**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    You see that happening? More domestic shoe manufacturering in the US? :confused:
     


  2. clee1982

    clee1982 Senior member

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    More quality domestic dress shoe manufactures here in the US? I doubt so. If you mean more one piece (no needle work, so no humans!) Nike brought back to be made in the US with robots and like 5 people in the entire factory, yes.
     


  3. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    There are numbers of US bespoke shoes and bookmakers at very reasonable prices. Some new some old. But I don't think we will see much mass manufacturing coming back here.
     


  4. lukejackson

    lukejackson Senior member

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    Hi guys,

    I recently got these on ebay. I get the feeling Bally doesn't get a great rap around here, but I personally just liked the style and it is very hard to find nice loafers in Australia, let alone ones that are somewhat affordable for a student. The photo doesn't show the extent, but the hardware on the shoe is fairly burnished. It's about time I got burnt buying off ebay as I've had some amazing buys lately.

    Is there any solution to burnished metal? I know this isn't really a 'shoe' specialty...Just metal polish? I'm also concerned using anything like this will damage the leather. On another note, are Ballys considered not particularly good due simply to construction etc.? Apologies, but I don't know much about shoes.
    [​IMG]
     


  5. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    Just bought a pair of light brown A & E LaSalle, applied Saphir Medaille D'or Light Brown No 3. The leather soaked that shit up, and almost instantly darkened it was like applying water, the colour change lightened as the wax dried but now the shoes are more brown than light brown. I've used the same paste on other light brown shoes without noticeable darkening. So what's happening here? The shoes look fine and the brown colour is not bad, just not what I wanted. Any suggested fixes?
     


  6. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    Brasso, or autosol. Slide a rag or piece of kitchen paper under the hardware so you don't get any on the leather, you don't need to use much. Let it sit for a couple of minutes and then brush off with a tooth brush and then rub with a clean rag.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2013


  7. benhour

    benhour Senior member

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    i asume you bought the chili burnished color!! i would use some cleaner-conditioner like Lexol -Renovateur-1909 leather cream and rubb jently the shoe with a cotton cloth!! i think this ll take some of the color of the Saphir polish out!! if this wont help i think you ll have to use something more drastic like renomat!! first try it on hidden area cause there is always a chanse renomat to strip out the factory finish in some point if it is water based(plants or from some natural tanning process)!
     


  8. JermynStreet

    JermynStreet Senior member

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    I do see it happening. Allen Edmonds has grown by 250 workers in the last 2 years. J & M has an American made shoe line. Sebago now has made in America shoes. Eastland is selling more made in the U.S. I think it's like anything, growth in these types of sectors starts at the top and trickles down. For now, only bespoke shoemakers will be here, but as more and more demand grows for American made goods, manufacturers will expand to meet the increased quantity demanded. Compounding that growth, just look at AE's China growth strategy. The Chinese are breaking down the walls for American made goods (especially clothing), so increased demand from abroad will too stimulate growth here. Furthermore, just as a knee-jerk test, I bet that if everyone was asked on this thread where they would prefer their shoes to come from, most would say America (all things being equal).

    I'll edit my reply later with a few links to show the demand for American made goods is back. It's not just shoes either, a lot of shirts, suits and accessories are being made here, too.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2013


  9. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    Thanks for the post, I think I might live with the colour as is.

    Yes they are Chilli, not sure why they call it that, there doesn't seem to be anything reddish or greenish about the colour.
     


  10. clee1982

    clee1982 Senior member

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    http://www.economist.com/news/busin...alys-manufacturing-successes-dropped-stitches

    “Within a generation the ‘Made in Italy’ label may be gone,” frets Ermanno Scervino, a leading designer (one of his latest confections is pictured). Having survived the country’s economic crisis relatively unscathed, Italian fashion, which generates a sizeable trade surplus, is contemplating its own extinction, simply because it is proving so hard to persuade young Italians to join the industry.

    250 is a drop in the bucket. Pretty sure most younger generations are not interested in the traditional apprenticeship in shoes/suits/clothing these days. Learning a trade (electrician for example) probably still pays more, and you can learn it quicker, plus education for a trade in those area are definitely more prevalent. I am not doubting some manufacturing is moving back to America, it is, especially given cheaper energy price in the US, but it will be more limited to highly automated process.

    p.s. I don't care if shoes are made in America, I care about quality, but I am not "American"...,
     


  11. JermynStreet

    JermynStreet Senior member

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    I agree that 250 is a drop in the bucket, but it was not meant to be an absolute measure; I said it to illustrate the point that American companies are hiring American and consumers are paying more for American.

    Here's an article to look at, also. Respectfully, I believe the job and growth numbers tell a different story that yours about "Made in America" clothing production.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390443389604578024664258741142.html

    "Even a company as big as Brooks Brothers, with approximately 125 stores nationwide, is now making all of its ties, as well as its luxury, made-to-measure and Black Fleece shirts, domestically. When Italian businessman Claudio Del Vecchio purchased the venerable purveyor of prep in 2001, he personally oversaw the safeguarding of two factories—one making shirts in North Carolina, the other making ties in Long Island City, N.Y.—that were destined to be closed. "I grew up in a factory, and I was familiar with manufacturing. I saw the potential," Mr. Del Vecchio said.
    Under Mr. Del Vecchio's supervision as CEO and chairman, Brooks Brothers purchased an additional factory, called Southwick Clothing, in Haverhill, Mass. The brand now produces 80% of its suits there. "You can't compete with imports when the cost is higher and the quality is lower," said Mr. Del Vecchio. "But I felt that if we could increase the quality, we could compete not only against the Asian manufacturers, but also with the Europeans."
     


  12. easy_golfing

    easy_golfing Senior member

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    for anybody, especially patrickb, do you think / have you found shell will be more durable than calf? I'm assuming yes, but do you think it is as durable as people say? especially longevity wise?
     


  13. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Made in America is certainly a thing these days, especially after the recession where the average american boobs realized the value of keeping money in this country, but I think it is unsustainable. Like clee said about competing trades. Also, with unions those jobs will always have higher demand for a lot of reasons, but at the same time unions aren't great for competition because their services are generally more expensive, which is what makes products from other countries more attractive.

    easy golfing, yes shell is much stronger than calf. It is highly non-porus and doesn't absorb rain and a lot of the other garbage we put on its surface, this is why it takes 6 months to tan it. The oils and waxes need a lot of time to soak in. Furthermore, it is a muscle-y skin, not just a skin which bends more than creases, so cracking is harder to come by. Also, since it doesn't crease hard like calf dirt and debris doesn't get into the crease and act like micro-sandpaper. Tons of people are walking around with vintage shell shoes. One of our most senior members here Manton has had a pair of shell shoes since he was in college, which I am guessing was about 20 years ago.

    Another thing that I like about shell is the easy maintenance of it. It really only needs a good brushing to get its luster back and remove scuffs. Conditioning only once and a while and some wax once in a while. It leaves you with more time and less processes which some people love, but I personally find daunting.
     


  14. NeedStyleHelp

    NeedStyleHelp Senior member

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    I remember seeing some good posts about caring for new shoes before you wear them, but I can't find them in searches now [​IMG]

    Basically, I did these steps for my burgundy and dark brown shoes:

    1. Cleaned shoes with damp cloth
    2. Applied saphir rennovateur with chamois all over in a circular motion (Read later that fingers are best)
    3. Waited 3-4 minutes, then brushed off with horse hair brush
    4. Applied a neutral saphir MDO all over with chamois
    5. waited 3-4 minutes then brushed off with horse hair brush
    6. repeated this step two more times. then used a chamois to buff it out in the end to get a matte patina

    Does anything sound off?
    Should I have added something in?
    What are your thoughts on the neutral saphir MDO?
    BTW, they were both bleeding color. That's to be expected, right?

    I really appreciate your help. Reading this thread has been fun, confusing and everything in between
     


  15. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Sounds like too much if you ask me.
     


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