standards but i think a before-after is OK as we are in the shoe care section!! the good thing is that they are not corrected grane!

    before: left and right shoe
    [​IMG][​IMG]



    [​IMG][​IMG]



    [​IMG][​IMG]

    after:
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]


    all process took about 40 minutes!(clean-nourishing- recoloring sole edges -wax sole edges-shine-mirror shine toes(not as usual cause i was bored to death hahahhah))
    hope you like the outcome!! All thoughts are more than welcome!![​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2013




  9. masernaut

    masernaut Senior member

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    thats great work Benhour.
     


  10. MrDV

    MrDV Senior member

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    i bought them from an ebay flipper. most likely came from a second hand store, he'll have no clue to the origin. alden doesn't make this style anymore, therefore i would love to bring these back to respectable condition. the folks from the alden thread recommended brush and then brush some more. how would you clean water-salt stains. thanks again.
     


  11. cathpah

    cathpah Senior member

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    This thread seems to be full of beautiful shoes, but I was wondering if you could help me with a pair of boots. I own the Red Wing Beckmans in (the now discontinued) chestnut color, which is a light brown. While I know boots of that nature generally look just as good if not better once they're a bit beat up, I'm a bit bothered by how mine look right now. I wore them a few times, including to a Boston Bruins game where they got pretty scuffed up. I was able to get rid of most marks by brushing, but the toe had a large mark on it that wouldn't come off. I then used saddle soap to take it off (which worked pretty well). When doing so, I realized that I had yet to treat the boots, so I then put on a coat of Obenaufs for future protection. To my surprise (and happiness) the Obenaufs didn't really darken the overall color of the boot at all, however the area that I'd worked on with saddle soap darkened a lot. It's now been a few days, and it hasn't really lightened up at all. Again, while I'm happy with some scrapes/dings/character, the boots just look very different because of the large dark spot on the toe, so I'm hoping to find a way to even them out a bit. Generally speaking, for lighter colored leathers like this on my shoes, I just use a neutral polish...but that obviously won't lighten a big dark spot like this. What would you recommend I do/use to help remedy the situation?

    Thanks in advance.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     


  12. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    This does not look like a water stain to me but rather some chemical (like alcohol that dripped on the shoe and wasn't removed) that damaged the leather finish slightly. I would probably scrub the shoes down with RenoMat to see if you could remove or blend out the damage. Then condition and polish the shoes. Do both shoes to keep everything even.
     


  13. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    I don't think you will like my answer, but it looks like you scrubbed the toe of the left boot (right side in the picture) too hard and scuffed the leather surface. The scuff opens the leather grain and allow the oils from the Obenaufs to be absorbed more readily in that spot than other areas of the boot. I really don't know of a way to fix the problem, but perhaps someone else has a better idea (or a different opinion).
     


  14. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    That is some very nice work benhour.
     


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