1. Welcome to our newest affiliate vendor, Uni/form LA. We are very happy to welcome our newest affiliate vendor, UNI/FORM LA, a brand focused on improving the clothing you wear everyday. Their elevated essentials are handmade in LA and built for daily wear. Please help me give them a warm welcome in their new thread.

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Hasselmannen

    Hasselmannen Active Member

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    I used Saphir Renovateur. I did this on a pair of boots recently. I was amazed how much old polish that endes up on my cloth.
    I sent over twice, and then let dry for 24 hours.

    Happy to hear what others have to say about this, maybe there are better alternatives.
     

  2. josef1

    josef1 Senior Member

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    Maybe not sanding as that might make it worse. Saphir has this great product called Renovating Repair Cream that comes in a tube. It's basically pigment and resin that acts like a putty for filling in cracks and scratches. I've tried this with great success on permanent stains on a pair of tan shoes. Hard to match colors but you shouldn't have a problem using black on black. I would do my aforementioned renovateur and cream polish then fill in the deeper cracks with the repair cream. Try to YouTube "the hanger project" about this product as well :)

    Renovateur doesnt completely pull polish off. I would suggest using Saphir Renomat. When I shifted my shoe care kit to all Saphir. I pulled all the old polish off my shoes with Renomat and had no problems at all with the finish. It was quite fun starting from scratch. Try it on a small portion first though and use sparingly.
     

  3. mosy

    mosy Distinguished Member

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    Thanks guys.
    I’m a bit hesisatent to use Renomat because of how strong the stuff is. Don’t want to breathe it in, etc.
    I guess I’ll start with Renovateur and see if I get the desired results. If not I’ll move on to Renomat.
     

  4. Sehn82

    Sehn82 Active Member

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    Cracked leather is definitely a sign that it is very dry. I'd first go with a conditioning product. Something like Bick 4, Lexol etc. Use light coats and leave it to dry for the leather to absorb. You might need to repeat depending on how dry the leather is.

    After the leather suppleness has returned, take a few photos and see how the cracks look like. They should smoothen out a little after conditioning. You will probably need to run a black shoe cream to fill in the colour on the crack lines. This may or may not involve some light sanding to "flatten the surface". I generally don't recommend buying used shoes with cracked leather as some cracks can't be fixed if too "deep". They will affect comfort as well since the shoe tends to flex at the crack lines.
     

  5. mddimi

    mddimi Member

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    I while back I wrote about potential fake saphir cream that I bought on ebay. Now I'm certain it was fake. First of, my shoes were very shiny when I bought them. I used STORE BOUGTH saphir cream light brown although they are dark. They were still very shiny with no effort. Then I bought dark brown on ebay, used it and I can't reach that shine not even with much more effort. Consistency is different then the store bought and especially the smell. I thought maybe every color smells different but then I smelled them in a store. They don't. So beware.
    Also I wanted advise. I now bought saphir pate de luxe. May I use it over this fake cream or do I have to clean the shoes from all the ceram first. If so, how do I do that? With renovateur?
     

  6. mddimi

    mddimi Member

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    I meant reno mat.
     

  7. Luigi_M

    Luigi_M Senior Member

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    Mine is just the "average Joe" opinion but, since you don't know what your fake Saphir was made of, you might want to completely remove it from your shoes ...
    This is the first time I second the use of Renomat, but I think that circumstances justify a derogation (sorry @Munky - and please for this time don't call me an apostate)!
     

  8. Munky

    Munky Distinguished Member

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    Luigi, I fear that further mention of Renomat, by you, will trigger a 3 year ban. With very best wishes and kind regards, Munky. :colgate: I hope you are well and enjoying life, in general and your shoes in particular!
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2018

  9. Luigi_M

    Luigi_M Senior Member

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    @Munky ... immediately after posting, my eyes opened and I realized my sin:eek:.
    Now I'm kneeling on gravel as I write 1000 times "Renomat ees bada fo' ye shooza" :D
    All good here! This thread has somehow freezed - should think something to heat it up a bit.
    All the best! Luigi.
     

  10. saskatoonjay

    saskatoonjay Senior Member

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    The vintage Florsheim Imperial plain toe bluchers I just got off eBay have toe depressions in the footbed that don’t match where my toes go. It’s uncomfortable. Can I fix it?
     

  11. saskatoonjay

    saskatoonjay Senior Member

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    @DWFII tells me that I could damage my feet by wearing vintage shoes with footbed imprints that clash with my own feet. What’s the cure? Selling the shoes? Having a cobbler replace the cork?
     

  12. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    What I'm saying...first and foremost..is that it could "potentially" damage your feet. And it might not even hurt. Think about it--it only stands to reason. If the toe depressions are not in the same place as where your toes want to be, that means that the joint depressions (the ball of the foot) are likely not in the same place as where your ball joint wants to be. It's a lot like moving a house and trying to put it on a foundation that is either too small or too large for the house.

    Is there a cure for this problem on this shoe? I dunno. It depends on several things: First, what would satisfy you? What definition of "cure" is going to be good enough? And second, how the shoe is made.

    Many people have never been correctly fit in their lives, sometimes not even within a full size. And it doesn't matter--their physiology is less sensitive to pain or physical discomfort and damage may never manifest until years down the line. Or maybe even never. And some people will just put up with pain. And others just don't care about "potential" problems...preferring to deal with them later. Women are a good example in this regard...they wear high heeled shoes and never experience enough pain and discomfort to stop. Yet all the time their foot is in that position, the ligaments and muscles are breaking down. Years later they find that they have fallen metatarsal arches, hammer toes and bunions. [shrug]

    If a shoe has a good leather insole, nothing short of replacing the insole will fix the problems entirely...or correctly. Replacing the cork will not un-compress the leather under those depressions. Virtually nothing can do that.

    Perhaps you could wet the insole thoroughly and let it dry. This may plump up the insole some but I suspect it will have a tendency to re-compress rather quickly--the insole, once broken in to one person's foot, "remembers" and is more easily compressed in those areas already compressed. Same thing with creases in the shoe. And ultimately, not much will be gained.

    Additionally, wetting the insole is an invitation to mold.

    You could also wet the shoe thoroughly and then wear it till it is dry. Better solution but same potential for mold.

    I could say the best "cure" is to sell them and never do that again. :cool: But I've yet to meet the "thrifter" who was willing to entertain that idea, much less implement it.

    Beyond that, I don't know what to tell you. All I can do is share the knowledge I've gained over many years making shoes. Take it for what it's worth.

    PS...and neither here nor there...I tried to start a "conversation" (private mail) with you earlier but I suspect you may have conversations turned off
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2018

  13. saskatoonjay

    saskatoonjay Senior Member

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    Thanks for sharing what you know. You’re very generous.

    I do use private conversations; I’m not sure why yours didn’t get through.
     

  14. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Thank you for the kind words. I'm glad if it helped.

    Yr. Hmb. Svt.

    PS..."conversations" are now working. :fonz:
     

  15. Nick V.

    Nick V. Distinguished Member Dubiously Honored

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    A competent cobbler can insert a last inside the shoe, then remove the out-sole and cork foot-bed. That exposes the underside of the insole. At that point you can see where the "highs" of the foot-bed are. That's caused by cork migrating to the areas that are exposed to less pressure from the bottom of your foot. Conversely, the "lows" are created and shifted to areas that are exposed to more pressure of your foot. It's sort of like a bubbling effect. The insole is sprayed with a solvent which makes the leather more pliable. Then, scraps of leather are nailed through the insole into the last. They act as sort of a clamp. The shoes are left to dry AT LEAST overnight. When the insole has fully dried the leather scraps are removed. You can see that the insole has "flattened out" much more than it was. Following that, a new cork foot-bed is applied then, the sole attached.
    As mentioned it won't be perfect but from my experience much improved.
     

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