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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    Here's a pair of medallion toe shoes with a decent shine (not quite mirror). Doesn't look odd to me.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2011


  2. atila

    atila Senior member

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    When caring for my calfskin shoes, I plan to put conditioner/cleaner first, and then have the choice between either shoe polish or shoe cream. They seem to have a similar effect, so is there any reason why I should choose one over the other? I am assuming polish will give the shoe a higher shine but otherwise I'm not really sure what the difference is or which is better/preferred.

    Any insight would be helpful.
     


  3. NAMOR

    NAMOR Senior member

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    From what I understand, shoe cream is just a leather conditioner in a specific color, usually the color of your shoe. I just use a leather conditioner and then polish. If cordovan, use paste wax. I actually purchased some black shoe cream from Brooks Brothers and have only used it a few times. A few possible uses: black shoe cream on a black calfskin shoes instead of leather conditioner; use it to darker a pair of lighter shoes.
     


  4. NAMOR

    NAMOR Senior member

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    i tried spit-shining a pair of C&J Clevelands and failed. i rubber the shoes in long horizantal swipes when I should have done it concentric circles. also used saphir high-gloss.

    this dude makes it look so easy:

    suede care:
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2011


  5. calogero

    calogero Well-Known Member

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    Here's a difficult one! How should I treat/care for these shoes?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    As you can see, the central 'petals' appear to be patent leather while the borders of each are a cloth-, even suede-like material.

    I'm told that if I apply a conditioner, it will mat the clothy borders; however, if I don't treat them, they're likely to crack more easily.

    What to do? :puzzled:
     


  6. bapelolol

    bapelolol Senior member

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    Best way/product to remove old polish without damaging the leather?
     


  7. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    While that video shows a great result, I can't imagine shining shoes with a suit on...esp with a white shirt!
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2011


  8. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    What about the suede spray he sprays with a suit on? He must get some on his pants.
     


  9. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    More multitasking during Friday's conference call:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    These are chestnut RMW Craftsman in yearling, about 2.5 yrs old. After a quick brushing to remove dust (not worn much over the summer), I applied 3 thin coats of brown Kiwi wax polish.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2011


  10. NAMOR

    NAMOR Senior member

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    lookin' good pb. You did this while on a call? How long was the call? :p I think i will try the kiwi polish instead of the Saphir. Did you use a rag to apply the coats? I ask because I have seen cotton balls used.
     


  11. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    I use a cut/ripped up old cotton undershirt. I get a dozen or so strips out of each tee. The call was about an hour long :) (more below).



    I got to thinking about Gdot's comment and wondered if there may be something I'm doing differently than the tutorials I see online. The RMW boots took 2-3 coats of wax.

    When I originally started polishing my shoes, I would simply apply a coat of wax until it hazed up and let it dry for a few minutes before brushing and buffing with a clean, dry cloth. The difference today is that I continue rubbing in the polish for several minutes before brushing. The polishing cloth will dry up and the toe starts to develop a shine before brushing & buffing.

    To start, I apply a drop or two of water onto a clean section of cloth (strip of old cotton undershirt), dip the damp section of polishing cloth into the tin of kiwi wax then apply the polish to the shoe in small circles. I continue to apply the small circles with the same section of cloth for several (5+) minutes without adding more wax. By the 3-4 minute mark, the cloth is no longer damp and there's very little wax polish left on the cloth. Again, the leather starts to develop a dull shine.

    I'll then take a clean section of cloth and start the process again (before brushing), i.e., dampen with a drop or two of water and apply a second coat of wax and continue polishing in small circles until there's virtually no moisture or wax left on the cloth. Note, I still have not brushed or buffed yet. I probably get 3 coats after 15-20 minutes (before touching a brush to the shoe). At that point, I let the polish dry for a minute or two (if necessary), then brush with horsehair brush and buff & polish with the microfiber cloth. Depending on how it looks at that point, I may start applying more layers or leave it as is.

    I found this youtube video referring to "bulling" a shoe which is pretty close to what I'm doing.



     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2011


  12. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    A lot of you people really need to read the fucking thread before posting questions.
     


  13. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    Just noticed these black marks on my shoes. Is it possible too large shoe trees caused them? If not, what did? They're on both shoes.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     


  14. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I'm not really sure what I am looking at here, but whatever it is it is probably not caused by shoe trees.
     


  15. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    Patrick_b

    Those RM's look great. Looks like a very high quality batch of yearling on those. Many don't like them highly polished. On heavy duty models I agree, but on trimmer models (screwed sole especially) I like a bit of sparkle.

    Your post has me thinking about another pair :embar:

    Lear
     


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