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Munky

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I have got the same experience with all my Dainite soles...
Me three. I find my Dainite soles slip on marble (or similar) floors and on pretty much any wet surface. I have yet to find out the point of them. Perhaps I should take a sharp knife to them...;)
 

standaloneprotein

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Some incessantly try bashing Dainite/rubber soles, few even dare claiming the same old fear-mongering that leather soles have more grip. Ultimately, even the more conservative brands have rubber offerings. Who would have thought it?
 

Munky

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Some incessantly try bashing Dainite/rubber soles, few even dare claiming the same old fear-mongering that leather soles have more grip. Ultimately, even the more conservative brands have rubber offerings. Who would have thought it?
It is, perhaps, not a case of bashing all rubber soles, just Dainite ones. Ridgeways, by the same company are, in my experience, excellent rubber soles. They are light but firm and they are great in the wet weather. The most slippery rubber soles, in the wet, are probably crepe ones.

In the end, it is probably down to a number of variables, including at least, shape and size of feet, way of walking and personal experience/preference. Wear what is comfortable, practical and what you like most.
 

Luigi_M

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Me three. I find my Dainite soles slip on marble (or similar) floors and on pretty much any wet surface. I have yet to find out the point of them. Perhaps I should take a sharp knife to them...;)

[Munky's home. Shoes with new leather soles, and a dagger, on the table. Then enters Munky.]

<<If it were done, when ’tis done, then ’twere well
It were done quickly: if some cuts on the sole
Could trammel up the slippery, and catch
With its surcease success; that but this blow
Might be the be-all and the end-all – here,
But here, upon this bank and shoal of time,
We’d jump our safety on wet floors.>>
 

JFWR

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Some incessantly try bashing Dainite/rubber soles, few even dare claiming the same old fear-mongering that leather soles have more grip. Ultimately, even the more conservative brands have rubber offerings. Who would have thought it?
I dont' think it is bashing, so much as different opinions.

Dainite seems to be pretty polarizing. I know some people who I consider very well acquainted great foot wear, like @audog that despise it, whereas I just prefer other options, and some people swear by it.

I do respectfully disagree that dainite is slippery on wet surfaces, though. I primarily wear dainite in wet conditions and it's done nothing but keep the grip on the shoes I have in dainite.
 

JFWR

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Gentlemen, a neetsfoot oil question:

How long should I let the oil soak before doing anything further with my shoes? I used neetsfoot oil on several cordovan pairs to provide some needed conditioning.

Once I have let them condition, I assume it'd be advisable to rigorously brush the shoes as well? And make sure any oil that might not have absorbed has been by running a clean cloth over it to soak up anything that might be sticking to the leather?
 

Munky

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[Munky's home. Shoes with new leather soles, and a dagger, on the table. Then enters Munky.]

<<If it were done, when ’tis done, then ’twere well
It were done quickly: if some cuts on the sole
Could trammel up the slippery, and catch
With its surcease success; that but this blow
Might be the be-all and the end-all – here,
But here, upon this bank and shoal of time,
We’d jump our safety on wet floors.>>
[Noises off. Luigi unboxing to camera.]

Unthrifty loveliness, why dost thou spend
Upon thyself thy rubber legacy?
Nature’s shoe gives nothing but doth lend,
And being frank she lends to the rubber free.

Yours, as ever, Munky.
 

Luigi_M

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"Now is the winter of our dull shoes
Made glorious summer by this shiny wax
And all the clouds that lour'd upon our captoes
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
"

Munky ... may The Bard forgive us!
Yours, in apostasy, Luigi
 

Munky

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"Now is the winter of our dull shoes
Made glorious summer by this shiny wax
And all the clouds that lour'd upon our captoes
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
"

Munky ... may The Bard forgive us!
Yours, in apostasy, Luigi
"I come to polish shoes not to praise them."
Yours in shared scholarship, Munky.
 

standaloneprotein

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It is, perhaps, not a case of bashing all rubber soles, just Dainite ones. Ridgeways, by the same company are, in my experience, excellent rubber soles. They are light but firm and they are great in the wet weather. The most slippery rubber soles, in the wet, are probably crepe ones.

In the end, it is probably down to a number of variables, including at least, shape and size of feet, way of walking and personal experience/preference. Wear what is comfortable, practical and what you like most.
One thing often overlooked is how much plastics and rubbers improved in the last decade. I would not be surprised if Harboro tried different compounds and likely changed it, without us knowing. There are other brands doing similar outsoles as well. I have to admit that having the additional grip gives me more confidence, but I am working from home now so I am just shaking the dust off my dress shoes.
 

NotJeffBagwell

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For a pair of Alden LWBs in burnished tan that have caked on polish that I wish to remove -

Is Saphir Renomat a good option?

Or is Renomat too aggressive?
 

Shawnc

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Just wanted to share some work I put in today on some unlined shells. Finally get to fly so I'm off to see my oldest and his family (which good for me, includes grandchildren). Flying removes my go-to Alden's as the shank means I still have to remove shoes when going through security. Tampa means unlined gets the call so I pulled these out and instantly noticed just how rough the edges, specifically, the area on top of the welt was. Probably spent 20 minutes on the welt alone and while progress was made, I was less than satisfied. Then I remembered that I actually purchased a pretty cheap electric toothbrush just for this reason. Only tried it once and that was over a year ago so I had forgotten about it. Well, it is the perfect tool for hitting that really tough to get at area that sits on top of the edge. No before pic's but trust me, they we're dry as heck. I mean really dry. Here are the after shots.....

20210515_UnlinedEdgeClean3.jpg
20210515_UnlinedEdgeClean2.jpg
20210515_UnlinedEdgeClean4.jpg
20210515_UnlinedEdgeClean1.jpg


For product I started with some VSC, brushed, still not great. Added some mink oil and that made a pretty significant difference. Finished up with some basic Kiwi brown shoe polish. For the shell, nothing but wipe and brush.

Happy Sunday guys......
 

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