• Hi, I am the owner and main administrator of Styleforum. If you find the forum useful and fun, please help support it by buying through the posted links on the forum. Our main, very popular sales thread, where the latest and best sales are listed, are posted HERE

    Purchases made through some of our links earns a commission for the forum and allows us to do the work of maintaining and improving it. Finally, thanks for being a part of this community. We realize that there are many choices today on the internet, and we have all of you to thank for making Styleforum the foremost destination for discussions of menswear.
  • This site contains affiliate links for which Styleforum may be compensated.
  • Epaulet x Styleforum Alpine Loden Collection

    Loden wool, woven in Tirol for centuries, is known for its resistance to cold and wetness. Our project in collaboration with Epaulet introduces Alpine Loden, a modern 18oz fabric blend of 75% merino wool and 25% nylon, woven in Italy. It's lighter, more durable, wind-resistant, and more comfortable than traditional Loden fabric. Partnering with Rochester Tailored Clothing, we offer custom garments like sportcoats, suits, and overcoats, made to your specifications. Learn more about the Loden collection here.

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

    Styleforum is supported in part by commission earning affiliate links sitewide. Please support us by using them. You may learn more here.

noretailplease

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2019
Messages
723
Reaction score
1,329
two of my all time rrl favorites -- which they don't make 'em like any more...
r2.png
r1.png
 

notthemanager

Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2022
Messages
14
Reaction score
1
I recently received my Indigo Chambray Workshirt. tagged L, but fits much smaller than my Checked Indigo Cotton-Linen Workshirt, more like an M. while measurements are slightly larger than M, not really all that close to L. Do these generally fit small? I prefer things oversized to just-right or fitted, but I don’t know if I’ve worn an XL in anything in my life. not sure what to do
 

heebalabala

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
526
Reaction score
3,522
I recently received my Indigo Chambray Workshirt. tagged L, but fits much smaller than my Checked Indigo Cotton-Linen Workshirt, more like an M. while measurements are slightly larger than M, not really all that close to L. Do these generally fit small? I prefer things oversized to just-right or fitted, but I don’t know if I’ve worn an XL in anything in my life. not sure what to do
If it's this one, I have it as well and it's a trim fit. I wouldn't say it's a full size smaller but it's on the slimmer side.

 

heebalabala

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
526
Reaction score
3,522
@kurdo's belt questions have been well-answered but, since he raised the topic, I'll share my thoughts for general reference having collected way too many vintage belts and dealt with length considerations.


Discard any preconceptions about “correct" belt lengths. If you don’t want to take my word for it, look to Uncle Ralph as your guiding star. His belt lengths range anywhere from a short stub past the buckle to dangling at the hip. Some are long enough that he does the Brunello Cucinelli wrap-around (within reason). Uncle Ralph doesn’t care; nor should you. If a belt is awesome, embrace its awesomeness and wear it whether it’s a stub or a dangler.

If you must adjust the length, inspect the tip end first to see if the design, such as the tooling or edge stitching, rules out shortening from the tip end. The next consideration is appearance. If vintage, is there enough good patina on the tip end that its best to preserve it, or is it thrashed enough that shortening would be a net gain? Don’t worry about the punch holes. I have belts where the punch holes go all the way to the tip after shortening and it looks great. New punch holes after shortening are also very easy to add.

If there are downsides to shortening from the tip end, shorten the buckle end. The disadvantage is you’ll need a lot more leather length to create a new buckle fold-over and hardware. For vintage belts, it’s usually a net gain to scrap the existing hardware, which are usually oxidized, poorly functioning snaps. I don’t recommend riveting a buckle to the strap so you can’t swap out the buckle. I also think Chicago screws are a pain because I swap out buckles all the time. If you swap out buckles infrequently, consider Chicago screws. Otherwise go with snaps. Beware with vintage belts that if the leather isn’t in great condition, creating a new buckle fold-over can crack the leather around the loop. Ask your leather guy/gal’s opinion on the leather condition before proceeding.

Whichever shortening modification you use, have your leather guy/gal check to see if there’s enough leather to make a new keeper. Even if the belt already has a keeper, a spare is always handy. On vintage belts, it’s especially advantageous because your next vintage belt may be missing its keeper. I sometimes move keepers between my belts because there are a few that I really like due to their patina or color shade. Don’t let a keeper not exactly matching a belt stop you from swapping it to another belt.

Ralph-belt-1.jpg

Ralph-belt-2.jpg

Ralph-belt-3.jpg

Ralph-belt-4.jpg

Ralph-belt-5.jpg
 

notthemanager

Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2022
Messages
14
Reaction score
1
If it's this one, I have it as well and it's a trim fit. I wouldn't say it's a full size smaller but it's on the slimmer side.

Sorry, I didn’t realize there are two. It’s this one, but the design/construction seems almost identical, so fit may be. I think I’ll size up…
 

WaltDud

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2023
Messages
150
Reaction score
240
@kurdo's belt questions have been well-answered but, since he raised the topic, I'll share my thoughts for general reference having collected way too many vintage belts and dealt with length considerations.


Discard any preconceptions about “correct" belt lengths. If you don’t want to take my word for it, look to Uncle Ralph as your guiding star. His belt lengths range anywhere from a short stub past the buckle to dangling at the hip. Some are long enough that he does the Brunello Cucinelli wrap-around (within reason). Uncle Ralph doesn’t care; nor should you. If a belt is awesome, embrace its awesomeness and wear it whether it’s a stub or a dangler.

If you must adjust the length, inspect the tip end first to see if the design, such as the tooling or edge stitching, rules out shortening from the tip end. The next consideration is appearance. If vintage, is there enough good patina on the tip end that its best to preserve it, or is it thrashed enough that shortening would be a net gain? Don’t worry about the punch holes. I have belts where the punch holes go all the way to the tip after shortening and it looks great. New punch holes after shortening are also very easy to add.

If there are downsides to shortening from the tip end, shorten the buckle end. The disadvantage is you’ll need a lot more leather length to create a new buckle fold-over and hardware. For vintage belts, it’s usually a net gain to scrap the existing hardware, which are usually oxidized, poorly functioning snaps. I don’t recommend riveting a buckle to the strap so you can’t swap out the buckle. I also think Chicago screws are a pain because I swap out buckles all the time. If you swap out buckles infrequently, consider Chicago screws. Otherwise go with snaps. Beware with vintage belts that if the leather isn’t in great condition, creating a new buckle fold-over can crack the leather around the loop. Ask your leather guy/gal’s opinion on the leather condition before proceeding.

Whichever shortening modification you use, have your leather guy/gal check to see if there’s enough leather to make a new keeper. Even if the belt already has a keeper, a spare is always handy. On vintage belts, it’s especially advantageous because your next vintage belt may be missing its keeper. I sometimes move keepers between my belts because there are a few that I really like due to their patina or color shade. Don’t let a keeper not exactly matching a belt stop you from swapping it to another belt.

View attachment 2201735
View attachment 2201737
View attachment 2201739
View attachment 2201741
View attachment 2201743
This was a fantastic write-up. Reminds me of dieworkwear saying Ralph is above the law lol dude can get away with anything:
 

Attachments

  • IMG_4796.jpeg
    IMG_4796.jpeg
    197.1 KB · Views: 51

tweedlover

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2021
Messages
449
Reaction score
355
@kurdo's belt questions have been well-answered but, since he raised the topic, I'll share my thoughts for general reference having collected way too many vintage belts and dealt with length considerations.


Discard any preconceptions about “correct" belt lengths. If you don’t want to take my word for it, look to Uncle Ralph as your guiding star. His belt lengths range anywhere from a short stub past the buckle to dangling at the hip. Some are long enough that he does the Brunello Cucinelli wrap-around (within reason). Uncle Ralph doesn’t care; nor should you. If a belt is awesome, embrace its awesomeness and wear it whether it’s a stub or a dangler.

If you must adjust the length, inspect the tip end first to see if the design, such as the tooling or edge stitching, rules out shortening from the tip end. The next consideration is appearance. If vintage, is there enough good patina on the tip end that its best to preserve it, or is it thrashed enough that shortening would be a net gain? Don’t worry about the punch holes. I have belts where the punch holes go all the way to the tip after shortening and it looks great. New punch holes after shortening are also very easy to add.

If there are downsides to shortening from the tip end, shorten the buckle end. The disadvantage is you’ll need a lot more leather length to create a new buckle fold-over and hardware. For vintage belts, it’s usually a net gain to scrap the existing hardware, which are usually oxidized, poorly functioning snaps. I don’t recommend riveting a buckle to the strap so you can’t swap out the buckle. I also think Chicago screws are a pain because I swap out buckles all the time. If you swap out buckles infrequently, consider Chicago screws. Otherwise go with snaps. Beware with vintage belts that if the leather isn’t in great condition, creating a new buckle fold-over can crack the leather around the loop. Ask your leather guy/gal’s opinion on the leather condition before proceeding.

Whichever shortening modification you use, have your leather guy/gal check to see if there’s enough leather to make a new keeper. Even if the belt already has a keeper, a spare is always handy. On vintage belts, it’s especially advantageous because your next vintage belt may be missing its keeper. I sometimes move keepers between my belts because there are a few that I really like due to their patina or color shade. Don’t let a keeper not exactly matching a belt stop you from swapping it to another belt.

View attachment 2201735
View attachment 2201737
View attachment 2201739
View attachment 2201741
View attachment 2201743
Belt over the jacket look does not look good to me
 

kurdo

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2022
Messages
384
Reaction score
322
@kurdo's belt questions have been well-answered but, since he raised the topic, I'll share my thoughts for general reference having collected way too many vintage belts and dealt with length considerations.


Discard any preconceptions about “correct" belt lengths. If you don’t want to take my word for it, look to Uncle Ralph as your guiding star. His belt lengths range anywhere from a short stub past the buckle to dangling at the hip. Some are long enough that he does the Brunello Cucinelli wrap-around (within reason). Uncle Ralph doesn’t care; nor should you. If a belt is awesome, embrace its awesomeness and wear it whether it’s a stub or a dangler.

If you must adjust the length, inspect the tip end first to see if the design, such as the tooling or edge stitching, rules out shortening from the tip end. The next consideration is appearance. If vintage, is there enough good patina on the tip end that its best to preserve it, or is it thrashed enough that shortening would be a net gain? Don’t worry about the punch holes. I have belts where the punch holes go all the way to the tip after shortening and it looks great. New punch holes after shortening are also very easy to add.

If there are downsides to shortening from the tip end, shorten the buckle end. The disadvantage is you’ll need a lot more leather length to create a new buckle fold-over and hardware. For vintage belts, it’s usually a net gain to scrap the existing hardware, which are usually oxidized, poorly functioning snaps. I don’t recommend riveting a buckle to the strap so you can’t swap out the buckle. I also think Chicago screws are a pain because I swap out buckles all the time. If you swap out buckles infrequently, consider Chicago screws. Otherwise go with snaps. Beware with vintage belts that if the leather isn’t in great condition, creating a new buckle fold-over can crack the leather around the loop. Ask your leather guy/gal’s opinion on the leather condition before proceeding.

Whichever shortening modification you use, have your leather guy/gal check to see if there’s enough leather to make a new keeper. Even if the belt already has a keeper, a spare is always handy. On vintage belts, it’s especially advantageous because your next vintage belt may be missing its keeper. I sometimes move keepers between my belts because there are a few that I really like due to their patina or color shade. Don’t let a keeper not exactly matching a belt stop you from swapping it to another belt.

View attachment 2201735
View attachment 2201737
View attachment 2201739
View attachment 2201741
View attachment 2201743
Amazing write-up, thank you! Bookmarked your post for future reference :)

I may now leave the belt as is ... some of those styles aren't too bad!
 

Vinnievh92

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2023
Messages
127
Reaction score
171
156A2956.jpg

Talking about pieces I'd love to see return. This one in medium. Frans Boone's sale confronted me with missing out again. Incredibly beautiful. Would have bought it full price right away. If anyone knows where to get a medium or wants to part with his medium, let me know.

I've seen Gnatty post a blue jacket with orange stripes if I remember correctly. I really want a couple of those kind of blazers (sports jackets?) in my collection.
 
Last edited:

clee1982

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
29,219
Reaction score
25,076
Also a beauty. In these years, the M-series were still a sleeper. The current cars scream performance and aggression, which is less my taste.

Good for you, you've have/had some awesome cars.

The big grill M4 looks very aggressive actually, I thought I would hate it. The new M2 literally looks like a real life hot wheel, semi comical wide stance
 

Featured Sponsor

Invisible Socks: Convenience or Curse?

  • Convenience

  • Curse


Results are only viewable after voting.

Forum statistics

Threads
511,658
Messages
10,633,884
Members
225,718
Latest member
katywest335
Top