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William Kazak

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I had a pair of Rancourt boat shoes and yes I found them pretty unsupportive and uncomfortable, not to mention abhorrent to the eye. I also avoided wearing them, until I gave them away to my dad. I imagine he is now in the process of finding someone else to give them to.
I always used to have the leather Sperry boat shoe. About six years ago I realized how I did not like them anymore because of the very flat and un-cushioned bottoms. Besides, without a boat and living south of Chicago, they were un-stylish. That is when I went for the Sperry CVO style. I was done with Converse All Stars for the same reason.
 

Fenners81

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I always used to have the leather Sperry boat shoe. About six years ago I realized how I did not like them anymore because of the very flat and un-cushioned bottoms. Besides, without a boat and living south of Chicago, they were un-stylish. That is when I went for the Sperry CVO style. I was done with Converse All Stars for the same reason.
I totally agree, although I feel like this is not the correct thread for this discussion! 😊
 

Egdon Heath

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I totally agree, although I feel like this is not the correct thread for this discussion! 😊
It will do
About six years ago I realized when I went for the Sperry CVO style. I was done with Converse All Stars for the same reason,[flat insole].
In 2015 Converse introduced the Chuck Taylor II which provided a removable, cushioned insert, dubbed Lunarlon. A couple of years ago Converse scrapped the Chuck II in favor of their latest, the Chuck 70 which has a thicker sole and an even more cushioned insole. I swear by them. Except I probably shouldn't swear here on the forum. Gosh dang then, they're really swell
 

Bayou Tiger

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What are preferences on sole edge maintenance? I wear a couple of dress shoes, but mostly Crockett & Jones boots and casual derbies and oxfords. I have been using teinture franchise, which helps maintain the dark brown color. For black sole edges I use a sharpie.

However, I am concerned over the long haul with nourishing and maintaining the sole edge leather? Is this an issue? Paul Brunngard has a sole edge iron that seems intriguing to combine with a cream polish application.
 

florent

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What are preferences on sole edge maintenance? I wear a couple of dress shoes, but mostly Crockett & Jones boots and casual derbies and oxfords. I have been using teinture franchise, which helps maintain the dark brown color. For black sole edges I use a sharpie.

However, I am concerned over the long haul with nourishing and maintaining the sole edge leather? Is this an issue? Paul Brunngard has a sole edge iron that seems intriguing to combine with a cream polish application.
No need to condition the edges but you can get a nicer finish by applying cream. The wooden edge iron is a traditional tool that is usually used on the wet bare leather to compress the fibers before finishing with wax, I see that Paul Brunngard use it after the cream, maybe worth a try.
 

GuyLab

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Hello, I honestly don't know how to deal with water marks, I thought conditioning would attenuate them but they come out even more
IMG_20240505_193505.jpg
 

TimothyF

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Looking for help and input from anyone who has waxed suede themselves or has knowledge of the procedure

Use case is on an old pair of house slippers/moccasins that has seen better days and is quite dirty/dusty. So turning the suede into waxed flesh is for protection and extending longevity, not looks

My plan is to wash the shoes (completely in water, gentle soap, rinse, dry). Then stuff the leather full of some kind of oil or wax. The question is what product? and how?

Given these are kickaround shoes, I don't need some fancy Saphir product. As long as the end result protects the leather (and acts as a barrier to future dirt, grime, spills), I would like to achieve the twin goals of low cost, and simplicity of application, if possible. Low cost is self-evident; simplicity means if it's something soft that I can just rub in with my hands, I would prefer it to hard wax that I'd have to heat gun and brush on

Any thoughts? Thanks in advance
 

Mercurio

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Looking for help and input from anyone who has waxed suede themselves or has knowledge of the procedure

Use case is on an old pair of house slippers/moccasins that has seen better days and is quite dirty/dusty. So turning the suede into waxed flesh is for protection and extending longevity, not looks

My plan is to wash the shoes (completely in water, gentle soap, rinse, dry). Then stuff the leather full of some kind of oil or wax. The question is what product? and how?

Given these are kickaround shoes, I don't need some fancy Saphir product. As long as the end result protects the leather (and acts as a barrier to future dirt, grime, spills), I would like to achieve the twin goals of low cost, and simplicity of application, if possible. Low cost is self-evident; simplicity means if it's something soft that I can just rub in with my hands, I would prefer it to hard wax that I'd have to heat gun and brush on

Any thoughts? Thanks in advance
Maybe the following post can help:
 

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