1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    

    Let me introduce you the concept of a domestic staff. So tell me again why are people having a domestic staff or a personal valet mail their shoes for a shine?
     
  2. Beach Bum

    Beach Bum Senior member

    Messages:
    326
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2012
    
    look, for the most part high wealthy individuals are the ones if any shipping their shoes for shine. I never even thought is existed until seeing the post yesterday.

    And your ridiculous post, it's such a grey area, or hypothetical statement. So if you are sure rich and have "domestic staff" that this means you have all the so called best of class for any given service at home? Fuc& no. If you have a shoe guy in NYC and your job moves you away you don't think someone may still want to use that guy.

    Crazy talk by the uppity dude.
     
  3. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

    Messages:
    2,899
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2009
    

    This is scary.
     
  4. David Copeland

    David Copeland Senior member

    Messages:
    900
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2013
    Location:
    Originally from Newport Beach - Now living in West
    Yes, we do have some uppity wannabes, and their character is measured by how easily they get upset over someone else's choice to pay for any service rendered.

    We have many classes within the USA, not just two or three. Folks don't need to have exceptional wealth to afford domestic staff. They just need to be able to afford it. My father, before retiring as a very high US Air Force officer, made sure my mother, brother, and I were looked after while he was at war. If there was a domestic specialty that needed attending to, and the staff was not qualified to perform the needed task - then it was outsourced to a professional. This was before UPS and a global economy.

    Anyone owning dozens of high quality shoes and earning more income per hour which exceeds $3, $7, $10, or even $25, plus insured trackable carrier fees - who desires to maintain their best look - may choose to have an outside source keep their shoes in excellent condition. Those who complain about it, whine, grind their teeth, spit, sputter, and use their privilege of commentary - only reveal themselves to be of a class not worth mentorship - unless they are opting for the talk-radio character.
     
  5. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

    Messages:
    2,136
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2007
    Location:
    NBPT, MA
    I was at the Venetian in Vegas a couple of months ago and noticed that the shoe shine stands all offer a service for sneakers. What's a shoe shine stand going to do with a pair of sneakers?
     
  6. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

    Messages:
    2,033
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Location:
    Norway
    Earn money.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. benhour

    benhour Senior member

    Messages:
    644
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2012
    Location:
    Athens
    hahahaha totally agree with that!!!
     
  8. David Copeland

    David Copeland Senior member

    Messages:
    900
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2013
    Location:
    Originally from Newport Beach - Now living in West
    Canvas cleaning, restoration, and water-proofing - not to mention some have leather trims.
     
  9. Nick V.

    Nick V. Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    1,383
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    The reality is a good shop does not want to have to pay their talented employees to unpack, shine, re-pack a pair (or 10 pair) of shoes for a shine. Then add shipping time and costs. It's just not practical. These days a good craftsman is expensive. When you have several of them it adds up quickly. Good shops stay busy almost all year. Using your skilled people to do routine maintenance is a waste of time.

    A good operator would rather give tips and advice to the DIYer on regular maintenance. This way you help the customer while saving yourself time for your talented staff to work on jobs that require the best of their skills. I've had customers (butlers) come in and say “I have a lot of business for you today”. They take out 8,10,12 pair of shoes for a shine. This is not business for a busy shop. It's a waste of time and talent and sets you off schedule for others that you have obligations to. All it really is, is an accommodation to the customer.
     
  10. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

    Messages:
    4,256
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2013
    Location:
    Where the palm tree meets the pine
    Wouldnt want them low class uppity wannabes usin that there privilage of commentary
     
  11. GMMcL

    GMMcL Senior member

    Messages:
    4,724
    Joined:
    May 26, 2011
    Gents: I bought these Santonis secondhand today. They're generally in good repair except for the scuffs/gouge to the left toe. Is this repairable in a way that they will ever look decent? I have a few days left to return them, if necessary. Keep in mind, I do like my shoes to look nice, but I'm not a stickler for a high spit shine, which I realize these shoes will never fully take given that gouge. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  12. Beach Bum

    Beach Bum Senior member

    Messages:
    326
    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2012
    
    Interesting,so shoe shiners are the only employers I know where they prefer less business and less business is better. Must be nice.
     
  13. aglose

    aglose Senior member

    Messages:
    858
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    maybe this question would be better served in the quick question forum but I'll start here to get the best advice. I have a pair of Chaps(I know not SF approved) tassel loafers that today I noticed are looking slightly worse for wear. what would you recommend to fix these up? and I would prefer to have a recommendation of kiwi polish over saphir but if saphir is what they need then I guess they will get saphir.
     
  14. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

    Messages:
    4,256
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2013
    Location:
    Where the palm tree meets the pine
    
    This gentlemans company is in the business of re- crafting shoes his post is in re sponse to another forum members statement that people mailed their shoes to him to be shined . If I am mistaken I stand corrected
     
  15. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

    Messages:
    748
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Location:
    Bend, Oregon
    
    If all you are concerned with is the overall cosmetics of the shoe, and you don't need a high shine, then yes they can be made to look decent. 1) I would put a coat of leather conditioner on both shoes (you want to keep both shoes looking the same, as best you can) then shortly after applying the conditioner take a tablespoon (because it has a broader curvature than a teaspoon) and try to rub each of the scratches, scuffs, and nicks down as smooth as you can. Let the conditioner dry overnight. 2) Get a cream shoe polish a couple shades darker that the shoe color (perhaps even a dark brown), and put a couple of coats on each shoe. When brushing the shoe polish in (at the damaged areas), remember to brush the same direction you used with the spoon to press down each scratch, scuff, and nick. Brush the rest of each shoe as you typically would. The shoe cream is used to darken the color of the shoes somewhat and hide the damage. If you don't want to darken the whole shoe then only apply the darker polish to each toe. 3) Apply a few coats (as many as needed) of dark brown, or even black, paste polish to the toes; using the wax as a sort of filler in the areas of the damage. The black polish will not turn the toe black, but it will darken it even further (and add to the existing patina). Brush the shoes gently for and even glow, and they should look great. Aside from the cosmetics, the leather on the toe looks very dried out, to the point of irreparable damage. But that should not effect the look of the shoe from a casual observer. I suspect however, that in the not too distant future (six months to a year or so) the leather on the toe of the shoe will begin to crack.
     
  16. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Don't think the toe will crack that fast but yes they have already cracked beyond fixing. However it could still be worn, no problem at all. That's character.
     
  17. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

    Messages:
    748
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Location:
    Bend, Oregon
    

    Hard to offer advice without an image to go from (not sure what worse for wear means to you), but in general I would say give the shoes a rub down with some Lexol leather cleaner, then apply a couple of coats of colored cream polish (whatever brand you like). Brush vigorously.

    If the tassels are flaring, soak them in some Lexol leather conditioner, wrap a rubber band around each toward the end, and let dry overnight.

    The Lexol products are pretty inexpensive, and you can pick them up at most shoe repair shops in the US.
     
  18. aglose

    aglose Senior member

    Messages:
    858
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    I'll snap a picture tomorrow, thanks for the advice I'll have to find some lexol around town here.
     
  19. Like a Sir

    Like a Sir Member

    Messages:
    5
    Joined:
    May 1, 2013
    Hi, I got theses Cheaney shoes. Any tips how to handle the cracks?


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  20. David Copeland

    David Copeland Senior member

    Messages:
    900
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2013
    Location:
    Originally from Newport Beach - Now living in West
    No, you are not mistaken. Nick (with B Nelson Shoes) spoke with me on the phone several weeks ago to offer a Saphir Shoe Shine to those in NYC at a cost of $7 per pair. He also said he offers the Saphir products for sale at his store. In the conversation I mentioned another fast growing company which has opened up shoe shine stands nationwide and offers mail-in mail-back options (which is what Nordstroms offers also) - and in the conversation Nick also echoed he had many international customers who mailed in their shoes to his store. Apparently, based on his recent comments, his primary business is recrafting and not shining. If so, then it is my mistake for mentioning his store as an additional option for others to mail (or drop off) shoes for shining for routine maintenance.

    "A Shine and Company" does offer the mail-in mail-out option, and I spoke to one of the owners (Rachel Lemey) about the same time I spoke to Nick. Rachel was very encouraged to make it known they are willing and able to offer this service. Their primary business is shines, and after starting in San Francisco - the have now opened up in many other cities and airports across the country. Mike Rowe did a great news story on their techniques and products.

    And as Nick mentioned, he has had domestic staff stop by his store with many shoes to be shined and maintained - but prefers not to tie up his recrafting staff for shines. That is the difference - knowing what your primary business is. In my opinion, offering maintenance and excellent shines could very well mead to recrafting down the line. That is one reason why Nordstroms offers $2.50 shoe shines to customers who would then purchase other products and services in their store. Cross-selling can be good - but it has to be organized and well managed to avoid pollution of the company's chief aim and mission.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by