**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Hoofit

    Hoofit Senior member

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    Any suggestions on how to put the flap down on this leather? Is it possilble to super glue together? Any suggestions are appreciated.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. kirbya

    kirbya Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    Hoofit -

    The Saphir Renovating Recolorant Repair Cream is exactly what you are looking for. It is a resin-based cream that is nothing but resin and pigment. It will seal the crack, rebuild it, and recolor it. Not something you would use on a large surface, but designed exactly for small damage that breaks the leather. Given the picture, I would suggest BURGUNDY (available in 14 different colors).

    You apply it with your finger, rubbing it into the leather in the affected area. Allow it to dry then come on top of it with some Saphir Pommadier Cream Polish.

    Let me know how it goes.


    ALSO... we are getting rid of our remaining Alfred Sargent Special Order shoes... for $550 a pair. Only five pairs available. Check them out here.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2012
  3. kirbya

    kirbya Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    [​IMG] [​IMG] Here you can see the damage to my shoe. I'm not exactly sure how it happened. What's important is that because it gouged into the leather a simple Saphir Pommadier Cream is not going to do the trick. So, this is where the Saphir Renovating Repair Cream comes into play. The resin-based formula is very simple. Resin + Pigment. It fills any cracks, rebuilds the surface, and will never come off. Once it dries, it will never rub off onto anything. [​IMG] [​IMG] You apply the Repair Cream with your finger. Massage it into the leather and try to smooth it out. Allow it to dry. Then polish over it with a cream polish to smooth out the surface. [​IMG] [​IMG] As you can see from the last picture, the Renovating Repair Cream was able to almost completely conceal the damage. For $11, it's cheaper than a pair of shoes and is also EXCELLENT as Edge Dressing. Hope this helps. Cheers, Kirby
     
  4. yywwyy

    yywwyy Senior member

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    Can someone direct me to the post-# of a popular, effective method to obtain a mirror shine? This thread is freaking huge!
     
  5. UglyJoe

    UglyJoe Well-Known Member

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    Do you one better.


    Practice this, everything else is just personal preference and trial and error.
     
  6. paskaldjay

    paskaldjay Active Member

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    Does anyone have tried La Cordonnerie Anglaise Shoe Cream? The jar looks like the old 100mL Saphir Cream though.

    [​IMG]

    A beeswax based cream, a LARGE amount they said. Is this just a rebranded Saphir version? Anything about this LCA cream is likely fit the Saphir Cream
     
  7. yywwyy

    yywwyy Senior member

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    That looks....so easy..... but I suspect not. Thanks so much for that video.
    What is the type of polish he's using? Do you have any videos of general wax-polishing the rest of the shoe as well?
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2012
  8. david3558

    david3558 Senior member

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    HOLY COW that is amazing haha, I need to learn this. @Kirbya, I've got some semi-deep cuts on the toe of my Alden captoe (calf) think that stuff could do the trick?
     
  9. UglyJoe

    UglyJoe Well-Known Member

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    Not sure on the polish. I use Saphir or Kiwi, no real preference for either one, although the Saphir is a little smoother out of the tin, imo. I don't have any videos for the rest of the shoe. Don't try to bull anywhere but the toe and maybe the heel. Anywhere else will just lead to micro-fractures of the wax and won't look good at all. You can google a zillion different videos on the rest of the shoe. A good reference that has worked well for me is the hanger project's guide. http://www.hangerproject.com/closet/presidential-shine/

    Start from step 3 and you'll be fine, unless the shoes are in need of major TLC.
     
  10. UglyJoe

    UglyJoe Well-Known Member

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    Are the cuts actually in the leather or just the polish/wax? If the latter then you don't need anything but a good polish. If the cuts are very slightly into the leather then bulling will also usually do the trick.
     
  11. yywwyy

    yywwyy Senior member

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  12. UglyJoe

    UglyJoe Well-Known Member

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    I'll add a couple of things to that video that have worked well for me. You can use water or spit, if you are so inclined. I prefer spit simply because I have an easier time controlling the amount of moisture I get into the mix. Some swear that the enzymes in the spit break down the wax a bit and help it smooth out and set faster. YMMV. After bulling, there will be excess wax that needs to be buffed off... but if you immediately go at it, I always seem to have a problem getting the mirror to shine. So I bull as in the video till I get a nice mirror, then I set the shoes aside and let them dry for a while. 5 minutes at least, and I think Lear has even suggested leaving them overnight. After the wax has a chance to set, I brush and buff with a cloth, and the mirror comes right back up. Nice thing is maintenance is easy. Once the mirror (or kasumi mirror if you prefer) is set, then every couple of wears just hit the shoe with some Saphir Renovateur and buff back up to a shine. No need to bull every shining session.
     
  13. yywwyy

    yywwyy Senior member

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    Appreciate your description. That sounds awesome. Will definitely give it a try over this weekend, since I have most of the required stuff from Saphir.
     
  14. kirbya

    kirbya Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    The Saphir Renovating Repair Cream is the only thing better than polish. So if polish won't do the trick, it's the only other option. It's quite effective and it should do the trick.
    I'm currently working on a high-gloss shine guide. But, man, does it take a long time. I spent 45 minutes last weekend just stripping my last finish with the Saphir Reno'Mat. Now I have a beautiful, unfinished pair of shoes that will probably require an hour or two to really build up a mirror. I had an opportunity to spend some time with Paul Bolten of Glacagechaussures.com while in Paris (probably one of the preeminent "patina" artist in the world) and he showed me some great tips and techniques to really create a knock-out mirror finish. Two big take-aways is (1) that you have to pull off any silicones from the leather in order for the pours to accept the polish. That means that if you have used any Kiwi, you need to strip it with the Saphir Reno'Mat. (2) that you really spend quite a bit of time (45 seconds to a minute) rubbing and massaging the polish into the grain of the shoe... then allow it to dry before applying the next coat of polish. In order to build the wax finish up, thereby creating the "mirror" shine, you have to apply many, many coats of wax polish while allow it to dry so that the layers accumulate. Hoping to experiment today or this weekend.
     
  15. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Saphir is very flexible and translucent. Venetian is not translucent, even when used sparingly, it leaves white residue at the creases, none of my Saphir does. I think the only reason why Nick Horween recommends it is because it is made in Chicago where Horween is also located. I think he is biased. People like it on Cordovan because cordovan doesn't really crease, it rolls and bends so you aren't really seeing how it behaves when it dries. Saphir just behaves better in my experience.
     

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