**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Search for Sysdoc. He has done a lot of amazing patina from last decade. Or Ron Rider.

    Its always fun to try on cheap shoes!!
     


  2. David Copeland

    David Copeland Senior member

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    Well, I see that one of the Three Amigos chose to pull the nuke lever and achieved the deletion of a personal expression of fair discourse of other methods of shining shoes - no matter who the author or source is. No tears here, as I will move on with the following:

    In case those with Shell shoes missed it, the following is quoted from this thread:

    [​IMG]
    "My technique for both of these pairs of shoes is very simple. I wipe with a just every so slightly moist cotton cloth, and follow by applying the Renovateur with a horse hair dauber. The product goes everywhere on the upper. I let it dry for 3-5 minutes or so, and then brush it out with a horse hair brush. To achieve slightly more shine, I use a polishing cloth (the $3 ones from Allen Edmonds work great) for 20-25 seconds all around the shoe."

    The original author's photo shows he removed the laces prior to polishing . . . something a few of us have elected to do to nourish the under-garments of our shoes.

    David
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2013


  3. phantom_lord

    phantom_lord Member

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    How often should saphir renovateur be used?

    At the moment I clean and polish weekly, and then monthly do a full renovateur/polish/wax. I only tend to wear any pair once a week,
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2013


  4. David Copeland

    David Copeland Senior member

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    If I have not posted a previous welcome to you . . . I apologize for that.

    I use the following two web sites to choose how to use the Saphir products, whether it be a 3-step, 4-step, or 5-step solution to your needs. They are both excellent resources:

    Hanger Project Link

    Sid Mashburn Link

    All my best,

    David
     


  5. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I'd use it one every few weeks. A good horsehair brushing is all that it is needed in between conditioning applications.
     


  6. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    The shine on the toe of that black shoe is fantastic, great job. As for the Berluti shoes: I think their Club model is a great basic wholecut, but I'm not fond in the least of the frankinshoes they make with the obtrusive stitching. To each his own I guess. If I were going to experiment with creating a unique patina I would want to start with a basic wholecut or a simple cap toe that allows the patina to be noticed, rather than being obscured by a gaping wound, that looks like a reject from Crat's cellar experiments. But, of course, that is just my personal opinion.:)
     


  7. benhour

    benhour Senior member

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    thank you Glen i am really happy to hear that from you!!

    i am just thinking of these shoes cause i found them really cheap( 260$) in a condition like brand new and i think it ll come out well with the 2 basic+shadows colors!! i get your point of view and i agree that in a basic wholecut the patina ll take all the glory and not the unique characteristic of the shoe( to say the truth i like that stitching hahahahaha [​IMG]) but definitely i ll think about it!!

    phantom_lord
    i ll agree with PatrickBOOTH !! i think once every 3-4 weeks is a great way to keep your shoes in great condition!!
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2013


  8. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

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  9. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Septiene Largeur sell unfinished crust leather shoes for home painting/coloring sessions. I think.
     


  10. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    Like many of the members in this forum that can put a mirror shine on the toe of a shoe, I have tried a number of different polishing techniques. As has been stated before, shoe polishing is more of an art than a science. It is actually more about feel and technique than anything else.

    There are a few basics however: 1) Only use a little water at a time, 2) Only use a little polish at a time, and 3) Get a feel for the smoothness of the wax as you polish.

    To that end, when using a cotton cloth, I use what I refer to as the Two Finger Technique (I’m probably not the first, or the only person, to use this technique however):

    1) I wrap a cotton cloth (old t-shirt) around my first two fingers.

    2) I get the tips of both fingers wet through the cloth (I use a spray bottle on mist, but tapping in a tin of water would also work).

    3) I lightly rub the middle finger in the polish I am going to use, just enough to cover the tip of the finger.

    4) I begin to rub the polish onto the toe of the shoe with just the middle finger (index finger slightly raised and pressed against the middle finger for support).

    5) If I need to add a little more water to really smooth out the coat before the next one, I simply lower the index finger and rub the polish with that finger for a few seconds. If polish is transferred from the shoe back to the cloth covering the index finger then you used it too soon.

    6) As I need more polish, I simply rub the middle finger lightly in the tin of polish again.

    7) As the cloth dries out I spray (or tap) a little water onto the cloth covering the fingers.

    This technique allows me more control over the amount of water and polish I use, as well as giving me a good feel for the smoothness of the wax.

    I normally only use neutral paste polish (over a good color cream coat) when creating a mirror shine. I used color in the picture so that the amount of polish could be seen.

    [​IMG]
     


  11. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Mine technique is a bit different. Same two finger, wrapped in cotton cloth. But I use my ring finger for drips of water. And at the end of the shine process, almost all pigments on the cotton cloth are transferred to the shoe.

    No fancy $50 water dispenser. No cotton swab polishing either (Armoury/Leather Soul uses cotton pads).

    And I only have 3 buffing brushes; one for black, one for dark brown, and one for light brown. JLP bespoke pretty much has a brush for shades of colors...
     


  12. benhour

    benhour Senior member

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    Mine is quite a lot different ! I use one finger and a cotton cloth (old t-shirt as well )! The first time I use a lot more polish than the others! I use to blow air on the wax , it helps to harden it a little faster! Use circular motions and working all the toe area at the same time! Btw I blow air on the wax on my finger before start aplaying it on the shoe to cause turpentine evaporation so it won't strip the previous layer ! After that I use a microfiber (sunglasses cloth) for the last layer ! It makes the surface a lot smoother ! At the end I do a little trick I found out to make it more refined and end up like the last pic I posted!
     


  13. benhour

    benhour Senior member

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    Btw I don't take water with the cloth I just throw it( usually i spit ) on the shoe toe !
     


  14. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    I spit shine as well when I am lazy to mix my alcohol water. Works especially well if I am drinking Scotch. lol.

    Spit shine creates the ultimate bonding experience w/ my own shoes.
     


  15. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    Evaporation plays a greater role in polishing a shoe than most people realize.

    Both the polish solvent, and the water used to press against the wax, vaporize. Not only does this remove the liquid solvent and the water from the surface, it also cools the surface of the wax slightly (like sweat evaporating off of the skin of a jogger).

    Another interesting aspect is that the solvent and the water evaporate at different rates. The solvent (if it is Naphtha or Turpentine) evaporates about ten times faster than water. Isopropyl Alcohol (rubbing alcohol) evaporates about twice as fast as water, and four times slower that turpentine.

    The faster the moisture evaporates the cooler the surface it was on becomes (it has to do with heat energy). Countering that action when polishing the shoe is the friction heat caused by the rubbing. So the less pressure rubbing required and the faster the evaporation, the easier it is to create a smooth coat of wax.

    Of course the dissolving aspect of the solvent plays a role in this process as well, partially breaking down the wax of the previous coat, and allowing the current polish to spread. The quicker the solvent evaporates in this case the better.

    As a side note: one of the reasons I use orange oil as the solvent in my polish is that it evaporates about three times faster than turpentine when exposed to air.

    When benhour blows on the polish on his applicator he is speeding up the evaporation process of the solvent before even applying it to the shoe thus minimizing the dissolving effects.

    When chogall adds alcohol (not the good scotch please), he is speeding up the evaporation of the water, and cooling the surface even more, between coats.

    So, I guess there is some science to it after all.
     


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