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Munky

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Thank you for your comment. You are right, they are not suede boots anymore, they are waxed and they look like a waxed garment prepared for rain and harsh time.

I did all tricks that could be done to recover their original charm but finally, I decided to take another route as it proved impossible: instead of improving, they were going down and I wasn't using them with the same pleasure than before.

Anyway, as I mentioned before, I was aware that this was an experiment that could end in a total botch. Now they will have a different use than before, and I still own other Chelsea's as well as suede shoes.
I think you have done a really good job on these, Mercurio. I know exactly how frustrating it is to put unpleasant stains on your shoes that - whatever you do - don't get hidden or go away. Here, you have shown exactly what can be done to transform a pair of marked shoes. This is an excellent result and the boots look beautiful. Congratulations. Very best wishes, Munky.
 

San780

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Dear all,

I need some guidance and help on a small shoe renovation project that has gone wrong.

I came across a lovely pair of HESCHUNGS plain brown derbies owned by my father (bought in the 90s). They were just thrown in the garage for more than a decade and I stumbled them. Since no shoe trees were used, there was extensive creasing as well as some curling. But the shoes in general were in great shape.

I, thus, decided to use my SF knowledge and renovate them. Cleaned them up, used RENOMAT on them. And then decided to use cotton strips soaked with two parts of water and one part of glycerine on them for 8 hours. Placed shoe trees inside during the process of course. After 8 hours, I removed the strips and put them to dry.

The problem is that the leather has become extremely rough and uneven. There is some small swelling on the leather in different parts of the toe area. It’s like big mosquito bites; at least it looks that way. It seems I have totally messed up the shoes. The shoes are drying now for the last two days. I was wondering if anyone could guide me on how to remove these “bumps”?

Any help in this regard would be highly appreciated

Thank you once again!!

E96D8950-8D76-46F9-8F88-B2969B01870C.jpeg

F7F72830-9106-4BF8-A3D0-E204490EA837.jpeg
 

JFWR

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Dear all,

I need some guidance and help on a small shoe renovation project that has gone wrong.

I came across a lovely pair of HESCHUNGS plain brown derbies owned by my father (bought in the 90s). They were just thrown in the garage for more than a decade and I stumbled them. Since no shoe trees were used, there was extensive creasing as well as some curling. But the shoes in general were in great shape.

I, thus, decided to use my SF knowledge and renovate them. Cleaned them up, used RENOMAT on them. And then decided to use cotton strips soaked with two parts of water and one part of glycerine on them for 8 hours. Placed shoe trees inside during the process of course. After 8 hours, I removed the strips and put them to dry.

The problem is that the leather has become extremely rough and uneven. There is some small swelling on the leather in different parts of the toe area. It’s like big mosquito bites; at least it looks that way. It seems I have totally messed up the shoes. The shoes are drying now for the last two days. I was wondering if anyone could guide me on how to remove these “bumps”?

Any help in this regard would be highly appreciated

Thank you once again!!

View attachment 1465006
View attachment 1465007
That's a real tough one. I don't know.

One way MIGHT be to soak the entire shoe and put in the tightest shoe trees you can manage.
 

San780

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That's a real tough one. I don't know.

One way MIGHT be to soak the entire shoe and put in the tightest shoe trees you can manage.
Thank you for your swift reply. I already soaked them with water/glycerine soaked cotton strips. Do you think totally soaking them and putting shoe trees can rectify the problem? I was wondering if I should use a spoon and some cream on it...
 

JFWR

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Thank you for your swift reply. I already soaked them with water/glycerine soaked cotton strips. Do you think totally soaking them and putting shoe trees can rectify the problem? I was wondering if I should use a spoon and some cream on it...
Are they cordovan? As usually that only works for cordovan.
 

Reiver

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Dear all,

I need some guidance and help on a small shoe renovation project that has gone wrong.

I came across a lovely pair of HESCHUNGS plain brown derbies owned by my father (bought in the 90s). They were just thrown in the garage for more than a decade and I stumbled them. Since no shoe trees were used, there was extensive creasing as well as some curling. But the shoes in general were in great shape.

I, thus, decided to use my SF knowledge and renovate them. Cleaned them up, used RENOMAT on them. And then decided to use cotton strips soaked with two parts of water and one part of glycerine on them for 8 hours. Placed shoe trees inside during the process of course. After 8 hours, I removed the strips and put them to dry.

The problem is that the leather has become extremely rough and uneven. There is some small swelling on the leather in different parts of the toe area. It’s like big mosquito bites; at least it looks that way. It seems I have totally messed up the shoes. The shoes are drying now for the last two days. I was wondering if anyone could guide me on how to remove these “bumps”?

Any help in this regard would be highly appreciated

Thank you once again!!

View attachment 1465006
View attachment 1465007
Hard to be sure but they possibly look saturated. I have never used glycerin so have no idea what effect that has on calf.

I would be tempted to leave them for a week or two, possibly packed tightly with newspaper to absorb any excess moisture.

I certainly wouldn't rush into any other product application.

Letting them dry out may well cause the bumps to settle back down.
 

San780

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Hard to be sure but they possibly look saturated. I have never used glycerin so have no idea what effect that has on calf.

I would be tempted to leave them for a week or two, possibly packed tightly with newspaper to absorb any excess moisture.

I certainly wouldn't rush into any other product application.

Letting them dry out may well cause the bumps to settle back down.
Thank you for your answer. I was indeed thinking about rushing into putting on Rénovateur on it. Glad you pointed it out. At this moment, I’m just hoping that letting it dry down would get these “bumps” to settle down by themselves.

Just wondering if someone had the same issue like this one?
 

JUAN MANUEL

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Thank you for your answer. I was indeed thinking about rushing into putting on Rénovateur on it. Glad you pointed it out. At this moment, I’m just hoping that letting it dry down would get these “bumps” to settle down by themselves.

Just wondering if someone had the same issue like this one?
Take a breathe an let them dry, something similar happened to a pair of cordovan shoes I was using during a very very heavy rain in Brazil. Patience is very important.

Maybe the Vintage shoe thread boys can help you, they are used to experiment with different leathers, they are very friendly and have an ocean of knowledge.

My two cents:have you consider rubbing deer bone? I used it to make even some wrinkling, A Fine Pair of Shoes have them in stock.
 

Reiver

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Take a breathe an let them dry, something similar happened to a pair of cordovan shoes I was using during a very very heavy rain in Brazil. Patience is very important.

Maybe the Vintage shoe thread boys can help you, they are used to experiment with different leathers, they are very friendly and have an ocean of knowledge.

My two cents:have you consider rubbing deer bone? I used it to make even some wrinkling, A Fine Pair of Shoes have them in stock.
Agree, I think just leaving them for at least a week in a dry place may be best at the moment. Adding more products could actually worsen the problem.

Just to clarify @JUAN MANUEL I don't think the shoes in question are cordovan, unless that is you have had success with a deerbone on calf shoes also?

Once the shoes have had plenty drying time to see if the bumps go away, it might then be time to assess if the leather needs conditioning.

Then potentially assess if the surface needs refinishing with dye or just simply a couple of light coats of pigmented cream and maybe a coat of wax polish if the leather appears in decent condition.

Less is usually more I have learned from some bad experiences in the past.
 

San780

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Take a breathe an let them dry, something similar happened to a pair of cordovan shoes I was using during a very very heavy rain in Brazil. Patience is very important.

Maybe the Vintage shoe thread boys can help you, they are used to experiment with different leathers, they are very friendly and have an ocean of knowledge.

My two cents:have you consider rubbing deer bone? I used it to make even some wrinkling, A Fine Pair of Shoes have them in stock.
I must admit that the thought of using a deer bone did cross my mind. I might have one lying around somewhere at my place. Was almost forced upon me while buying Cordovan shoes some years back.
Having said that, these shoes are box calf. My first reaction was that it was bad quality leather. But talking to people around me (for what it’s worth), I’ve been told that the HESCHUNG leather quality back in the 90s was top-notch.

As you mentioned, what is missing on my side is pure and simple patience. I just need to stop looking at these shoes and forget about them for the next two weeks.

Thank you for your advice.
 

San780

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Agree, I think just leaving them for at least a week in a dry place may be best at the moment. Adding more products could actually worsen the problem.

Just to clarify @JUAN MANUEL I don't think the shoes in question are cordovan, unless that is you have had success with a deerbone on calf shoes also?

Once the shoes have had plenty drying time to see if the bumps go away, it might then be time to assess if the leather needs conditioning.

Then potentially assess if the surface needs refinishing with dye or just simply a couple of light coats of pigmented cream and maybe a coat of wax polish if the leather appears in decent condition.

Less is usually more I have learned from some bad experiences in the past.
Duly noted, Sir. Very sound and logical advice. Less is usually more than enough indeed.
 

ZePrez

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I must admit that the thought of using a deer bone did cross my mind. I might have one lying around somewhere at my place. Was almost forced upon me while buying Cordovan shoes some years back.
Having said that, these shoes are box calf. My first reaction was that it was bad quality leather. But talking to people around me (for what it’s worth), I’ve been told that the HESCHUNG leather quality back in the 90s was top-notch.

As you mentioned, what is missing on my side is pure and simple patience. I just need to stop looking at these shoes and forget about them for the next two weeks.

Thank you for your advice.
Treat them with some good leather conditioner, Bick 4 or Lexol Neatsfoot Oil, come to mind. Use some good, tight shoe trees and tell us what happens :). I have come to appreciate the value of patience in shoes.... and other things in life/
 

San780

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Treat them with some good leather conditioner, Bick 4 or Lexol Neatsfoot Oil, come to mind. Use some good, tight shoe trees and tell us what happens :). I have come to appreciate the value of patience in shoes.... and other things in life/
Thank you. As @Reiver mentioned, I’d just wait a good two weeks before hitting them with other products. I’m already using shoe trees which are a size bigger. Will show the progress in two weeks’ time. Thank you once again.
 

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