**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. BostonHedonist

    BostonHedonist Senior member

    Messages:
    1,692
    Likes Received:
    662
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2011
    Location:
    London
    Two quick questions:

    1) Do you guys treat the bottoms of your leather-soled shoes? Or will they be fine as they come. I've done this with Reno for my shoes once in a while but am not certain it provides much, if any, benefit.

    2) Where does one acquire shoe sleeves (or bags?). You know, like the ones that AEs come with. I don't want the new suede shoes collecting dust on the rack and, apparently, Grenson doesn't supply any.
     
  2. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,397
    Likes Received:
    8,779
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    

    I treat the bottoms with lexol, or obaneaufs leather oil once in a while to keep them from cracking. If I am out in wet conditions after a couple of days with the shoes on their side to dry out properly I make sure I re-condition the soles. Shoes that I have set aside just for the rain I have had soles dry out and actually crack so conditioning helps avoid this.
     
  3. Pieceofsand

    Pieceofsand Senior member

    Messages:
    1,098
    Likes Received:
    237
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2010
    I have a pair of cordovan vintage Dexter wingtip, the cobbler ended up resoling the whole thing for me for free. Long story short, after a few wears, I noticed that part of the leather has "cracked," I can get some pictures tonight.

    But is something like this generally fixable?
     
  4. nickwjd

    nickwjd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012

    I've treated my leather soled shoes with a generous application of mink oil. Give that a few days to fully dry, then I spitshine it with some neutral paste wax.

    This seems to work fine for water proofness, but in the future, I think I'm going to topy any new leather soled shoes I buy.

    And a shot after my last polishing session:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2012
  5. Lear

    Lear Senior member

    Messages:
    681
    Likes Received:
    60
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2007
    Thanks for the tip PAScheel. I'll consider this next time. Now have to convince the woman on the make-up counter that I want cotton pads to polish my shoes; that I'm not a transvestite cleansing the facial pores.

    Lear
     
  6. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

    Messages:
    12,299
    Likes Received:
    201
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gmunden, Salzkammergut, Austria
    

    why, you're already on the right track.
     
  7. nickwjd

    nickwjd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012

    Well, although I love the look of a nice leather sole, even more when I've shined it, and the sound it makes when walking is indeed subtly nice... at the moment, I'd rather have the shoe's sole last longer than they would if left bare.

    Thing is in Singapore, most of my daily commute is spent doing lots of walking, both indoors and outdoors. So a topy makes sense. I haven't actually tried it yet, so time will tell if I decide to stick with it.
     
  8. Anden

    Anden Senior member

    Messages:
    1,508
    Likes Received:
    5,476
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2011
    Putting a topy on a shoe is like using an UV-filter "for protection" on a camera lens. It kills the feel.
     
  9. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

    Messages:
    12,299
    Likes Received:
    201
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gmunden, Salzkammergut, Austria
    

    you can get shoes with rubber soles.

    i have found out that the quality of the sole leather and a good fit are the deciding factors for longevity. i have done a topy on a pair of shoes, where the original last was not available and the cobbler couldn't guarantee for the quality of the repair. i do not regret it and i do not have to care due to a decent rotation.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2012
  10. joiji

    joiji Senior member

    Messages:
    1,050
    Likes Received:
    78
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2012
    Sorry if its been asked before, but anyone have any quick repairs for a squeaking shoe? I've recently taken delivery of some leather lined/soled suede shoes and the right squeaks. I'd hate to have to have them resoled to early in their life, so any ideas?
     
  11. PAScheel

    PAScheel Member

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2012
    Here's just a quick before/after photo. This took approximately 1.5 hours. As Lear suggested, use an old pair of shoes to practice.

    You should be aware that mirror shining will block the pores in the leather and prevent the leather from breathing. This can be hot in the summer - that's my experience.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  12. BostonHedonist

    BostonHedonist Senior member

    Messages:
    1,692
    Likes Received:
    662
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2011
    Location:
    London
    Nice shine, PAS. Hey Nick, might I ask what make the shoes to the right in that photo are?
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2012
  13. nickwjd

    nickwjd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    fritzl: I could, but pretty much all the shoes I'm considering for my next purchase have leather soles. :-/ Oh well haha.

    PAScheel: Nice work! May I know what wax you used and roughly how many layers that was? I've so far not tried a neutral wax at the end over the colored wax, but I've heard that helps with the glassy look, am wondering if that's what you used.

    BostonHedonist: Those shoes are some unknown label I got from a local department store. It's labelled "Daytona, Imported By Modit". It was S$39 on clearance, so I went for it anyway.
     
  14. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

    Messages:
    12,299
    Likes Received:
    201
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gmunden, Salzkammergut, Austria
    

    besides your preferred selection, you know the conditions at your spot better than i do. after all, i didn't follow my own advice and had one leather soled pair made after the other. now my rotation is big enough that resoling is not an issue. i've done rubber protection on two pairs for the reason, i didn't have access to the original last.
     
  15. PAScheel

    PAScheel Member

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2012
    First I cleaned the shoe with a brush, then I applied a layer of regular black kiwi shoe polish over the entire shoe and buffed. I then applied approx. 3 "thick" layers to the toe and buffed.
    Then I usually use women's stockings with some cotton wool stuffed inside and then I "grind" the toe. Just to get a really plain layer with polish and to avoid the polish to clump.
    When this is done I use an old t-shirt and I just spit shine until there's no pores showing.
    If you look very closely you'll be able to see the pores, like this
    [​IMG]

    When you've applied this much polish you will only be able to see the scratches you've made with the t-shirt or whatever you're using. Now we want to get rid of these scratches. This is the point where I use small cotton pads with a liiiiiiitle amount of polish and much water. When or if these start to scratch i use a new cotton pad.
    And then again small amounts of polish and lots of water. And then I breathe on it meanwhile. You'll soon see the scratches disappear and a nice shine arises. :)

    I found this picture of some Danish ammo boots with a spit shined toe to (almost) perfection (bad quality unfortunately).

    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by