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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Chowkin

    Chowkin Senior member

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    Benhour, it's Japanese. Google translate doesn't do a good job translating it into English, though
     
  2. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I think you are leaving the reno on too long. It makes it very hard to produce a shine if you don't buff it out soon after application. For example spread it on one shoe, set side, spread on the other, buff the first one, then buff the second. No wait time other than what it takes to treat the other shoe.

    Also, cream polish doesn't shine nearly as much as wax polish. It is a dull glow. If you want a high shine you have to use wax.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
  3. Ulsterman

    Ulsterman Senior member

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    Thank you Sir! I'll give that a try tonight , a much faster application and removal of the Reno to start over.

    I took it from my readings at the Hangar Project website that you could use the neutral wax over a pigmented cream with good results, is that not the case? I found the neutral wax decimated any pigment added by the cream.
     
  4. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

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    I have long believed that the techniques to keep leather healthy and the ones to make it shiny are at odds .
    Flying in the face of Sf general wisdom I recently soaked a pair of vintage shells in Lexol , two heavy coats to be exact , not only are the a lot more supple they look great . It did take @ 1/2 hr per shoe of buffing tho Ill admit [​IMG]
     
  5. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    You can use a neutral wax. You're just got getting any pigment in there. No harm really. FWIW, I think pigmented look better over time. Creates a much nicer patina.
     
  6. OzzyJones

    OzzyJones Senior member

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    Balls of steel! They look great
     
  7. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Very true statement! It is a delicate balance. I'm at the point now where I don't do much to the vamp except lexol and rarely some cream polish, but I concentrate on the toe and areas that don't bend to keep shiny.

    I only use lexol on the creases on my shell not the whole thing as non-bending areas don't really any anything except a good brush and some wax now and again.

    I think too much conditioning can also be bad. Think about it, if you have a small tree branch that was freshly cut from a tree and you try to snap it it will most likely just bend because of the oils and moisture. That same branch dried out would snap no problem. HOWEVER, if you soak it too much in anything the fibers will become too soft and begin to get soggy and break apart. I wouldn't be surprised if this happens on a microscopic level in our shoes.
     
  8. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Sorry, message by mistake
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
  9. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

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    I agree in theory but I wore heavy work boots under very severe conditions for many years and I would soak them in animal fats on a regular basis . I never noticed any leather deterioration but then again they were pretty much destroyed by other causes within a couple years
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
  10. benhour

    benhour Senior member

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    i am really sorry i couldnt understand it!!! [​IMG] the translation in greek is mutch worse hahahahah
     
  11. David Copeland

    David Copeland Senior member

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    Be careful about any advice which includes using a horsehair brush where the author does not recommend experimenting with pressure. The amount of pressure can be critical to how the buffed leather will look. Too little pressure may not be enough, and too much pressure may be too much. By experiment you will learn. Another learning tool is to go to an actual professional shoe shine shop that uses either the same products - or uses products similar to what you are using.

    Be careful about any advice which points to more maintenance than what is actually prudent. Many professionals say "less is more". And that may include less brushing in one single step, where light brushing with several repeat steps may get you where you want.

    Be careful with the amount of time you allow to dry between process steps. One of the best department stores (Nordstroms) keeps their professional shine down to $2.50, and they use a combination of creams, wax, balm, and other products. But their talent lies in how much product is applied, the amount of drying time (some of their store have added fans to increase the drying), the type of cloth used to apply and used to buff, the horsehair brush, and the amount of pressure.

    The following links do provide some details before you experiment with your next process:

    Hanger Project Link

    Sid Mashburn Link

    All my best,

    David
     
  12. David Copeland

    David Copeland Senior member

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    Photo of polished bottom of leather shoes (very likely new, although many folks do shine the area nearest the heel):

    [​IMG]

    "Appears" complete sole has been maintained with polished routine, while the heel looks like regular wear.

    Imagine sitting cross-legged in a chair, or feet up on the desk - and someone can't help but notice how well the shoes are maintained. If the full sole in this photo is new (which is very likely), then for those who polish the small area of the sole near the heel will certainly be able to show a well maintained look.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
  13. Ulsterman

    Ulsterman Senior member

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    Thanks very much for the links and the advice. I am currently in the midst of my second attempt. Adjustments so far are applying the reno with a microfiber, and buffing off almost immediately. The result is infinitely better than last night, the shoes have a nice rich color and the reno buffed off with relative ease.

    Plan is to do one coat of cream polish as i normally would, applying with a dauber and buffing with a brush followed by a cloth.

    I may try the toe caps with the wax as well, but i need to do some more reading first.
     
  14. wiredrob

    wiredrob Member

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    I've discovered that my Saphir waxed and reno kept shoes get horrible white blotches on them when they get wet and then dry. Reminds me of getting a ring stain from a glass on a waxed piece of furniture.

    I've been vigorously brushing to remove. Sometimes put more Reno or saphir lotion to "smush" the wax around and start over.

    Should I just live with this and try to avoid getting shoes wet? Or am I doing something wrong in application?

    Is there a better repair strategy than brushing?

    I never had this problem when I used Kiwi. They didn't smell as good though.
     
  15. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Oops
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
  16. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    That's not a polished sole.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
  17. Gerry Nelson

    Gerry Nelson Senior member

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    Quote:That looks like a brand new sole with no wear at the heel. Where did you get that picture from?
     
  18. David Copeland

    David Copeland Senior member

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    There might be some others who wish to answer, but below is what I found:

    [​IMG]
    Saphir Hiver-Winter Salt & Snow Stain Remover - $13.00

    QUOTE:
    "This is specifically developed to eliminate white marks caused when leather comes into contact with salt, water and snow. It can be used on all leathers, including fine leather shoes.

    "Directions:

    1. With a horsehair brush, clean any dust or dirt that may have accumulated on your shoes or leather item. If necessary, use Saphir Cleaning Soap or Renomat.

    2. Shake the Hiver-Winter Bottle.

    3. Apply the product on the affected white areas using a soft cloth.

    4. Allow to dry.

    If the area is still affected, consider using Saphir Juvacuir Recolorant or Saphir Renovating Repair Cream to recolor the leather.

    If the leather is very worn, consider using Saphir Dubbin Graisse to soften the leather.
     
  19. David Copeland

    David Copeland Senior member

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    Originally from Newport Beach - Now living in West
    I now have to agree. I have revised the original text to suggest as much.

    There are tutorials showing and suggesting to polish the small unworn section of the sole near the heel, but there is mixed opinion as to who does and who does not.
     
  20. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Had the same thing happen to my RM Williams Yearling Craftsman. And only to them. Happens only when I walked many many miles and the boots are wet either from perspiration or rain, with white blotches/powders appearing around the most creased areas.

    Initially I thought its like salt crystals forming from perspiration but once toughed it feels like wax powders. I just wipe w/ moist paper towel/napkins or brush off them.

    They stopped appearing once I stop putting a high shine all over them. They started to crack after 5 years of age at stress points already despite the only thing touches that pair of shoes are renovators. Now using Lexol on them to condition and renovators to clean..

    Never had the same thing happen to any of my other shoes for some reason.

    If he didn't have the problem w/ Kiwi, then perhaps your best suggestion should be switching back to kiwi instead of using one Saphir product to fix another Saphir products problems. What's the point of using A to cure B with C side effects and then uses D to cure side effect C with another side effect which can only be cured by E? Shoe care products shouldnt be sold like prescription drugs...
     

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