**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. kwhunter

    kwhunter Senior member

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    Saphir has a Shoe Polish Creme Surfine Pommadier SAPHIR in WHITE;
    Here:
    http://www.valmour.com/catalogue/in...support=7&id=3&id_cdt=7&start=0&id_couleur=15
    You can buy it from this site, or you can order with a local distributor.
     


  2. kwhunter

    kwhunter Senior member

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    1. countless... depending on that particular shoe (see example here: http://www.styleforum.net/t/72565/r...r-sock-shoe-pant-combos/10770_30#post_6155199 post# 10781
    2. not necessarily; depends on the type of leather and factory finish; these Church's required more work than other brands, but the shine is excellent
    3. difficult to quantify... when I "feel" I should take some more; I don't actually take a dot, i tap into the tin of wax once
    4. more when starting and gradually reducing as shine develops; I don't spray or spit water, I dip my finger tip and transfer the droplet to the shoe.
    Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2013


  3. Gerry Nelson

    Gerry Nelson Senior member

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    More than you can imagine. It reinforces what I've been experiencing. I think that for the shoes I'm working on now, it's simply a matter of time - I can see the glaze developing compared to the other parts of the shoe but I was concerned that it should have been coming along more quickly. The shined part does feel significantly smoother and the cloth now glides a lot more smoothly than it did initially.

    Thank you! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2013


  4. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    I can't wait to see the response you get to these questions. There are so many skilled people in this thread, that each have their own take on this process, and what works for them.

    Here is my 2 cents worth:

    I always start with a base of a well brushed cream polish shine. This allows me to know that the shoe has received at least some conditioning from the oils in the cream polish, and that the wax in the cream polish has covered most minor imperfections in the leather that I might encounter. So, in my opinion, a good mirror shine starts with a good brush shine of cream polish.

    The number of layers depends on the slight contours of the leather I am trying to mirror shine. A broad, relatively flat, quarter brogue, cap toe is the ideal surface for a mirror shine. Getting the same level of mirror shine on the toe of a wholecut usually takes me more layers of paste. I use very thin layers of hard paste that is high in Carnauba wax (I even made my own blend specifically for this purpose). It usually takes me between 4 to 6 layers to get a mirror shine on the aforementioned cap toe. I can usually get a mirror shine on any toe in no more than 8 to 10 very thin coats. Because the number of coats vary by the toe, so does the time. I could probably put a mirror shine on a cap toe in around 10 minutes if I needed to, but I prefer to enjoy the process and do it at a leisurely pace.

    Because I use a hard paste, it goes from haze to shine in around 20 seconds of rubbing (I then rub a little more). I try to avoid heavy breathing around my shoes (it concerns my wife), so I don't breathe on the leather, I just add another coat. I find the trick is in the amount of moisture in the applicator at a given time. I start with more moisture in the applicator for the first coat, and almost no moisture for the last coat. I add moisture as needed. It should feel like you are pushing the paste, not pulling the paste.

    Pressure is a pretty important factor, and is more of an experience type of thing because it is so tactile. I would say that you start with a heavy hand and finish with a light hand. Pushing too hard can smear previous layers and impede the process. You can also oxidize the wax by using too much water, which traps the oxygen in the wax and causes hazy areas in the wax coat.
     


  5. dddrees

    dddrees Senior member

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    Thanks for the information.

    This should be a lot better than neutral, and I also noticed that they carry beige which I will need as well.

    However I'm still trying to figure out whether I should use the Saphir Renovateur Cleaner Conditioner on the white portion of the shoe. This has me a bit concerned, and I was wondering if anyone has had any experience using this on a white colored shoe?

     


  6. Gerry Nelson

    Gerry Nelson Senior member

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    Thanks, glenjay, for that very comprehensive reply. There's a lot of material about shining but these details aren't really covered. I'm looking forward to hearing what experiences others have.

    I am actually trying to polish a flat quarter-brogue cap toe so your words are encouraging.
     


  7. ddgdl

    ddgdl Well-Known Member

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    Any tips on caring for Allen Edmonds' blue leather Neumoks? It is not part of the rough collection, but the texture also does not feel particularly amenable to my ordinary routine of Reno followed by cream. Anyone have any advice?
     


  8. TheSizzle

    TheSizzle Senior member

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    Leather lotion should be appropriate for most of the cleaning/care you will perform on that shoe.
     


  9. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

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    I just wanted to say that I really enjoy your "microscopic" approach to shoe care. You have a very thorough understanding of what is happening to shoe leather that can't be seen by the naked eye.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013


  10. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

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    two questions
    1. glenjay do you simply heat the carnuba and blend it with wax polish or is it more involved than that id like to make some of my own if you would rather keep it private no prob i understand
    2. I have read in a number of posts that during recrafting the insoles cannot be replaced if this is indeed the case can anyone explain why not
     


  11. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

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    Regarding #2: You may benefit from watching some shoe making videos if this isn't understood.

    Here are some good ones:

    Allen Edmonds


    Barker


    Crockett & Jones


    Cheaney


    Edward Green


    How To Make Shoes - Gentleman's Gazette
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZzisSt-wlI

    Essentially, the insole is the foundation of the shoe from which everything else is built and attached. The insole is temporarily attached to the bottom of the last with tacks... the gemming rib (goodyear-welted shoes) or hold-fast (hand-welted shoes) is attached to the bottom of the insole (or carved from the bottom of the insole on hand-welted shoes)... the shoe upper is wrapped around the last and tacked to the gemming rib or hold-fast... the welt is stitched through the upper to the gemming rib or hold-fast... the sole is stitched to the welt. If you rip out the insole, the rest of the shoe will start to fall apart.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013


  12. Winston S.

    Winston S. Senior member

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    So during a recraft the insole is not taken apart from the welt and upper?
     


  13. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

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    No. This may be theoretically possible if carefully done with a hand-made shoe by a bespoke shoemaker. However, what that would essentially amount to is completely remaking the shoe using the same leather upper. Consider it for a second... Since the entire shoe construction process is begun with the insole, you would have to remove every component of the shoe piece by piece in order to get the insole separated.

    EDIT: I would just add that even though this is theoretically possible for a bespoke shoe maker to do, I've never heard of it being done. They would certainly charge you for a new pair of shoes since they would be essentially starting from scratch on building it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013


  14. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    Thank you very much, that means a lot to me coming from someone with your depth of knowledge.
     


  15. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

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    My knowledge of all things shoe care as they relate to this thread are quite elementary compared to yours. Shoe construction and the mechanics of it are my passion, and my knowledge starts to drop off after that.
     


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