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ShoeWho

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Actually they could probably be radically improved with Saphir Creme Renovatrice. The damage would be largely concealed such that it wouldn't be apparent to anyone unless they look closely.
 

walkinginplace

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Folks, I have a slow moving shoe disaster going on with my AE Strands. There is significant cracking on the inside forefoot of both shoes. There is orange underneath it.

These were my very first Goodyear-welted shoe purchase about two years ago, but they have seen little wear. In fact, I have stored them with shoe trees and cleaned/conditioned/polished them about 2-3 times since purchase.

Unfortunately, they are factory seconds and came with a very minor cracking spot. This has since blossomed into the abomination below. My budget remains fairly limited and I very much want to avoid worsening the situation. The two cobblers in town that I've talked to have been of no help and, honestly, seemed pretty clueless.

Please help 😥

1204364


1204365
1204367
 

ShoeWho

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Ermahgerd. My instinct would be the nuclear option - strip the finish right off with Renomat and, if necessary, acetone. Then lay down a new finish with dye, shoe cream and polish. This could be a disaster and might not last long. But I'd do it anyway, as an educational project. But for the price of the materials for this project you could probably buy at least one pair of better quality used shoes on ebay, and save yourself many, many hours of work and lots of mess.
 

walkinginplace

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As much as I appreciate the advice, there is no way I could successfully pull that big of a project off. Any idea of what even happened? It's very demoralizing.
 

ShoeWho

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No idea really. I've seen something similar, but only on a forty year old pair of boots which I restored. Leather varies so much that it's hard to say anything definite just by looking at photos. Given that the shoes are 2 years old and have had little wear and lots of love, I'd guess there's a manufacturing fault. But I'm a rank amateur - hopefully one of the professionals who inhabit this thread will be along soon. In your place I would definitely email some photos to the manufacturer. You could be very polite and say that, as the shoes were sold as seconds you understand that there's no question of blame or liability, but you're very curious and would like their opinion.
 

ShoeWho

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As far as a remedy goes, I think your simplest, cheapest option is darkening them with shoe cream and polish. Lots of thin layers, with a day to dry between each layer. Light or mid-brown shoes are so difficult to fix when they get faulty - you tend to get a patchy finish unless you put in a lot of time and effort. Go for very dark brown or black. The cracks will hopefully become almost invisible.
 

DWFII

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As much as I appreciate the advice, there is no way I could successfully pull that big of a project off. Any idea of what even happened? It's very demoralizing.
The leather is heavily 'finished'. And that finish is actually an acrylic 'paint.' From what I can see in the photos, the paint is what is cracking, not the leather...although I would not be surprised if the leather weren't cracking as well or at least not far behind.

Part of what makes this happen and why it seems to be localized is that manufacturers tend to cut the components of a shoe with a large hydraulic press...often cutting a stack of hides simultaneously.

They also tend to put differing (lower?) grades of leather in 'non-critical' places.

So those two factors are at work her --a relatively stiff finish and a relatively soft substrate.

All manufacturers do this...or some variation of it...but the larger volume, lower priced makers tend to be a bit more blase' about the consequences.
 

Redbike

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If I were to guess, I'd say these shoes are constructed of top grain leather and the finish is raising from the shoe. I don't know that there is a cost-effective remedy that will resolve the issue. Perhaps a trained cobbler could advise you (not the young guy at the local shoe bar!!).
 

The Heat

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Has anyone else used Saphir Beaute de Cuir Brown (04)?
I used some for the first time today, and I noticed on the polishing rag it seemed to have a pretty strong red tint?
Here's what I'm talking about:
(left to right: Saphir 04 - Melatonin brick - Angelus brown) (incidentally, I think the Angeluss also has a red tint to it?)
20190709_205003.jpg


Am I crazy? Are these going to give my shoes a reddish tint?
 

orlylow

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Thanks everyone.

What brand are these? I would agree with coloring the cracks and then polish the shoes.
They're a pair of Loake

Actually they could probably be radically improved with Saphir Creme Renovatrice. The damage would be largely concealed such that it wouldn't be apparent to anyone unless they look closely.
Will give this a shot!
 
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I feel really bad for the Loakes and the AEs, but the quality of leather seems to be the culprit. The cheapest solution would be to polish over the damaged areas over and over to at least give it a 'distressed' look.
 

Munky

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I feel really bad for the Loakes and the AEs, but the quality of leather seems to be the culprit. The cheapest solution would be to polish over the damaged areas over and over to at least give it a 'distressed' look.
Bear in mind, perhaps, that - at least the Loakes and I suspect the AEs - discussed above - are made of corrected grain leather (see DW's message, above}. Corrected grain will not absorb any amount of cream or polish. All you can do with 'polishing' corrected grain is to make it look more shiny. Once the surface has cracked, nothing more can be done. You can try to cover up the damage - although I wouldn't know why you would want to do this - or consider buying another pair of shoes. If you like Loake shoes, their 1880 range is a bit more expensive but the shoes are the real deal and not corrected grain. With the 1880's you can apply cream and polish and both will be absorbed by the leather. However, go easy on the amount of these products that you use.

There seems to be little point in stripping corrected grain shoes. It will only take you back to the leather underneath the 'correction'. The reason that some shoes are made from corrected grain is that the finish covers lower grade leather. Taking off the top level of acrylic, won't leave you with a decent pair of shoes.

Very best wishes, Munky.
 
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ShoeWho

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Agreed.

I'm no good at identifying corrected grain from photos, so if I've wrongly assumed normal leather, please ignore my rescue tips. My only advice for corrected grain is to steer clear of it.
 

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