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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. kwhunter

    kwhunter Senior member

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    There are many ways: either use a brush and a solvent (e.g.turpentine), or a brush and leather soap.
    Brush well, dry well with cloth, let dry completely, condition and polish.
     
  2. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member

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    Dec 6, 2010
    Location:
    Arizona
    Greetings,
    I bought the Alden Indy Tobacco Chamois boot from The Shoe Mart. Please I need to know what oil, cream, wax, etc. should be used on the chamois. I did some research and it appears that Allen Edmonds used to make a chamois oil product specifically for chamois boots and shoes. I found that the chamois oil should be applied with a horse hair brush. However, Allen Edmonds stopped producing the chamois oil product. I found through my research that Russell's Moccassins sells a bottle of chamois oil for boots. My questions is and I really appreciate the help - is this chamois oil ok for the Alden Indy Tobacco Chamois boot? Does anyone owns an Alden Tobacco Chamois boot and how you care for it?

    Any help will be greatly appreciated!

    George
     
  3. grendel

    grendel Senior member

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    Did you try just brushing them?
     
  4. grendel

    grendel Senior member

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    The chamois is an oil stuffed leather, I think? I'd say just brush them. If they start to look dry you could use Lexol, Obenauf's Leather Oil, etc.
     
  5. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member

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    Arizona
    Grendel,
    Thank you for the information. I do believe that chamois is an oil stuffed leather. Interestingly, I have just been brushing the boots and that has been working great, so thank you for the confirmation on the brushing. I will get some Obenauf's Leather Oil and try it once the boots get dry (if they get dry at all!).

    I really appreciate your help and guidance!

    George
     
  6. syp is300

    syp is300 Member

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    Great thread. This is going to be very useful as I just started recently learning about shoe care.
     
  7. shoeguide

    shoeguide Active Member

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  8. shoeguide

    shoeguide Active Member

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  9. alco

    alco Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,

    Not sure if this is the correct place to post this. Toes seem pretty dry and cracked, any hope? :confused: Shoes are C&J Audley's.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2012
  10. Gdot

    Gdot Senior member

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    They'll be fine.

    I would think the best thing to do is to remove most/all of the existing wax. Condition thoroughly. And start the polish/wax from scratch.

    Use Saphir Renovateur or Lexol to remove the existing wax. Saphir Renovateur or Leather Lotion to condition (I'd do two or three applications with 24 hours in between.)
     
  11. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    IMO Saphir Renovateur or Lexol cleaner is not very effective against wax, Saphir Renomat is in it's own league! I would remove all the wax with Renomat and conditioned them liberally twice with Lexol conditioner with regards to what G-man over here said, and then use one coat of Saphir Reno, one coat of Saphir dark brown cream and then applied some dark brown wax on the toes and heels.
     
  12. grendel

    grendel Senior member

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    What he said
     
  13. razl

    razl Senior member

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    Ditto. That's concise, pro advice, there.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2012
  14. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    Even though I'm studying for my MoS in Business I think I've spent singificantly more time reading and caring about shoes. :embar:
     
  15. kwhunter

    kwhunter Senior member

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    The most effective solvent for wax is Turpentine, which an ingredient in quality shoe care products like Saphir.
    Moist a cotton rag and gently rub the area you want to clean, all old and dried wax will be removed.
     
  16. kwhunter

    kwhunter Senior member

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    You can go for a PhD in shoecare after you get your MBA... [​IMG]
     
  17. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    This is true, but after my own experience the turpentine often leaves the leather quite dried out. The renomat is not as bad with regards to the leather drying out, but are as good as turpentine when removing old wax.
     
  18. kwhunter

    kwhunter Senior member

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    Never tried Renomat a I've read mixed reviews on its efficiency in removing old wax; whereas, the turpentine is proven and at least for me it is more accesible and cheaper than Renomat.
    You can hidrate the leather with Renovateur or creme, as I do after a clean-up with turpentine.
     
  19. grendel

    grendel Senior member

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    Reno'Mat works great. I've used it to strip old shoes from the thrift store with way too much wax. It takes a bit of elbow grease but it doesn't damage the finish of the leather or strip the dye.
     
  20. nickwjd

    nickwjd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Apr 10, 2012
    I myself use turpentine as well for stripping old wax as I can't easily get my hands on Renomat. Seems to work fine, the leather does appear dry after, but a quick treat with Reno + cream fixes that up nicely. I have also tried lighter fluid as per St Crispin's guide, but I find turpentine to be better.
     

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