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troika

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So, Lofgren oil spill update. I tried a bunch of strategies over the weekend and stain removers specifically made for oil stains. They didn't really work and discolored the area around the stain which made it worse. So, as some have said, I threw in the towel.

First, I would like to note, that these were seconds where the right boot (the one with the stain) was slightly darker and more oily than the left (maybe these boots are cursed) so I didn't pay the retail $765 for these. Also, being natural CXL, they are intended to darken with wear and dirt (but maybe not sardine oil).

When I decided to wave the white flag I decided to do it gradually and work up. I started with Bick 4. This darkened it a little but not enough. I then went to Chaimberlain's Leather milk. I liked the color this gave them but after sitting over night, it was absorbed by the leather and no longer hid the stains. I then took out the heavy hitter, Montana's Oil which is a pitch and mink oil blend. This significantly darkened them up and hid the stains. On the plus side, it also hid the raw denim stains that I had already given these boots. I generally don't like "fake patina" but the oil made them look like the 2-3 year old versions of these which I am ok with. An additional benefit is that the darker leather really makes the beautiful stitching that John Lofgren is famous for pop.

I guess I don't have to worry about staining them any more.

View attachment 1415000View attachment 1415001
That looks WAY better than I would have imagined. Can't see any evidence of the stain, and they now have a new killer vibe. Great job! Now go beat them up.
 

Patek

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That looks WAY better than I would have imagined. Can't see any evidence of the stain, and they now have a new killer vibe. Great job! Now go beat them up.
Thanks, they need a good brushing to get the nap back. With all that conditioning and oil, I'm sure I have improved the waterproofing too. I guess natural CXL only briefly looks natural anyway.
 

BoydsShoes

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So, Lofgren oil spill update. I tried a bunch of strategies over the weekend and stain removers specifically made for oil stains. They didn't really work and discolored the area around the stain which made it worse. So, as some have said, I threw in the towel.

First, I would like to note, that these were seconds where the right boot (the one with the stain) was slightly darker and more oily than the left (maybe these boots are cursed) so I didn't pay the retail $765 for these. Also, being natural CXL, they are intended to darken with wear and dirt (but maybe not sardine oil).

When I decided to wave the white flag I decided to do it gradually and work up. I started with Bick 4. This darkened it a little but not enough. I then went to Chaimberlain's Leather milk. I liked the color this gave them but after sitting over night, it was absorbed by the leather and no longer hid the stains. I then took out the heavy hitter, Montana's Oil which is a pitch and mink oil blend. This significantly darkened them up and hid the stains. On the plus side, it also hid the raw denim stains that I had already given these boots. I generally don't like "fake patina" but the oil made them look like the 2-3 year old versions of these which I am ok with. An additional benefit is that the darker leather really makes the beautiful stitching that John Lofgren is famous for pop.

I guess I don't have to worry about staining them any more.

View attachment 1415000View attachment 1415001
Definitely looks better than I would have thought, and the best news is that you don't have to worry about the dreaded natural CXL. With the mink oil, you should be ready for foul weather.
 

Patek

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Definitely looks better than I would have thought, and the best news is that you don't have to worry about the dreaded natural CXL. With the mink oil, you should be ready for foul weather.
Yeah, the tongue was leather (not rough out) so I made sure to hit it with all the above products too in order for the whole thing to darken together.

Hit it with a suede brush between meetings to get some nap back. You can still see the denim stains on the side but they are less pronounced.

IMG_20200629_104247253.jpg
IMG_20200629_103241620.jpg
 

Phoenician

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Been trying to find Saphir shell cordovan creme polish in Navy, to no avail yet, but see Boot Black has it. What’s the consensus on this brand versus Saphir? Thanks for any feedback!
 

Mercurio

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Anyone knows how to care for a deerskin leather shoes? Can I use renovateur to condition it?
Maybe this will help:

"Care For Deerskin Footwear

Deerskin is easy to care for. It will stay soft even after repeatedly getting wet and dry. Because of this it is not necessary to treat it with a protection from water. Many leather protectors will darken the leather and/or affect the breathability of the deerskin. We recommend that you test any leather care products first to insure the results that you desire.

Most soiled spots can be removed by gently hand washing using a mild soap and water. You should always let the leather dry naturally. For grease spots, apply flour or baby powder and let sit 24 hours to absorb grease before brushing off. Repeat if necessary. When needed, a quality shoe cream can be applied to touch up scuff marks"
.

From: https://www.footwearbyfootskins.com/deerskin.aspx
 

nooooobi

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Maybe this will help:

"Care For Deerskin Footwear

Deerskin is easy to care for. It will stay soft even after repeatedly getting wet and dry. Because of this it is not necessary to treat it with a protection from water. Many leather protectors will darken the leather and/or affect the breathability of the deerskin. We recommend that you test any leather care products first to insure the results that you desire.

Most soiled spots can be removed by gently hand washing using a mild soap and water. You should always let the leather dry naturally. For grease spots, apply flour or baby powder and let sit 24 hours to absorb grease before brushing off. Repeat if necessary. When needed, a quality shoe cream can be applied to touch up scuff marks"
.

From: https://www.footwearbyfootskins.com/deerskin.aspx
Thanks!
 

JFWR

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Been trying to find Saphir shell cordovan creme polish in Navy, to no avail yet, but see Boot Black has it. What’s the consensus on this brand versus Saphir? Thanks for any feedback!
Not even sure if saphir makes cordovan cream in navy blue, given that navy blue is such a rare cordovan colour that I don't imagine most people would use it, unless they were doing it for black to get super glossy.

Anyway, boot black is basically same or better than Saphir but at an even steeper price point. Boot black is stupid expensive, but they're definitely superior grade.
 

Mercurio

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Last edited:

Phoenician

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Not even sure if saphir makes cordovan cream in navy blue, given that navy blue is such a rare cordovan colour that I don't imagine most people would use it, unless they were doing it for black to get super glossy.

Anyway, boot black is basically same or better than Saphir but at an even steeper price point. Boot black is stupid expensive, but they're definitely superior grade.
thanks very much for the feedback. Good to hear it’s that good, and it’s certainly tough to find the shell creme in navy. Found a site overseas that has it for 15 euros which is fair, but that much in shipping which when combined, brings it to the stupid expensive realm for sure.
 

DapperAndy

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Anyone knows how to care for a deerskin leather shoes? Can I use renovateur to condition it?
Deerskin is mammal skin leather, so it has pores. While it remains supple, it will still need conditioning (all oils oxidize over time) and protection. It is often more thin than calfskin, and can darken from too-strong solvents or heavy still-oils. There are gentle conditioners that are veg-tan safe you can use. Cream polishes can offer scuff protection and color stability. Hopefully that helps!
 

JFWR

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Prices are not so different to Saphir, as you can verify at their shop:


At the Cobbler Union online shoe care shop, you can compare prices as they sell both brands, Saphir and Boot Black:

https://www.cobbler-union.com/collections/shoe-care
BB is 35 for 85 g, Saphir is 23 for 75 ml. Assuming 1 gram = 1 ML, then Saphir is clearly the better price. Like, by and away. This is also true on Shoe Shine Site on Ebay (boot black shop's ebay site).

Even if we use the BB for 18 at 55 g (doesn't seem to be their top one, like Pommadier is for Saphir) that'd put the BB still at 26 compared to 23. At that point, compare BDC Saphir which would be half that price.

Plus, you have BB products like wax and such that require two different waxes.
 

DGC

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This might be a long shot. I found an old pair of John Lobb's and the suede has rubbed off around the toe and tongue. I'm thinking of using a dark brown dye all over to make it less obvious? Any ideas what could be done would be appreciated.

Thanks

IMG_6309.JPG
 

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