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The Official Dieworkwear Appreciation Thread

zissou

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I mostly use my Juki DDL8700 with a knee lift that gives enough clearance. Some of the seams on on that anorak were almost 1/2” thick! I have a few home machines- an old Pfaff that is a cylinder bed (good for cuffs and hems), an old Pfaff serger, and a Juki cover stitch machine. I recently acquired a Reece S2 buttonhole machine from the 1930s that saved my life on this project. It’s a work of art and absolute tank.
FB3CE6F2-15E1-4F46-BA0B-FB33FC1DAB99.jpeg
 
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ericgereghty

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I have this one:

How do you typically pair it? Love the look of the cloth. I'd have to gamble on sizing up (though I have an inkling it's likely a small one) if I were to get it.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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How do you typically pair it? Love the look of the cloth. I'd have to gamble on sizing up (though I have an inkling it's likely a small one) if I were to get it.
I wear it with a charcoal long-sleeve polo from Proper Cloth and black tassel loafers. Or with a white shirt and black knit tie and black tassel loafers.
 

DoubleDouble

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I might have the opposite problem as some people here: my fear is buying really good things and not using them enough. If you spend a lot of money on something, you better use it or it's wasted! I remember reading Simon Crompton saying that he doesn't wear his RMC sweatshirt to the park with kids and being baffled. There are of course caveats for the "finer" things (which the RMC sweatshirt isn't, despite the price), some items need a lot of care because they are delicate, but even then you're better off caring for them than not wearing them.

Ironically my main problem with wearing long coats in my suburb is that it never really gets cold enough (SF Bay Area). Even now with the temperature at ~50–55f (10–13c) there's people in shorts and sandals. It stands out not because of formality necessarily (which I wouldn't care about) but because it looks like you really want to wear a coat despite the weather not being right for it.
 

justsayno

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If you feel cold, wear the coat. Who cares what joe down the block wears.
 

sood

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I might have the opposite problem as some people here: my fear is buying really good things and not using them enough. If you spend a lot of money on something, you better use it or it's wasted! I remember reading Simon Crompton saying that he doesn't wear his RMC sweatshirt to the park with kids and being baffled. There are of course caveats for the "finer" things (which the RMC sweatshirt isn't, despite the price), some items need a lot of care because they are delicate, but even then you're better off caring for them than not wearing them.

Ironically my main problem with wearing long coats in my suburb is that it never really gets cold enough (SF Bay Area). Even now with the temperature at ~50–55f (10–13c) there's people in shorts and sandals. It stands out not because of formality necessarily (which I wouldn't care about) but because it looks like you really want to wear a coat despite the weather not being right for it.
haha ditto, I wear my RMC sweats & IH Flannels everywhere and some clothes look better beaten up and this squarely falls in that category.
 

SimModa

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Mr. Six

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This may a be a weird question but I figured this may be the best place to ask, how do you all who live in the depths of suburbia wear longer coats like balmacaans? Even though I'm working downtown, my daily commute is from my garage to another garage. I never really step outside. It just seems like my bal although awesome, is a bit much to drive the 25 minutes into the city and then immediately take it off when I get into the office.

I thought to wear it to the park with the kids, but then I'm sticking out like a sore thumb in the middle of a sea of dads in Patagonia down sweaters... I guess I need to learn to care a little less.
A Second Wave — Die, Workwear!
 

krudsma

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I mostly use my Juki DDL8700 with a knee lift that gives enough clearance. Some of the seams on on that anorak were almost 1/2” thick! I have a few home machines- an old Pfaff that is a cylinder bed (good for cuffs and hems), an old Pfaff serger, and a Juki cover stitch machine. I recently acquired a Reece S2 buttonhole machine from the 1930s that saved my life on this project. It’s a work of art and absolute tank.
What's the learning curve like working with a vintage machine? I've often thought about getting one but I'm daunted by the thought of setting it up and maintaining it. I have a computerized Brother that works well enough but it feels pretty flimsy especially on thicker seams.
 

Numbernine

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I have a Singer 15-91. A bit limited but it works for the mostly personal alterations I do and it will sew almost anything you can force under the foot.
 

d4nimal

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What's the learning curve like working with a vintage machine? I've often thought about getting one but I'm daunted by the thought of setting it up and maintaining it. I have a computerized Brother that works well enough but it feels pretty flimsy especially on thicker seams.
I’m sure @zissou can give you a more experienced answer but I’ve owned two vintage Pfaff and a Necchi Mira. Most of them had some minor issues and hadn’t been used in years that required some heat and oil but otherwise were pretty easy to set up. One of mine was in a cabinet and the other two were just alone. I took a sewing class on a modern Juki and the difference in power and speed though was pretty pronounced. Maybe I don’t have my machines humming at optimal condition either but they kinda vibrate more than the modern Jukis I sewed on. On thicker seams I have issues with all of them except the Juki having enough clearance under the foot.
 

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