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valet

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I just purchased a new pair of EGs, but before I wear them, I am wondering whether flush toe plates are necessary. If there is a clear advantage in terms of protecting the sole or making it last longer, I'll pay my cobbler a visit before wearing them.
 

florent

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I just purchased a new pair of EGs, but before I wear them, I am wondering whether flush toe plates are necessary. If there is a clear advantage in terms of protecting the sole or making it last longer, I'll pay my cobbler a visit before wearing them.
It depends on the way you walk. If you tend to wear down the toe part prematurely, then yes toe plates will extend the soles life.
 

valet

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I know that the wisdom is not to wear leather-soled dress shoes in the rain, but there doesn't seem to be much written about how to treat them if they do indeed get soaked during an unexpected downpour, and how to best prepare dress shoes for such a downpour. Any ideas?
 

eTrojan

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Hi everyone. Recently bought a second hand pair of dress shows from Enzo Bonafe. The pair is great but the previous owner put wayy too much shoe cream on. I used saphir renomat to take it of but it just keeps coming off. Every time i use a new piece of cloth, put renomat on and rub, the cloth is dirty after 10 second and i feel like i could o this 100 times but i am afraid this would damage the leather. Also the shoe polish colour isn’t the best match, so that’s why i want it off. Any experience regarding how many times you can go over the residu shoe cream with renomat?
I find that a couple rounds of vigorous lathering with saddle soap (Fiebings) can remove a lot of extra polish. Then you can evaluate how much more aggressive you want to be.

I know some people do not think saddle soap is good for shoes, but I have had good results and know that several well regarded cobblers feel it is fine.
 

DapperAndy

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I find that a couple rounds of vigorous lathering with saddle soap (Fiebings) can remove a lot of extra polish. Then you can evaluate how much more aggressive you want to be.

I know some people do not think saddle soap is good for shoes, but I have had good results and know that several well regarded cobblers feel it is fine.
Saddle Soap can be fine for removing old polish build-up, but it has glycerine in it. So you’ll then need to remove the glycerine from the pores of your leather before you build back up with good products. Sometimes a more gentle cleaner/conditioner product can do that necessary second step.
 

Reiver

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I find that a couple rounds of vigorous lathering with saddle soap (Fiebings) can remove a lot of extra polish. Then you can evaluate how much more aggressive you want to be.

I know some people do not think saddle soap is good for shoes, but I have had good results and know that several well regarded cobblers feel it is fine.
Never had a problem with saddle soap personally. I rarely find I need to use it and when I do it tends to be on my more rugged footwear though. I always condition afterwards
 

Reiver

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I know that the wisdom is not to wear leather-soled dress shoes in the rain, but there doesn't seem to be much written about how to treat them if they do indeed get soaked during an unexpected downpour, and how to best prepare dress shoes for such a downpour. Any ideas?
I think leather soles wear much faster when soaked, otherwise I think its just a case of letting them naturally dry out afterwards.

I have seen it advised to leave shoes on their sides to allow soles to dry more effectively.

As with all leather avoid drying with a heat source.

I try to avoid wearing leather soles when expecting rain but living in England it's definitely never guaranteed to be dry!
 

DWFII

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That would be absurd even if a fungus had killed him. It didn't - the experts say he died of pneumonia. Nail infections are not lethal, but by constructing a bizarre argument that they are, you've made yourself look like a troll or a nutjob. Which is a great shame - your shoemaking expertise makes you a star of this thread. But now you've wrecked your credibility with your pretence at medical expertise.
From the National Geographic article dwf linked, a direct quote seems to be more supportive of my view. But, I encourage any to read it for themselves. Here’s just a snippet:

“We don't know of even a single case of either an archaeologist or a tourist experiencing any negative consequences [from tomb molds or bacteria]," Miller said. The University of Pennsylvania's Wegner hasn't noticed much concern among her colleagues at tomb sites.
"On the archaeological projects that I've been involved with, we generally don't wear masks or [other protection against hazardous materials] in a tomb," she explained. "If we do, it's because of worry about breathing in dust rather than molds or fungus.
"If someone has a compromised immune system, they might be more [likely] to pick up something in a tomb, but that's also the case in a restaurant or anywhere else they might be."


FWIW, check this out...In the light of which, I guess not knowing of a "single case" is simply another instance of "see no evil...". Lot of that not knowing going on...

It was later discovered that Jade was suffering from a rare but serious fungal infection called mucormycosis. Mucormycetes, a group of molds often found in soil, compost piles and animal feces, cause mucormycosis infections. Though these molds are present in the environment, those whose immune systems are compromised are more at risk for contracting an infection.

“It most commonly affects the sinuses or the lungs after inhaling fungal spores from the air, or the skin after the fungus enters the skin through a cut, burn, or other type of skin injury,” the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states.

The infection reportedly “ate away” at Jade’s throat, lungs, and airways, and caused tissues in her body to go through necrosis, what's defined as the irreversible “death of body tissue."
Just thought some would rather know....
 

Rnt

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I find that a couple rounds of vigorous lathering with saddle soap (Fiebings) can remove a lot of extra polish. Then you can evaluate how much more aggressive you want to be.

I know some people do not think saddle soap is good for shoes, but I have had good results and know that several well regarded cobblers feel it is fine.
Thanks!
 

stephenaf2003

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FWIW, check this out...In the light of which, I guess not knowing of a "single case" is simply another instance of "see no evil...". Lot of that not knowing going on...



Just thought some would rather know....
:tinfoil:....lol
 

TS2404

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Does anyone happen to have an MSDS for Venetian Shoe Cream handy? My parcel forwarder has requested one but my Google-searching has come up empty. I will contact the manufacturer but have seen MSDS for other products posted in this thread so thought this might be quicker. Thanks in advance
 

yengli

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fairly new to good shoe care. As I was trying to get a good polish I was left with a dull spot that was impossible to properly shine. I am wondering if anyone knows how to get the shine back on my shoe! I think I accidentally removed a layer after saddle soaping and using renomat. I tried to photograph the dull spot
 

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BXpress

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fairly new to good shoe care. As I was trying to get a good polish I was left with a dull spot that was impossible to properly shine. I am wondering if anyone knows how to get the shine back on my shoe! I think I accidentally removed a layer after saddle soaping and using renomat. I tried to photograph the dull spot
Renovateur should put the shine on them. I had the same thing after i removed a poor attempt at mirror shine going a bit too wild on Renomat. Renovateur worked very well.
 

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