**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Likes Received:
    1,105
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Don't think the toe will crack that fast but yes they have already cracked beyond fixing. However it could still be worn, no problem at all. That's character.
     
  2. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

    Messages:
    748
    Likes Received:
    191
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Location:
    Bend, Oregon
    

    Hard to offer advice without an image to go from (not sure what worse for wear means to you), but in general I would say give the shoes a rub down with some Lexol leather cleaner, then apply a couple of coats of colored cream polish (whatever brand you like). Brush vigorously.

    If the tassels are flaring, soak them in some Lexol leather conditioner, wrap a rubber band around each toward the end, and let dry overnight.

    The Lexol products are pretty inexpensive, and you can pick them up at most shoe repair shops in the US.
     
  3. aglose

    aglose Senior member

    Messages:
    858
    Likes Received:
    166
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    I'll snap a picture tomorrow, thanks for the advice I'll have to find some lexol around town here.
     
  4. Like a Sir

    Like a Sir Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    May 1, 2013
    Hi, I got theses Cheaney shoes. Any tips how to handle the cracks?


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. David Copeland

    David Copeland Senior member

    Messages:
    900
    Likes Received:
    48
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2013
    Location:
    Originally from Newport Beach - Now living in West
    No, you are not mistaken. Nick (with B Nelson Shoes) spoke with me on the phone several weeks ago to offer a Saphir Shoe Shine to those in NYC at a cost of $7 per pair. He also said he offers the Saphir products for sale at his store. In the conversation I mentioned another fast growing company which has opened up shoe shine stands nationwide and offers mail-in mail-back options (which is what Nordstroms offers also) - and in the conversation Nick also echoed he had many international customers who mailed in their shoes to his store. Apparently, based on his recent comments, his primary business is recrafting and not shining. If so, then it is my mistake for mentioning his store as an additional option for others to mail (or drop off) shoes for shining for routine maintenance.

    "A Shine and Company" does offer the mail-in mail-out option, and I spoke to one of the owners (Rachel Lemey) about the same time I spoke to Nick. Rachel was very encouraged to make it known they are willing and able to offer this service. Their primary business is shines, and after starting in San Francisco - the have now opened up in many other cities and airports across the country. Mike Rowe did a great news story on their techniques and products.

    And as Nick mentioned, he has had domestic staff stop by his store with many shoes to be shined and maintained - but prefers not to tie up his recrafting staff for shines. That is the difference - knowing what your primary business is. In my opinion, offering maintenance and excellent shines could very well mead to recrafting down the line. That is one reason why Nordstroms offers $2.50 shoe shines to customers who would then purchase other products and services in their store. Cross-selling can be good - but it has to be organized and well managed to avoid pollution of the company's chief aim and mission.
     
  6. Shoefish8

    Shoefish8 Member

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    I recently picked up a pair of Aldeburgh tan brogues from Oliver Sweeney (http://www.oliversweeney.com/shoes-and-boots/goodyear-welted/info/aldeburgh-tan/aldepatan.html) that I have yet to care for except for brushing/using trees. I've been trying to read up on what kind of products I should use to care for and maintain their quality in the foreseeable future but I'm having trouble sifting through the massive amount of information out there.

    If I am only looking to maintain my shoes, and wish to be weary of discolouring the shade of tan they came in (the reason I bought them), what kind of polish/créme should I get? I was going to go for a neutral tone but after doing some reading it seems as if neutral polishes were advised against.

    Can SF excuse my ignorance and help me out?
     
  7. RIDER

    RIDER Senior member

    Messages:
    1,357
    Likes Received:
    126
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    RVA - NYC
    
    More than decent, that's an easy fix and they have tons more life left in them. There is no cracking of the leather to worry about...what you see is simply the spray antiquing finish lifting off. Eliminate it with any preferred deglazer and you'll be ready to start again rebuilding a finish. As for the small tear, you can either simply pick it up and cut it off and fill the void with a little melted wax (if you really want it redone top notch take the shoes to your best local shoe repair...we distribute a product called filling wax to repair shops (numerous other companies the same) which is not available in consumer packaging - only to repairers - and they will know exactly what to do) and it will eventually fill, or you can attempt to pull it back, drop a little all-purpose cement (there are special glues, but even gorilla glue will from a home store will do) and lay it back down and cover it during your refinishing. Other than that, the shoes look to be in great shape...a little elbow grease and the right products should fix them right up.
     
  8. RIDER

    RIDER Senior member

    Messages:
    1,357
    Likes Received:
    126
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    RVA - NYC
    
    British Tan cream, Neutral wax......done. Although rarely do shoes in that color stay that way over their entire life....assuming they get worn. The elements will darken them up some no matter how hard you try.
     
  9. Shoefish8

    Shoefish8 Member

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Thanks for the help! Is British Tan cream a brand product or are you describing generic products from Britain? I tried checking what kind of leather the shoes are made of but their site claims it is "pass leather" which I can't even find a definition for on google. What is the actual disadvantage of using a neutral cream as well as neutral wax?

    By cream I assume that includes Meltonian etc, but not kiwi/saphire which I understand are wax based polishes?
     
  10. aglose

    aglose Senior member

    Messages:
    858
    Likes Received:
    166
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    Here are the pics of the loafers I was talking about earlier.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. OzzyJones

    OzzyJones Senior member

    Messages:
    3,006
    Likes Received:
    549
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2012
    Location:
    Here
    
    You really are a spectacular rocket! I'm also intrigued as to how someone who's father was in the US military writes like they learned English as an additional language around the same time they started posting on SF
     
  12. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

    Messages:
    748
    Likes Received:
    191
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Location:
    Bend, Oregon
    

    Well I will certainly defer to the guy with years of refinishing experience.

    I am surprised that you would mention gorilla glue as an option however. I normally recommend barge cement if there is a flap large enough to put a dab of glue under. I like the rubber cement characteristics of barge cement, and it seems to be a common item carried by shoe repair shops. In my experience using gorilla glue (on things other than shoes) it expands considerable in all directions as it dries to a hard state. On the gorilla glue bottle itself it states that the glue will expand 3 to 4 times. I would think this would cause a lump under the leather that was being repaired.
     
  13. GMMcL

    GMMcL Senior member

    Messages:
    4,727
    Likes Received:
    8,781
    Joined:
    May 26, 2011
    

    Noteh multi isn't working on my phone so I will just respond to this one.

    Thanks for the good news and great advice! Hugely relieved. They're exactly what I've been looking for, and they were pretty cheap, by the standards of my area (the thrift threaders avoid quoting prices, but suffice it to say these cost me less than a $20 bill). So with maybe another $10 investment plus time, I've finally got myself a really nice, antiques looking modern lasted pair of cap toe oxfords, one of the harder "staple" shoes to find!
     
  14. GentlemanJohnny

    GentlemanJohnny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2012
    Whoops...wrong thread....
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2013
  15. traverscao

    traverscao Senior member

    Messages:
    1,437
    Likes Received:
    49
    Joined:
    May 22, 2013
    Location:
    United States
    Lard plus some cedar wood oil is all what was needed. Maybe some beeswax into the mixture. Heat and stir well.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by