1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

    Messages:
    2,372
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2012

    It's hard to say for sure, but there seems to be a relatively consistent pattern there. The indentations or "divots" are in the sock liner, which is simply a thin piece of leather and foam covering the heel area of the actual leather insole. In most manufacturers of quality Goodyear-welted footwear, the heels are nailed on, either from the bottom up, or from the inside down (or both). Either way, the sock liner is there to cover up the unsightly nails and protect the heel from discomfort from them. Particularly when the nails are driven from the inside of the shoe down into the heel, the force from the machine leaves small indentations in the leather insole where each nail is. I would imagine that in shoes that are very worn (like the ones in your pictures), after the foam and leather from the sock liner gets old and compressed, you may be able to see the indentations showing through to the surface of the sock liner.

    As for the soles turning black... I wouldn't go so far as using the term "rot" in most cases. That's probably going to be extreme in most cases. It is normal for leather soles to get very dark after years of wear in areas that don't directly contact the ground on a regular basis, thus exposing fresh leather with each wear. The waist of the sole may contact surfaces infrequently (like when going down stairs, or walking over high spots like thresholds, going up or down curbs, etc.) Inevitably, they pick up dirt, they get wet when walking in the rain, etc. Since they aren't contacting abrasive surfaces regularly to expose fresh leather, they darken and take on the hardened look you see.

    If the part of the sole that always contacts the ground is very dark, then that is likely just because the previous owner walked on indoor surfaces (less abrasive) much more frequently than outdoor surfaces (highly abrasive). If you buy a pair of new shoes and wear them indoors on hard surfaces, dirty floors, linoleum, public restrooms, etc., they will get dark and gross looking. Walking outside is what wears that off.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. kloss

    kloss Senior member

    Messages:
    225
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2013
    Thanks. That was educational. I suppose that explains why the sock liner can turn black as well.
     
  3. Munky

    Munky Senior member

    Messages:
    1,600
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Location:
    Wales, UK
    'Divot' is a lovely word but is it being used correctly here? I though a divot was a sort of lump of grass - the sort that is often kicked up by golfers. I suppose these distinctions of meaning don't really matter as long as everyone knows what is being talked about.
    Yours faithfully,
    A. Pedant
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2013
  4. kentyman

    kentyman Senior member

    Messages:
    760
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2012
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    See definition #2: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/divot

    Honestly, I've only heard divot refer to the hole itself, not the thing that was removed to make the hole. Possibly an American/British English difference.
     
  5. David Copeland

    David Copeland Senior member

    Messages:
    900
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2013
    Location:
    Originally from Newport Beach - Now living in West

    San Francisco?

    Then the best shine is at "A Shine & Company", featured on local news. (They also are in New York)

    Here is their link: A Shine & Company Locations

    (They also use Saphir Products)
     
  6. Munky

    Munky Senior member

    Messages:
    1,600
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Location:
    Wales, UK
    If it's not a rude question, why do people buy beaten up old shoes on e-bay? Surely shoes wear in around a particular person's foot? Wouldn't it be better to wait until you have the money for a new pair?
     
  7. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

    Messages:
    10,701
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2009
    Location:
    Nihon

    Replace your divots is a universal golffe expression. The hole is a divot, and the piece of grass is a divot.
     
  8. basiameda

    basiameda Active Member

    Messages:
    27
    Joined:
    May 23, 2013
    Ironically, I have a question concerning a #8 Tassel Loafer I picked up from eBay. These loafers crease and fold in a similar way on both shoes but my right foot is borderline D/E and accentuates the pattern from the previous owner resulting in bowing.

    [​IMG]

    Can a cobbler do anything to fix this? If i send them in for Alden Restoration, will this fold pattern go away when the shoes are relasted?
     
  9. kwhitelaw

    kwhitelaw Senior member

    Messages:
    2,293
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    for some (myself included), it's a cheaper way to try out a particular last that may or may not work longterm. saves me money.

    in some cases, a well broken in shoe might need a resole. that might score a new buyer a much lower price, which, after the resole (and possible upper recondition) during resole replacement, could net the new buyer a decent savings over brand new retail pricing.
     
  10. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Don't bother. The last is not for you.
     
  11. kwhitelaw

    kwhitelaw Senior member

    Messages:
    2,293
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    sadly, I'd cut your losses. loafers are the hardest, imo, to get fitted off the fly. even moreso when preworn.

    I'd spend some time in a local (hopefully) to you store of a retailer that offers the manuf you are interested in. get fitted professionally, buy a pair there to support them for their help, and then you'll have a better idea of what to look for in the future..
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2013
  12. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,328
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    

    Great question. Every pair of shoes I ever bought online (wasn't many) went right back. You never know what you are going to get… how the owner took care of them and such. I have a friend who has spent a small fortune trying to find deals on ebay. Honestly, not worth my time or effort. In the end you probably spend the same amount buying duds.
     
  13. green garden

    green garden Senior member

    Messages:
    362
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    +1 same experience.
     
  14. jungleroller

    jungleroller Senior member

    Messages:
    2,280
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2013
    Location:
    Chicago
    Do any of you guys have experience with drill bit polishing systems?

    Something along these lines:

    [​IMG]
     
  15. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,328
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    Yes, I bought one out of curiosity because it was cheap. I threw it in the garbage after about 10 minutes. That is all you need to know.
     
  16. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

    Messages:
    4,254
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2013
    Location:
    Where the palm tree meets the pine
    If it seems to be the answer to life and costs only $9.99 the chances are you are being taken for ride
     
  17. jungleroller

    jungleroller Senior member

    Messages:
    2,280
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2013
    Location:
    Chicago
    That brand? That one in particular looks cheap/as seen on tv quality, but I would like to think the concept is worthwhile.
     
  18. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    There are certainly gems on eBay for shoppers armed with knowledge.

    Hand polishing is faster on finished leathers.
     
  19. joonian

    joonian Senior member

    Messages:
    407
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2007
    Location:
    London
    I have a question about removing old polish with Renomat. I just got a pair of ebayed Loake chukkas in English tan. The toes have had dark brown wax applied to them. So I did what the Renomat pictoral instructions said and brushed, applied Renomat, left for 15 minutes. At the end of 15 minutes -- no difference, literally!

    I then did another round of Renomat, with the extra step of taking a small applicator brush to the toes after the Renomat had settled in for a few minutes. The old wax seemed to spread out a little bit, but it wasn't removed.

    Do I have to get some acetone/white spirit/other alcohol for this? Shouldn't Renomat be taking care of this easily? The old wax actually doesn't look like a huge amount, it's just that it's noticeable because it's a different colour. Am I using the Renomat wrongly?

    On a sidenote, I have had very good results with Saphir's suede cleaner with multiple pairs of shoes, and I just did what the instructions said.
     
  20. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Are those shoes burnished at factory??

    If not, try Naptha or Spirit of turpentine.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by