**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Crat

    Crat Senior member

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    Do you prefer Obenauf's oil to LP?
     


  2. grendel

    grendel Senior member

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    I use both, but he might be having problems with too much wax already, so I suggested the oil.
     


  3. Chase H

    Chase H Senior member

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    Venetian shoe cream: can it be used like reno for calfskin shoes as well?
     


  4. SoGent

    SoGent Senior member

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    what's good for water spots on shell ?
     


  5. Xancatrius

    Xancatrius Senior member

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    Hi guys, just a 17 year old kiddo who would like to form an appreciation for the finer things in life, shoe shining and polishing included.

    2 very honest questions, I hope you guys would be kind enough to oblige me on this.

    1 : For a complete average joe with no knowledge of shoe shining whatsoever, could anybody provide the steps as to shining of shoes? I've read about 20 pages of this thread and heard terms like buff polish and wax being thrown about but I have no idea what they are. I'm not looking to antique or mirror polish my shoes, just would like to know how to polish my shoes such that the creasing is minimized, the leather maintains healthy and there is just a nice shine to it.

    2. I just recently purchased a pair of dark brown Bottega loafers. Luck had it that I would be caught in a torrential downpour. The shoes seemed fine at first but recently I have noticed stressing on certain parts of the loafer, "wrinkles" would be the word that comes to mind. Any idea how to restore the leather? Also, due to the loafers having no actual sole attached to the upper, just rubber sticking out at the bottom, the rest being leather, the bottom front part actually got discolored and slightly scratched due to friction I think. Based on my very shallow understanding, would wax polish be able to cover it up? And also, is there a different way as to polish such loafers as opposed to normal dress shoes?

    Any input would be greatly appreciated. Much thanks in advance.
     


  6. SuitedDx

    SuitedDx Senior member

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    Do you mean the small welts? Immediately after I brushed and used Reno just to smoothen it out. They eventually go away (at least to the point I do not notice them).
     


  7. Winston S.

    Winston S. Senior member

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    If you are referring to the welts as mentioned previously, people have used the back of a spoon or a deer bone to smooth those out too.
     


  8. grendel

    grendel Senior member

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    And lots of brushing... lots of brushing is usually the answer for shell
     


  9. Winston S.

    Winston S. Senior member

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    I feel like 95% of the time brushing is the answer for shell.
     


  10. SoGent

    SoGent Senior member

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    thanks to Dr, Winston & grendel . . . . going to try boning RenoV & a touch of cordovan creme then copious brushing i guess
    after searching & getting an idea of why the welts appear the bone appears to be the best choice
     


  11. 454Casull

    454Casull Senior member

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    What is the consensus on an economical conditioner that does not darken leather whatsoever? I'm not sure I want to jump the gun on Renovateur at ~$20 a jar.

    Is Bick 4 as good as everyone else claims it is?
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2013


  12. jvc44

    jvc44 Senior member

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    Meltonian leather balm works well
     


  13. SuitedDx

    SuitedDx Senior member

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    I used to use this when it was a cream color. I recently saw that they are now white so they must have changed their formula. It was a good cream but Saphir is definitely noticeably much better. I also use AE's cleaner/conditioner for my foul-weather leather shoes.
     


  14. BootSpell

    BootSpell Senior member

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    I used to think this but finally bought some Saphir Reno. Yes, it's expensive but it is a very good product. The thing is, you really use only a very little and I'm surprised at how long the first jar I bought is lasting. It's not like you're going through a jar every month or two, at least forme, anyhow.
     


  15. Gdot

    Gdot Senior member

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    Welcome young one.

    Your best simple bet is Meltonian cream polish in a shade to match your shoes (or just slightly lighter).

    From your description of the sole it sounds like you bought 'driving shoes' these are not going to be terribly durable, they are not designed for heavy wear.

    As for the wrinkles - they happen - shoe trees, kept in the shoe at all times that you are not wearing them will minimize them.
     


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