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JFWR

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Acetone removes glue from skin. I'd assume that it'd do the same to leather, but I second the idea of applying it to a swatch of leather and see what happens.

Or why not try goo gone or other Cleaners that specifically are used on car and couch leather to remove stains from glue and oil and such?

Yeah, forget acetone: get something people use for their couches or car seats.
 

Frozenhaze

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Thanks @unprocessed
Yeah. Just for curiosity, I will try dropping some superglue on a not too much visible part of an old shoe and applying acetone. My question is if I should apply the acetone only over the glue or on a larger area. Any idea?
Acetone will do the trick when applied sparingly. Just be careful not to mess with it too much and accidentally remove the color. Apply only there where the glue is.

https://www.loctiteproducts.com/en/know-how/fix-stuff/how-to-remove-glue-from-leather-the-secret-revealed.html
 

Boggis

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Looking to gauge some opinions on the use of shoe trees on wet shoes. Typically if my shoes have gotten wet in the rain, I will leave them for a day or so without the shoe tree, to allow them to dry out. If they get really wet, I'll stuff them with dry newspaper for a few hours to draw out the bulk of the moisture. My rationale is that we draw the moisture from the shoe by allowing it to evaporate, stuffing a wooden shoe tree to fill the entire volume of the shoe surely impedes the evaporation (even if the wood is permeable).

Further, conservation of mass tells me that even if the shoe tree wood absorbs the moisture, over time it would reach "saturation" and given it spends more time inside the shoe than out of it, it wouldn't have enough opportunity to evaporate this stored moisture.

However I've been reading Handmade Shoe for Men by Vass, and he recommends putting the shoe tree in immediately, even if the shoe is wet. Any thoughts on this?
 

Goofy

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Looking to gauge some opinions on the use of shoe trees on wet shoes. Typically if my shoes have gotten wet in the rain, I will leave them for a day or so without the shoe tree, to allow them to dry out. If they get really wet, I'll stuff them with dry newspaper for a few hours to draw out the bulk of the moisture. My rationale is that we draw the moisture from the shoe by allowing it to evaporate, stuffing a wooden shoe tree to fill the entire volume of the shoe surely impedes the evaporation (even if the wood is permeable).

Further, conservation of mass tells me that even if the shoe tree wood absorbs the moisture, over time it would reach "saturation" and given it spends more time inside the shoe than out of it, it wouldn't have enough opportunity to evaporate this stored moisture.

However I've been reading Handmade Shoe for Men by Vass, and he recommends putting the shoe tree in immediately, even if the shoe is wet. Any thoughts on this?
Wicking up moisture and oders is one of the main functions of wooden shoe trees. Evaporation shouldn’t be an issue provided the room they’re being stored in is sufficiently ventilated and the climate isn’t to humid or damp.

Also keep in mind that soaked leather runs the risk of shirking and warping. Shoe trees will prevent this from happening.
 
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Boggis

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Also keep in mind that soaked leather runs the risk of shirking and warping. Shoe trees will prevent this from happening.
Think this is the strongest argument for putting the shoe trees in straight away alright.
I'm not entirely convinced on the drying out aspect, i.e. if the shoe tree absorbs the moisture... where does that moisture go? The wood can only absorb a finite amount of moisture.
I think on the balance of considerations I might revert to Vass' advice and start putting them in straight away.
 

Goofy

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Think this is the strongest argument for putting the shoe trees in straight away alright.
I'm not entirely convinced on the drying out aspect, i.e. if the shoe tree absorbs the moisture... where does that moisture go? The wood can only absorb a finite amount of moisture.
I think on the balance of considerations I might revert to Vass' advice and start putting them in straight away.
It evaporates. The point is to get the moisture out of the shoe and into the tree asap. The method you described using newspapers does the same thing, but unnecessary. Just ensure the shoes are placed in a well ventilated area.
 

dulynoted92

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Who has experience with Tarrago shoe creams? I bought several jars the other day in various colors after seeing them at a cobbler shop and doing a quick search on them. Spanish brand, water based, all natural waxes no petroleum ,owned by the same company as Saphir. I got some red and a purplish toned color they call Bordeaux. Used the red all over my oxblood daltons then using the Bordeaux to burnish the toe as it's a darker tone.

I noticed that with any application of water the dyes just come right back off the shoe. Like it doesn't hold up at all, but then again...it's a water based cream so it makes sense everything in it is water soluble. So.....how are water based creams useful at all if everything in them can be washed off of or out of leather with just water ? Am I applying it wrong ? Out it on, letting it dry for 5 to 10 minutes, then brushing off. It feels weird that the pigment would lift off with water so easily...
 

Mercurio

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Who has experience with Tarrago shoe creams? I bought several jars the other day in various colors after seeing them at a cobbler shop and doing a quick search on them. Spanish brand, water based, all natural waxes no petroleum ,owned by the same company as Saphir. I got some red and a purplish toned color they call Bordeaux. Used the red all over my oxblood daltons then using the Bordeaux to burnish the toe as it's a darker tone.

I noticed that with any application of water the dyes just come right back off the shoe. Like it doesn't hold up at all, but then again...it's a water based cream so it makes sense everything in it is water soluble. So.....how are water based creams useful at all if everything in them can be washed off of or out of leather with just water ? Am I applying it wrong ? Out it on, letting it dry for 5 to 10 minutes, then brushing off. It feels weird that the pigment would lift off with water so easily...
Without being an expert, I assume that it contains waxes diluted in a water-soluble formula, that needs to evaporate to allow the other blend components to act, before any brushing can be done: they actually ask for a 15 minutes allowance in the "how to use it" guide in their webpage.
  1. Brush to remove the dust.
  2. With a clean cloth, apply evenly a little quantity of product.
  3. Let it dry 15 minutes.
  4. Buff with a dry cloth or a polish brush to get the desire shine

They have another line of shoe polish, not the "Premium", that "is a pigmented wax-based polish". This one needs 10 minutes for drying.

 

Shawnc

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Tried something different with my 10-eyes Viberg's today. I've been wearing them pretty hard this year as I really want to put some miles and wear on them. Last wear they got caught in the rain. Nothing major and was fine living with it but today decided to clean them up a bit. I like Pure Polish but it's not my go-to but today I decided to go with it. Additionally, I did something that I've thought about (primarily because I'm lazy) but never did due to concerns of uneven color. I only applied product to the cap and vamp of the boot. Nothing to the sides. I figured what the heck since a big part of the allure of these is the uneven panels. This couldn't make things any worse. I like the results.......

202201008_10Eyes5.jpg
202201008_10Eyes4.jpg
202201008_10Eyes3.jpg
202201008_10Eyes1.jpg


Just curious, anyone else apply product only to a part of the boot?
 

Goofy

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Tried something different with my 10-eyes Viberg's today. I've been wearing them pretty hard this year as I really want to put some miles and wear on them. Last wear they got caught in the rain. Nothing major and was fine living with it but today decided to clean them up a bit. I like Pure Polish but it's not my go-to but today I decided to go with it. Additionally, I did something that I've thought about (primarily because I'm lazy) but never did due to concerns of uneven color. I only applied product to the cap and vamp of the boot. Nothing to the sides. I figured what the heck since a big part of the allure of these is the uneven panels. This couldn't make things any worse. I like the results.......

View attachment 1733882 View attachment 1733883 View attachment 1733884 View attachment 1733886

Just curious, anyone else apply product only to a part of the boot?
A Nice result, but I hope you at least conditioned the rest of the leather to prevent it from drying out.
 

dulynoted92

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Without being an expert, I assume that it contains waxes diluted in a water-soluble formula, that needs to evaporate to allow the other blend components to act, before any brushing can be done: they actually ask for a 15 minutes allowance in the "how to use it" guide in their webpage.
  1. Brush to remove the dust.
  2. With a clean cloth, apply evenly a little quantity of product.
  3. Let it dry 15 minutes.
  4. Buff with a dry cloth or a polish brush to get the desire shine

They have another line of shoe polish, not the "Premium", that "is a pigmented wax-based polish". This one needs 10 minutes for drying.

Ah, alright, maybe I'm not letting it dry long enough then. I'll redo that. The pigments and color options are really good and I bought 5 jars of different colors for my various shoes so I would be a bit bummed out if it was the products fault. Good to know it's user error. Cheap stuff tho at 4 dollars a jar.
 

dulynoted92

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Without being an expert, I assume that it contains waxes diluted in a water-soluble formula, that needs to evaporate to allow the other blend components to act, before any brushing can be done: they actually ask for a 15 minutes allowance in the "how to use it" guide in their webpage.
  1. Brush to remove the dust.
  2. With a clean cloth, apply evenly a little quantity of product.
  3. Let it dry 15 minutes.
  4. Buff with a dry cloth or a polish brush to get the desire shine

They have another line of shoe polish, not the "Premium", that "is a pigmented wax-based polish". This one needs 10 minutes for drying.

Ok after checking their website I found their shoe creams not the polish. The cream, what I have, asks for a 5 minute drying time and the website says that the color will rub off if the shoes get wet or damp. Now I'm wondering if saphir creams do the same.
 

JFWR

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Ok after checking their website I found their shoe creams not the polish. The cream, what I have, asks for a 5 minute drying time and the website says that the color will rub off if the shoes get wet or damp. Now I'm wondering if saphir creams do the same.
No. Saphir is oil based: almond or Shea butter based.

It won't completely wash off. Tarrago's cream is garbage if it will run in water.
 

dulynoted92

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No. Saphir is oil based: almond or Shea butter based.

It won't completely wash off. Tarrago's cream is garbage if it will run in water.
Not sure, it's 18% carnuba and beeswax or so it says. It's made by the same company as saphir so I assumed their formulation would be similar.

I'm also not sure whether or not saphirs cremes will react with water. Almond oil is one of their listed ingredients but there is no evidence that it is the base ingredient, at least their site doesn't say so. I can find customer reviews saying the saphir cremes do rub off as well, but I can't find much specifically about what happens when the dried and buffed leather is exposed to moisture.
 
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