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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Toe taps in my opinion are a must. The toe area of the shoe generally wears down pretty fast with walking and depending on your gait and wear down to the welt and thin out the welt. This leads to much more expensive and complicated repair job. I think it is worth getting the flush metal taps on the toes if your cobbler offers them. As for heels, I used to swear by them, however I have noticed that with better shoes (read $1,000+) the heels are made much better and don't wear down nearly as fast. Generally, by the time they wear down significantly it is time to replace the whole sole anyway. I have really noticed that JR heels, or Bakers heels, even the rubber inserts are of much better quality that what comes on a lot of stock RTW shoes.


    Well, kind of. With some good know-how you can improve the look of the finish of your lower priced shoes, however you are not going to trick any style conscious shoe guy. There are other things you simply cannot polish away such as an ugly last and ugly welts and such.


    I would say it is something that should be discussed with your cobbler, they should be able to recommend and help you make the proper decision.
     
  2. tv2177

    tv2177 Senior member

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    ya i m thinking just what you are saying, taking my marlow's to the cobbler when i go down to NYC next week to get a metal taps on the toes and some plastic on the heels. hope they won't cost me too much. i plan on going to b.nelson for that.
     
  3. Winston S.

    Winston S. Senior member

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    I don't remember exactly but Topy's and flush metal toe taps cost me somewhere in the range of $75 - $90 at b. nelson when I got them done 3 months ago.
     
  4. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Don't get topy's.
     
  5. tv2177

    tv2177 Senior member

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    $75 to $90 for a pair. dang!

    I googled and found this topic about Topys on AAAC

    Link
     
  6. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    /topytalk
     
  7. Winston S.

    Winston S. Senior member

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    Meh. It's been long debated and I don't believe the whole thing about them ruining leather soles. That's that as far as I am concerned.
     
  8. nutcracker

    nutcracker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    wow, this is one rare occasion that something is cheaper in Japan (flush metal top taps are around $50 or so)
     
  9. Winston S.

    Winston S. Senior member

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    I think the breakdown might have been $35 for Topy and $40 for flush metal toe taps. Somewhere in that range, so maybe it was $75.
     
  10. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    right, it has no class, though.
     
  11. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    :fistbump:
     
  12. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    add the topys and you're there. fifty is a massive rip off, though.
     
  13. nutcracker

    nutcracker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    lolol yeah, what was I thinking.......almost thought I had a good deal getting my shoes done in Japan :plain:
     
  14. tv2177

    tv2177 Senior member

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    oh boy, u are the very first person that I see on SF who is from my home town, taipei!
     
  15. SHS

    SHS Senior member

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  16. blsing

    blsing Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys, I have a few Allen Edmonds, and I am a short heavy guy, which makes my walking pretty heavy, and I pound the pavement. My cobbler has convinced me in the past to get soleguards on the front of my leather-soled shoes, and so far they have done pretty well. I also got the plastic heel taps, so they dont make too much noise when I walk, and also so it doesnt void the AE recrafting policy. The soleguards dont bother me looks-wise, even though I know the "purists" would disagree. Do people have other objections to putting Vibrams and plastic taps on shoes? Do they seem to be a good idea to lengthen the life of the shoe? It costs me about $40 for each pair of shoes...
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2011
  17. shalako

    shalako Member

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    Hello,
    Over the past few days I read this whole thread. Great stuff! Thank you all for sharing.

    I have the following questions.

    Many here advocate Renovateur for regular use. My understanding is this product is a cleaner/conditioner, and essentially strips the shoe. Isnt it bad for the leather to treat it this way regularly? With what frequency are folks using this product?

    How does your maintenance routine differ for:
    After each wearing
    Once/week
    Once/month

    Does the AE Cleaner/Conditioner serve the same purpose as Renovateur?

    It was suggested by the clerk at AE that I not use the Cleaner/Conditioner with my regular routine; he suggested instead their Leather Lotion for regular use. Will the AE Leather Lotion product condition without stripping? If you recommend using Cleaner/Conditioner regularly instead of the lotion, why?

    For shoes which are fairly new and don't need to be stripped or overhauled, would the following be a reasonable weekly/monthly routine?
    1. clean with brush and damp cloth
    2. lotion, brush, buff
    3. cream polish, brush, buff
    4. wax polish on toes and heel, brush, buff, bull

    It is still not clear to me whether both cream and wax polish are necessary. One provides color, one provides shine. Some use one or the other, some both.

    Is brushing and buffing recommended after applying each product? When/why choose one or the other?

    Thank you very much!
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2011
  18. Gdot

    Gdot Senior member

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  19. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    Hi Shalako

    There are so many possible variations on the same theme. It's really about experiencing everything for yourself: making your own mistakes, judging for yourself how much/little to add, how long to leave to dry, what product goes on nicely etc. What I'm trying to say is, just immerse yourself in getting dirty hands. The fact that you already regularly maintain your shoes, will keep them looking better than 99% on the street. Unless you start applying overly thick coats, leading to heavy buildup and cracking, you're unlikely to completely bugger it up.

    After a couple of months, think about fine tuning. Many want to fine tune from the word go. Unless you've served your 'apprenticeship', you'll probably be unsatisfied and even more confused. Once you've figured it out, it'll all be second nature. It'll be your method.

    This is honestly the best advice I can give.

    Lear
     
    1 person likes this.
  20. NotClever

    NotClever Senior member

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    I'd just use a conditioner or leather dressing on a rough leather like that. You're right that they're not meant to be shiny. I'm not an expert by any means, but it seems to me it would be difficult if not impossible to polish them to a shine even if you wanted.
     

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