Dismiss Notice

STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. wurger

    wurger Senior member

    Messages:
    2,887
    Likes Received:
    1,231
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2011
    Location:
    Sydney

    Thanks for the informative post.
     


  2. friteuseur

    friteuseur Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2013
    Hi,
    I did post this question in the "quick question/answer" thread first, but it's more appropriate here, I think.

    Having recently purchased the attached pair of shoes, I have a few questions regarding proper maintenance, as this is my first couple of cognac or brown colored shoes, actually.

    I would like to make sure to maintain the overall relatively bright color of the shoe for now, so I'm thinking a light brown or light tan wax polish would do, as long as it's not darker than the current color. Would this maintain the current finish, including the somewhat darker tip? Alternatively, I could probably use a somewhat darker brown for the front part..
    Does that sound about right?

    And secondly, I do like the black contrasting part in the back and the stitches in gerenal. What's the best way to take care of these areas without applying any of the brown color here? Use some neutral polish around these areas? Just being very careful around these areas when applying a light tan polish? Or rather leave them as they are without polishing these spots?

    Many thanks for your advice on these rather novice questions!


    [​IMG]
     


  3. wurger

    wurger Senior member

    Messages:
    2,887
    Likes Received:
    1,231
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2011
    Location:
    Sydney
    You can just use a lighter polish or neutral polish for your shoes, they will not affect the coloring, and the black bits.
     


  4. meister

    meister Senior member

    Messages:
    7,649
    Likes Received:
    771
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    That is a very nicely shaped shoe and a colour I particularly like.

    You might find that the shoe antiques itself with application of cream/polish over time.

    If you want to maintain the colour light tan/neutral is the go.

    For instance I have use Saphir, Angelus and Kiwi waxes/creams on a pair of C&J Clifford hand grades and they have progressively antiqued themselves in a variety of areas.
     


  5. Munky

    Munky Senior member

    Messages:
    1,698
    Likes Received:
    465
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Location:
    Wales, UK
    If it is impossible to get shoe trees that fit snugly, is it better to use a looser tree or a tighter one? A tight shoe tree seems likely to do damage to the back of the shoe, over time. In my experience, shoe trees can vary from their description in the way that some shoes can vary in their stated size.
     


  6. wurger

    wurger Senior member

    Messages:
    2,887
    Likes Received:
    1,231
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2011
    Location:
    Sydney
    

    Shoe trees come in sizes, however, should always go down half a size if the exact sizing isn't available. For example, my Trickers are 6.5, I got Trickers 6 shoe trees since they don't come in half sizes. This is confirmed by Pediwear staff too.
     


  7. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Likes Received:
    1,106
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    

    Depends. Bespoke trees fits fairly tightly. Not so much RTW.

    Find trees that have shape of your feet would be the best option IMO. Don't worry about destroying heels if you can put them into your shoes easily. Its very hard or improbable to stretch shoes in length. Besides, your heel reinforcements are most likely heat formed plastic and can sustain abuse.
     


  8. Munky

    Munky Senior member

    Messages:
    1,698
    Likes Received:
    465
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Location:
    Wales, UK
    Thanks wurger and Chogall

    Chogall, is there a typo in your response? Should it have read ":Don't worry about destroying heels if you can't put them into your shoes easily?"

    Thanks, Munky.
     


  9. laufer

    laufer Senior member

    Messages:
    3,426
    Likes Received:
    393
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2008
    I thought I post this from the interview with Dean Girling and Tony Gaziano. What shoemakers think you should do to care about shoes. This was short but wonderful read. Italics are mine :)


    "I would say try and avoid bad weather with leather soles, if you get your shoes soaking wet, let them dry naturally with some news paper inside to absorb, and then put the trees in when they dry of a little. If you put the trees in straight away they will never absorb a great deal of moisture as the wood is not that porous. Give them a wax polish every 2 or 3 times you wear them, after a few months of wax polish remove the wax using a mild cleaner and then apply a good shoe cream, leave them for a while to absorb the cream ( maybe overnight) and then start applying the wax polish again. Other than that, simply check the wear of the soles regulary so that they are not wearing too thin. If the sole is very thin, then return them to the original maker for re-soling and renovation."


    http://www.keikari.com/english/interview-with-tony-gaziano-and-dean-girling/
     


  10. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,504
    Likes Received:
    8,866
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    Avoiding bad weather in New York and London is incredibly hard and not really worth the effort. Here in New York our forecast changes so frequently and in the summer time there is always a chance of a random downpour that can leave you drenched. Just not realistic unless you are driving everywhere and your feet barely touch pavement.
     


  11. laufer

    laufer Senior member

    Messages:
    3,426
    Likes Received:
    393
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2008
    

    I know what New York weather is like I live in New England :). That's why there are other options such as rubber soles.
     


  12. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,504
    Likes Received:
    8,866
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    Soles are the least of my concern. They can be replaced easily. The uppers is what I worry about. Plus, rubber soles like dianite are shit in wet weather. I've slipped and slided all over in them. Oak Bark gets a nap on it and I've always had better traction with them. Plus, after a good rain I treat them with some obaneuf's. Also, rubber soles simply look like shit, imo.
     


  13. clee1982

    clee1982 Senior member

    Messages:
    8,710
    Likes Received:
    513
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2009
    Location:
    New York City, NY, USA


  14. Munky

    Munky Senior member

    Messages:
    1,698
    Likes Received:
    465
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Location:
    Wales, UK
    One last shoe tree question. If trees are made by the company who made the shoes, can those trees be relied upon to fit the company's shoes? I have bought Loakes shoe trees (size 8.5 to 10) for my size 9 Loake shoes. The trees go in reasonably easily but take a good bit of getting out. It occurs to me that this may be because the trees have very small 'handles'. Should I rely on the company to supply appropriate trees for their shoes?
     


  15. SuitedDx

    SuitedDx Senior member

    Messages:
    4,727
    Likes Received:
    850
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Location:
    The Forum
    

    I agree it's usually the uppers that I'm worried about. I just carry overshoes when there is >30%. The flash showers don't really bother me when it comes to sole wear as much; however, when I know it's supposed to rain all day, I switch to Dainite (don't have the slipping problems though).
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by