**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. mymil

    mymil Senior member

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    [​IMG]
     


  2. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I think the whole Turpentine thing on shell is bullshit. Many of us have been using it for years with no problems. If there is any leather that CAN handle turp it would be shell.

    I think Nick Horween just recommends Venetian because it is made by a Chicago company. I personally don't like the stuff.
     


  3. gyasih

    gyasih Senior member

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    Ceasar salad dressing on my Sommervilles, any way to get the stain out before it sets deeply? I am at work, so no access to anything strong. But I am next to a Rite Aide or Duane Reade.
     


  4. Northampton Novice

    Northampton Novice Senior member

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    Sprinkle some baking soda on them and leave as long as possible before brushing off. It should absorb much of the oil based stain.

    When you get home repeat leaving the soda to absorb the stain overnight.

    If you are left with a stain Saphir Omni'nettoyant or Terre de Sommieres from Avel are decent products to cleanse the suede of your Sommervilles.
     


  5. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    Dusting off the suede Alden chukkas with the nice weather this week and I got to wondering if using shoe trees in unlined suede shoes for long periods could cause problems. They've sat unworn with shoe trees in them since the fall. Am I overthinking this? It's hard to capture by camera but the spring pushes fairly hard against the rear section of leather.

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    Last edited: Mar 9, 2012


  6. Northampton Novice

    Northampton Novice Senior member

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  7. gyasih

    gyasih Senior member

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    Thanks, NN.

    Fortunately or unfortunately, it's only on the leather. What to do after the backing soda? I used baby powder, I hope that's ok. I ran out to get something, an figured most sites suggested this or talcum powder.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2012


  8. Northampton Novice

    Northampton Novice Senior member

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    Yep baby powder is fine too. After an hour or so just brush off the powder.

    If the stain is still there you have a few options depending on it's severity and/or prominence

    a) Accept it, over time it will add to the patina of the leather

    b) Attempt to clean it, you could try a little renovateur it might help if the stain has not deeply saturated the leather. Leather cleaners like Renomat might help too. Cleansing with turpentine is the most likely to work, but carries the inherent risk of taking finish off too - so you'll have to build that up with creams which can be a bit of a pain.

    c) Take it to a Cobbler


    That's my two cents worth, good luck.
     


  9. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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  10. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I didn't read the link, but I would use lexol on the inside of the uppers now and again. I do that with all of my shoes to prevent cracking from the inside out.
     


  11. kwhunter

    kwhunter Senior member

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    You can strip the finish with TURPENTINE; dampen a cloth and rub gently and the old finish is gone. Let dry and start anew.

     


  12. kwhunter

    kwhunter Senior member

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    You can strip the old finish with a rad=g dampened with TURPENTINE, let dry and redo
     


  13. kwhunter

    kwhunter Senior member

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    You can strip with turpentine, abd redo
     


  14. pnin22

    pnin22 Senior member

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    Folks, I'm trying to mirror-shine the toe-caps of my shoes but not having much success. I'm generally following the procedure outlined in this post. Prepare: lexol conditioner, meltonian brown cream. Shine toe-caps: Kiwi neutral wax, applied with old stocking, slightly moistened.

    The problem is, as I rub the wax in circular motions, after a minute the wax hardens and looks powdery and scruffy. I guess I expect the surface to instead become smoother, but it doesn't. I can brush it and/or buff it with cloth, and it does shine, but nowhere near the mirror finish in the photos posted in this thread. If I look closely, the leather still has a perceivable grain, even after ~15 applications of Kiwi neutral wax. Am I doing something wrong? Should I continue doing this more and more? :dozingoff:
     


  15. NPHAF

    NPHAF Well-Known Member

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    You will never achive a mirror-shine if you use a brush to buff up the shine.
    What you want to do is apply a thin thin layer of cream with a piece of cotton or a rag (an old t-shirt will do) on the toe-area, work with the cream in those circular motions for about five minutes, apply ONE small drop of water on the toe-cap and keep working the cream for ~5-10 minutes. Add another thin thin layer of cream (or polish) and repeat the process until you achive a successful result.

    Note: You do not want to over-applicate the shoe with the cream/polish, very little will do. Same goes with water.
    Here is a youtube clip of the process:
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2012


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