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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

    Messages:
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    Oct 4, 2012
    Thanks for the response, as always!

    I use Fiebing's Saddle Soap Paste: http://www.fiebing.com/catalogue/soaps-oils/?product=97 Not because I'm loyal to it, but simply because it's what my nearest cobbler carried way back when I bought it. I use a wet natural sea sponge to work up a lather and apply it. Once it's dry, I wipe with a cloth and then buff with a brush. Like I said, it's really just one particular belt that I regularly use it on (a thick, heavy, casual leather belt that is usually worn with jeans). I have a pair of saddle shoes that I used it on for a while, made from Horween's Dublin leather, but I quit because I didn't like the build-up that started developing around the stitches. However, that was happening by following the instructions on the back of the tin, which doesn't say to rinse off the leather.

    If I ever have cause to use it on them again, I'll certainly make sure I rinse it better, and I'll do the same with my belt.

    One follow up question to your response above. Do you always recommend conditioning while the leather is still wet? How about in the case of shoes that get saturated in a downpour? Most of the information you find out there recommends letting them dry in the standard method (on their sides, away from heat, stuffed with newspaper, etc.) and then conditioning/polishing after they have thoroughly dried. It actually makes perfect sense to me that conditioning them while wet would keep the fibers properly lubricated while the water evaporates. But again, that's not what you generally find recommended "out there." Not saying I believe everything I read, of course.
     
  2. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

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    Ah, it seems my question was answered while I was typing.
     
  3. Murph65

    Murph65 Member

    Messages:
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    Sep 13, 2012
    I've decided to go with this approach on the shell Daltons, maybe trying to darken the light one up a bit at some point.

    In the meantime, given that I live in snowy NJ and work in NYC, I'd like to apply a sole protector of some sort. Wouldn't be adverse to dressing them down a little with a minilug.

    Any recommendations?
     
  4. Itsuo

    Itsuo Senior member

    Messages:
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    Oct 2, 2012
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Just picked up a deep gouge on the toe during their maiden voyage, heartbreaking but I guess it's nothing that can't be waxed to high polish and chalked up as character:brick:

    Luckily they're fairly dark so I'm likely to be the only one that ever notices.

    Any other recommendations?
     
  5. PCK1

    PCK1 Senior member

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    NY
    I'm pretty sure some good quality cream/wax to match that color (rioja it looks like?) will cover that up and will hardly be noticeable.
     
  6. goosedog

    goosedog Member

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    Sep 17, 2013
    Location:
    Toronto
    hey gang, I'm a total noob sorry to bother you all.
    I got a pair of m.a+ staple boots in camel leather ( I don't think it's reverse ) about 5 months ago and I love them and want them to age nicely with a patina, etc. not looking for a mirror shine or anything (they're actually already fairly rough and super badass looking) but I do wonder if there are any steps I can take or products I can use to ensure they last as long as possible. I live in Toronto, Canada and of course I try to keep them out of the salt and slush. Any storage tips or products you can recommend would be greatly appreciated. I just don't want them to crack or warp or anything.
    I'm also aware the best thing for them might be to do nothing at all ( lots of people have told me this already ) but I'm finding it hard to resist baby-ing them hah.
    Thanks!
    G
     
  7. goosedog

    goosedog Member

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    Sep 17, 2013
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    Toronto
    [​IMG]
    these are the m.a+ boots I was talking about. Cheers.
     
  8. wurger

    wurger Senior member

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    Itsuo, it will be pretty easy to cover up, I reckon 2 layers of cream and 2 layers of polish would do it.
     
  9. jungleroller

    jungleroller Senior member

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    Location:
    Chicago
    Carmina Austerity Brogues

    I understand burnishing finishes and antiquing but I think these got left on the wheel for a little too long. They look gorgeous despite this side and I may try some cleaner and coats of polish to work it out vs sending them back. Any suggestions or is this look normal?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  10. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Whole cut ankle boots! Nice.
     
  11. NickCarraway

    NickCarraway Senior member

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    Jan 25, 2014
    Not shoe care per se, but can anyone tell me what is causing these creases in my AE Strands? These pictures are of the interior edges of the shoes right at the balls of the feet:

    Right shoe:

    [​IMG]

    Left shoe:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. BillP

    BillP Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Colorado
    Sorry for this obvious question - are you using shoe trees?
     
  13. NickCarraway

    NickCarraway Senior member

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    Yes. The Woodlore ones from Nordstrom Rack, in the appropriate size.
     
  14. BCer

    BCer Senior member

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    Feb 9, 2013
    Location:
    Left Coast of Canada
    Question guys: A week or so ago, I took a pretty good stumble coming up the outdoor stairs to the plaza of our building. In the process, I scuffed the pristine toe of my AE Bayfields. Brushed it good, rubbed with some lotion to get moisture back in and have now put some brown polish on. Abrasion seems gone, but I have a dark halo sort of ring on the toe. Any ideas? I'm debating rubbing the whole toecap with black paste wax to darken the whole area on both toes. Ideas?
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  15. PCK1

    PCK1 Senior member

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    Me personally, I'd take that to a quality cobbler and have them deal with it.
     
  16. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Senior member

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    Los Angeles
    [​IMG]

    Sole of shoe, open channel. Thread loose//ripped due to normal walking. Is this okay? Or should I superglue it down?
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2014
  17. Nick V.

    Nick V. Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
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    Never use super-glue on leather. It dries it out and prevents it from being flexible. This most likely will cause the leather to crack.
    That sole is stitched with a lock stitch. Lock stitches are independent of each other meaning the stitching won't unravel like pulling a loose thread off a button.
    Your best bet is to burn the loose ends of the stitching (just briefly) with a match. Continue wearing them and keep an eye on the sole separating from the welt. If that happens bring them to a competent cobbler.
     
    2 people like this.
  18. Joshua Lee

    Joshua Lee Senior member

    Messages:
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    Mar 27, 2012
    Do you happen to have flat feet? I actually have the very same issue on a pair of Enzo Bonafe chukka boots, the problem for my pair seems to be the volume in the lacing area is too much, so I have to tie them a bit tighter than normal. I think if I added a pad or an additional insole it would correct the problem.
     
  19. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    Can be an indication that the shoes are too wide for you or too short for you. Not all shoes are created equal; not all feet are created equal.

    Compare two lasts used to create a size 10C shoe...both can measure x number of inches around at the "joint" (ball joint) but be very different widths across the tread line. So the insole ends up being wider than your footprint.

    Two feet that measure 11 inches long can have very different measurements from the back of the heel to the joint. IOW, some people have long toes, some have short toes.This heel-to-ball measurement is actually more important than length of foot. If you have a longer H-B measurement than the shoe, that pucker/crease will develop behind your medial ball joint nearly every time.

    FWIW...I have flat feet and do not have this problem on any of my shoes.

    --
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  20. Itsuo

    Itsuo Senior member

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    Good point. I'm using black wax on the burnished toe so hopefully that will do the trick, thanks!
     

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