**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. OzzyJones

    OzzyJones Senior member

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  2. archangle13

    archangle13 Senior member

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    This is SF, dude... Come on, cut the pretense. Which SF member doesn't condition the insides of his shoes? [​IMG]
     
  3. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    For instance, what stuff is he brushing on @ 3:48? Too thick to be an ordinary dye, yet too liquid to be a wax/cream we novices use:



    Lear
     
  4. OzzyJones

    OzzyJones Senior member

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    I'm obvs still a naif. I humbly beg your pardon and shall immediately start doing this. Should make for nice soft feet too!! :D
     
  5. joiji

    joiji Senior member

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    Firstly, something about that repair job puts me off. I can't say I favor half soles at the best of times but his treatment is less than stellar.

    Lear, possibly edge kote?

    https://www.tandyleatherfactory.com.au/en-aud/search/searchresults/2225-122.aspx
     
  6. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

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    lear check into the leatherworker sites they have tons of stuff on leather burnishing and homemade devices .they seem to prefer old washer( or is it dryer?) motors .you will find that there are a variety of dressings used .i use bees wax and meletonian cream for color
     
  7. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    Agreed, which is why I simply drop them off at the RMW shop in Bond Street, London. For minor repairs (heels etc) they used to send to a cobbler near Goodge Street, who also sold RMW. Might have changed since.

    Thanks for the link, I'll investigate.

    Edit: Interesting products on this page:

    https://www.tandyleather.eu/en-gbp/...-edge-dressing-1/leather-edge-dressing-1.aspx



    Thanks englade321, I've bookmarked a few for later.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2013
  8. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    This would be perfect for the den/study, no? Now that I have a shop apron, I might as well...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I just can't decide if I should go with the bench or floor stand model. I think they run about $1500 and the stand for the floor model another $500. My cobbler has the floor version.

    http://www.pilgrimshoemachine.com/new.html
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2013
  9. EnsitMike

    EnsitMike Active Member

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    Here is a pair I just finished. The pants are actually an oxblood color, so you can imagine the shoes are equally more warm in tone.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2013
  10. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    four steps to create a patine/patina.

    decapage => stripping. using acetone, bleach, sandpaper, or anything that gets rids of dyes/color. none of the renomat weaksauce. can skip this part for raw leather.
    teinture => dyeing. the art of patina.

    cirage => polish. either cream or wax. some companies creating faux patina using cirage instead of leather dyes, thus the reason people call it 'art'. but in reality its much less an art/skill compare to shoe dyeing.
    glacage => mirror shine/spit shine/fire shine.

    the other important part of patina creation is burnishing, which is essentially wax + heat that changes/burns the wax into the leather pore. sole edges finishes this way. toe caps are sometimes 'burnished' by going through high speed polishing machines and wax polishes.
     
  11. EnsitMike

    EnsitMike Active Member

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    You, sir, rock [​IMG]

    Many thanks!
     
  12. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    Nicely stated chogall.

    While this is all very true and this likely goes without saying, I can't help but to issue a warning that performing any or all of the above steps shouldn't be conducted by an amateur on their good shoes. As ensitmike and others indicated, practice on some old shoes.
     
  13. EnsitMike

    EnsitMike Active Member

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    Good advice. I went ahead and gave it a shot tonight. Now giving cirage style patina a try, I can say dye is much easier and more effective as well. Smoother blending and more consistent coverage are the main benefits. The cirage patina was very quick though. A plus if time is an issue.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    One for den and one for study. To buff or not to buff, it's a question innit.


    Thanks Chogall. I've cut & pasted that. My search into edge finishing leads me to believe the professionals use a lump of very hard wax + heat from the spinning buffer to burnish this onto the edge. I'll leave it at that, as I don't really know what I'm talking about here. Guess DWF11 would be the man to provide accurate details.


    :nodding: Great for a first attempt. Still waiting to take the leap myself.

    Lear
     
  15. EnsitMike

    EnsitMike Active Member

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    I've looked into burnishing before. I found that wood and metal hand-irons are normally used. The trick is heat, which is done by friction with the wood, or by holding the iron over an open flame and running it across the leather. When the leather reaches a certain point, it begins to slick, and the tool begins to glide as the leather is burned or "burnished." It resembles a waxed surface but isn't always. Though, burnishing wax as well as lacquer are both used at times. You can tell by an overly waxy finish. Shoes, traditionally, are done with irons from what I've found.



    [​IMG]


    They make wood drill bits that are more consumer friendly and easy to use. I've seen long wooden pieces used, but as you can imagine it takes elbow grease to reach the burnishing threshold of heat. These usually seem to be the crafter approach.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2013

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