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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Luigi_M

    Luigi_M Senior Member

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    @Munky ... once I read that Steve McQueen was known as "The King of Cool" but you are seriously challenging him!
    What are you wearing your blue shoes with?
    Yours - curious - Luigi.
     


  2. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior Member

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    I thought you were quite a conservative guy Munky!
     


  3. Luigi_M

    Luigi_M Senior Member

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    @thefastlife ... first and foremost, kill the moron. This will give you the necessary peace of mind to front the restoration of your boots.
    You did well wiping them with a damp rag, but the risk is that some (I presume) alcohol in the liquid attacked the finish. This you will only be able to tell when the leather has thoroughly dried. If so, you will need some good shoe cream of the same colour of your boots to restore an uniform finish. Apply it really really really sparingly: better repeat applications many times, until you are satisfied, than overdo and create patches.
    DISCLAIMER: that's what I would do to my shoes, but the real expert regularly visiting this thread is Benhour, so you might want he to chime in with his advice.
    Good luck, Luigi.
     


  4. Munky

    Munky Distinguished Member

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    @Luigi. Despite wholecuts being considered formal shoes, I wear mine only with casual clothes - particularly with black jeans. I haven't worn a suit for 10 years. If my wife would allow it, I would buy another two pairs of these shoes, in different colours.

    @EnglishShoes. Not that conservative! I have Trickers in red, green and blue. I also have three pairs of Doc Marten shoes and a pair of their boots. I have 14 fedora hats in different shades and colours.

    I do worry, though, about what people seem to put on their shoes and what they are prepared to do to them. Brushing and occasional polish seems good enough for me. Yours, with all good wishes, Munky.
     


  5. LLEE

    LLEE Member

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    Munky, love the shoe. I'd love to add some brighter, fun colours. Red and green would be pretty.
     


  6. kevenmee

    kevenmee Well-Known Member

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    My apologies for the dumb question, but seeing some weird grain on my Alden shell. Any advice on how to best clean this up? Will I need to remove the finish with some reno'mat?

    [​IMG]
     


  7. george325

    george325 Active Member

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    I have a few normal scuffs on my shoes, nothing major. However, I can't seem to remove them, even the smallest scuff. I've searched and read a bunch of threads and the normal advice is to polish and buff. I've tried applying Allen Edmonds Premium Polish in the matching color of my shoes (which is more of a shoe cream) and letting it set in over night and then buffing with a horsehair brush, but nothing seems to work. Do I need to use a cloth to buff as well or maybe use wax polish as well?
     


  8. bik2101

    bik2101 Senior Member

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    any tips on what I can do for these? I first thought it was a bad polish job so I went with an application of renomat but that doesn't seem to have helped much.

    2018-01-15 18.50.52.jpg

    2018-01-15 18.51.05.jpg
     


  9. LLEE

    LLEE Member

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    IMG_1113.JPG IMG_1115.JPG Hey Gentlemen,
    I've picked up a pair of Peter Feeney shoes. *Disclaimer* I bought these second hand. They appear to have been worn minimally, and I'm unsure if they were bespoke or one of their MTO offerings; I'd usually not even consider a shoe made for someone else's foot specifically, but they fit too well and are too pretty to have been left behind.
    There is a little tear in the sole covering the stitching. Just wondering if this is common on a (I believe) Blake sole, or if this would have been damaged by some incident? Can I get away with a bit of super glue to close it up and not think twice about it, or could this indicate an inherent fragility? Thank you.
     


  10. takashi78

    takashi78 Senior Member

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    Have something i cannot figure out.
    I live in Asia with hot and humid weather.

    I use a wooden shoe cabinet with doors but i keep it open at all times.
    As of late i found mold growing on the leather shoes (calf and shell) and also on parts of the side and bottom of the sole.

    I brushed them off, took out the layers of the rack and put them under the sun for a few hours.

    1- But it seems to come back, very slightly on a few pairs....on the side of the soles after 2months....
    what could be the problem here?
    2- All shoes have cedar shoe trees in them.
    3- Any way to prevent future occurance?
     


  11. JohnAAG

    JohnAAG Senior Member

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    Hi
    It's also consistantly hot and humid where I live and I've had the same problem in the past. I believe there are two things to consider:

    1. In this type of climate, mold is just something we are always going to be fighting. Not just on shoes but also on clothes.

    2. I'm not sure how often you are conditioning your shoes, but given the humidity, the leather will require much less conditioning than in a drier climate.

    What I did:

    1. Since mold is a spore, once it gets into the pores of the leather, it can be difficult to remove. Brushing alone probably won't do it. So as soon as I saw mold, I used a mild solution of anti-bacterial soap and water and gently cleaned the shoes (upper, interior and sole) with a soft brush. Wipe the shoe with a damp cloth to remove all soap residue and then wipe dry. Let them air dry and then condition them.

    2. I bought a cheap dehumidifier and I use that in the closet where I keep my shoes and clothes.

    3. Once a month I set my shoes out in the sun for a couple of hours.

    4. I condition my shoes much less than I did before. About once every 6 months, depending on the leather and frequency of wear.

    5. You may want to consider buying a UV shoe sanitizer to kill any remaining fungus lurking in the hard to reach places inside the shoe. I haven't got one yet, but it's on my "want" list.

    So far, using steps 1 to 4 has really helped reduce mold problems for me.

    Hope that helps!

    John
     


  12. takashi78

    takashi78 Senior Member

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    I don't condition my shoes often, most are shell, just brush, the only shell shoes i did condition with Venetian was 3yrs old at the time.

    I think i will set my shoe out in the sun more often.

    UV shoe sanitizer....interesting...any recommendations?
     


  13. Nick V.

    Nick V. Distinguished Member Dubiously Honored

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    I answered this in the shoe repair thread. Your's is a more simple fix. There is not enough body on the torn area to warrant any sanding. Rubber cement will work fine. They appear to be Goodyear welted and stitched. Possibly hand welted. I doubt Blake though.

    Here is what I posted in the shoe repair thread. Not all applies in your case but a more detailed post:

    It appears that the shoes were stitched using the blind (closed -or- hidden) stitched method. If that's the case take very fine sand paper and lightly sand the underside of the flap that lifted. Also sand the sole in the adjoining area. Be very careful to avoid sanding the sole STITCHING. Using rubber cement apply a thin coat to both sanded areas. Let the cement set (based on the instructions included with the cement). Using both of your thumbs press both cemented sides together so that both sides adhere to one another. If you can, with the shoe upside down, rest the top of the welt on the edge of a table and LIGHTLY tap the cemented area down with a hammer. This will ensure a stronger bond. At that point some of the cement (even the edge of the flap) may appear over the edge of the sole. Sand the rough edges and treat them with sole and edge dressing. I was never a fan of blind stitching. Some say that it prevents dirt and grime from getting embedded in the stitching creating a possibility of slicing the stitching.That VS open channeled. I don't subscribe to that logic at all. Being in NYC the sidewalks and streets are littered with such detrimental debris. To see that sort of happening occur is so rare it's not worth alarming customers about. On the other hand, it's far more common that a customer will bring in a shoe that was blind stitched with the very problem that you have experienced. They often comment that they think the shoe was built defectively. That's not the case, it's just the nature of blind stitching. Further, it's also common that the flap that covers the blind stitch wears through at the strike point of the sole. It could be in the toe area, also common at the lateral point at the ball of your foot either inside -or- out depending on your gait. The flap on the edges is very thin. When it wears out in any of those areas the sole stitches become exposed leading to the same concerns of some, that grime will tear the stitching. So, in reality what purpose does blind stitching really serve? I'm not saying that there is anything wrong with blind stitching construction. I'll even add that it's a lot cleaner looking finish than open channel. I just question the TRUE value of it.
    JMO........

    www.bnelsonshoes.com
     


  14. LLEE

    LLEE Member

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    Thank you! Rubber cement it is, will get on that. If these are GYW, these would have to have been bespoke. Kind of shocked they were up for sale in that case, but I digress.
     


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