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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Ndure

    Ndure Senior member

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    Where can I get boot black products?
     


  2. TDP

    TDP Senior member

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    Dear all,
    I apologise if this topic has been covered, but how would you recommend I condition an ostrich wallet? The canonical thing to do would be renovateur, then neutral leather food of some kind, I imagine—anything else? Thank you in advance :)!
     


  3. Louis XIV

    Louis XIV Senior member

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    How do you guys care for your gym/running/sports shoes?
    I have two pairs that started to smell from sweat.
    I wrapped them into a plastic bag and put them into the freezer for a day to kill everything that was living in the fabric but it didn't help much.
    Do you use certain sprays to eliminate the organisms in the shoes?
    I don't want to put them into the washer because it will ruin the insole and attacke the glue that attaches the outersole.
     


  4. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    I'm all for people discovering their own 'method'. However, some rules cannot be broken.

    The Golden Rule

    When applying conditioner or soft/hard wax: DO NOT apply your initial dab of product to a joining seam. Nor should you apply right next to the seam and head straight to it with a fully charged cloth/finger. I know it's so bloody obvious, but in your enthusiasm to show care easily forgotten. Instead, press that dab onto a wide expanse of leather. Now massage in circles. Continue outwards, but still NOT touching the seams. When the product looks depleted, and you think you'll need more, push the last tad out to those seams. Dried seam gunk is ugly, and difficult to remove without spoiling the finish. So easily prevented.

    I mentioned this further back, but it's always worth repeating. It applies to everyone and every shoe, no matter what end finish you desire.

    Edit: When I say 'push the last tad out to those seams', I really mean wipe the depleted cloth into the seam. A seam in this instance being anywhere one piece of leather overlaps another.You'll think there ain't enough product on the cloth to be useful, but there always is. I've tried every other way. You might think it better to over apply on the seam and simply wipe the excess out of the joint... problem solved. Never seems to work like this though, unless using a sharp edge like a fingernail to scratch out the excess, thereby buggering up the finish again.

    I'm beginning to feel a little embarrassed at the attention to detail here. But I remember reading how one US shoe shine operation gathers for a couple of hours at the end of each week, just to discuss how they can improve on the shine :)

    Lear
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2012


  5. ezlau

    ezlau Senior member

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    I just avoid going to the gym = no sweat in my running shoes :embar:
     


  6. GentlemanJohnny

    GentlemanJohnny Well-Known Member

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    I found some bags filled with cedar shavings at a store nearby and I use those. They absorb moisture and impart a distinct cedar smell to cover up whatever lingering foot/sweat odor remains. They're cheap and you can find them online if you can't find it near you. I think one of the affiliate sites, Cedarville, sells them. They work just like shoe trees except they don't do anything with regard to shape. But they're more portable and since they're just athletic shoes I think they're more appropriate. Plus you can toss them in your gym bag along with your sweaty clothes and they'll help them dry as well as cover up the smell of sweat. Before I started using these cedar bags I used dryer sheets. They're cheap, smell like fresh laundry, they're disposable, and you can stuff a couple in your moist shoes or in your gym bag and they do the same thing. They absorb moisture and smell nice. Both have worked for me.

    Hope that helps

    ~Johnny
     


  7. Karembeu

    Karembeu Active Member

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    Gents,

    Thank you for the replies regarding proper shoe care. I was just wondering what process you guys take for caring for shoes immediately after they're worn? Do you just use a horsehair brush to brush them?

    Is any care taken for the soles? Such as simple wiping with conditioner or something? I put my shoes back in the dust bags but have a feeling I should wipe it down beforehand.

    Thanks in advance!
     


  8. ezlau

    ezlau Senior member

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    Personally, I just let them air out to dry for about 1-2 hours, and then tree them without brushing them. I don't put them back into the bags because I wear my shoes more than once per week. Every weekend I brush them and at least wipe them with a damp cloth, and polish them if deemed necessary.

    I never condition the sole, although some people might tell you otherwise. e.g: the video on Crockett & Jones' website about shoecare said to put Saphir Reno on the soles.
     


  9. brad-t

    brad-t Bae Blade

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    Crossing the divide a bit here, haha ...

    I'm a total shoe care noob – but I have a pair of shoes I wear very often and I recently got caught in a very bad blizzard with them. They took some pretty bad salt and water damage. I removed the salt, and put them near my heater to dry ... which I now know you are absolutely not supposed to do.

    Anyway, I noticed some weird spots develop where the leather is "raised up" like it's been embossed from the other side. Is there anything that can be done about this? Or should I learn to live with it?

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2013


  10. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    I would suggest putting shoe trees in shoes as soon after you take them off as possible. The point of a wooden shoe tree is to absorb the moisture from the shoe while the shoe has a solid form to dry against.
     


  11. bik2101

    bik2101 Senior member

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    i ahve a problem where my shoe trees seem to be too small (in terms of their thickness, i guess) so there is not really much support to keep the vamp tight (?) not sure if i'm describing properly, but if anyone understands what i mean, is there anything i can do to remedy this issue?
     


  12. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    Bigger, wider shoe tree?
     


  13. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    That is quite unfortunate.

    Here is what I would suggest doing (and I wouldn't do this to a healthy pair of shoes). Buy a bottle of Lexol leather conditioner, and a bottle of Lexol leather cleaner, most shoe repair places will carry both. Clean the shoes with the leather cleaner again to remove any additional salts. After the shoes have dried (at room temperature), coat the shoes thoroughly with the leather conditioner and let sit over night. Put another liberal coat of conditioner on the shoes again the next day and let sit over night. The idea is to saturate the cellular structure of the leather with oils. Clogging the cellular structure of leather with too much oil is not a good thing, be we are talking about already damaged leather here. After the shoes have dried take a slightly damp very warm cloth and rub the shoes down thoroughly to flush some of the oils back out. Next, brush the shoes thoroughly and then let them sit for another day. Lastly, rub in a coat of Saphir Renovateur (it contains oils, cleaners and wax) on your shoes then polish as you normally would.

    Others on this forum may have a better solution.
     


  14. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    ^ Excellent advice IMO.
     


  15. brad-t

    brad-t Bae Blade

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    Thanks very much. If nobody else says anything soon, I'll give it a shot.

    Is there a place online that ships to Canada where I could buy all of these items?
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2013


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