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The Official Dieworkwear Appreciation Thread

imatlas

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That's for leftovers.
I keep a sliced loaf in the freezer at all times so it's always on hand for breakfast. I rarely eat it any other way, and for religious purposes maybe twice a decade?
 

FlyingHorker

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From the company itself. Major, the father, passed away a couple of years ago but he explained the piece work process and working with independent native knitters on Vancouver island. Most of their designs are indeed cowichan-inspired : they collaborate with a lot of brands to design sweaters that are nothing like traditional cowichans (which have animal, patterns and knots that have specific meanings or are associated with specific families). Kanata has used the native knitters to make “fashion” versions for 30 or 40 years. Some have motorcycles on them - ours has a Japanese-inspired sweeping crane on it. These are not true cowichans in the traditional sense (and I think the tribes have a specific set of design requirements and processes that are needed to get the “genuine cowichan” appellation). One of them is that each piece is made by one knitted from start to finish and I remember Major saying that they do not work like that: they have knitters make panels that are then linked.

It’s also possible to buy custom pieces directly from the knitters - what the Manders did was create a somewhat modern process to continue to employ native knitters as part of a more efficient wholesale business.

that’s all I know.
Dope, thanks for the info Greg. This does clear up a lot of my questions and has me leaning towards trying out Kanata in the future.
 

FlyingHorker

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My take on this is the same as ever. I call it the "just a test".

I am Jewish. A bagel is a Jewish food. However, a bagel is just a piece of food. There isn't really any deeper significance to it, though it has its own history and it may evoke certain emotions for some people. I enoy a bagel as a piece of food. I have no problem if others do as well (though a part of me will always cringe if I see someone put bacon on one).

Challah is not just a piece of food. It has religious significance. When people eat it as just food, they are stripping it of its significance. Literally, they are appropriating it to their own wants and needs. They are taking something that has a particular meaning and specialness to certain people and ignoring all that, treating it as just another food, only appreciating it as an aesthetic object. (Nonetheless, I don't get offended because I don't think people know better.)

I think the same goes for a lot of clothing. A lot of clothing from various cultures is just clothing. If you wear it, that means you appreciate it as a piece of clothing in much the same way that the people of the culture from which the garment originates appreciate it. You may appreciate it less, but I think you are mostly appreciating it in the same way.

A lot of clothing, however, has particular meanings. If you just wear such pieces of clothing just as clothing, you are only appreciating the aesthetic element and are ignoring all these other meanings. People should try not to do this.
Yup, we're on the same page. To me, a turban holds particular cultural and religious meanings, a bleeding madras shirt does not.

I do wish I knew more on the meaning, or lack of meaning regarding clothing like "Southwest" cardigans and clothing from actual Native people. Otherwise I'm just going off of hearsay and assumptions.
 

krudsma

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How'd you guys size for the Frizmworks parka btw? I've been looking at it for a few years now, which means that maybe it's time. I also love the look of the original Eddie Bauer and the Nigel pieces, but don't want to get into those for the reasons you both listed.

Bummed I passed on the orange parka last year - that color is stellar.

*Edit - I'm also in the tall/skinny club. Just send me the slack invite.
I went with a medium, I think I might have gotten the last one in that color. I do love the shoelace looking drawstring on the Nigel version but I'm very happy with this one overall.



(not necessarily what I would wear it with, but had to do a fit-check)
 

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Gus

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The ranch cardigans are indeed unique. I wouldn't wear them, though, since they've just appropriated Native American designs for expensive made in China cardigans. I'd wear a Pendleton or authentic Chimayo coat since they actually support Native American artists and education programs. Even then, as a white boy, I probably wouldn't. Kanata cowichans are outstanding.
Chimayo is a small village just north of where I live. The early Spanish conquistador Coronado (or settler depending upon who you are talking too) came through with 5000 sheep around 1540 to the area. The sheep were for their wool and not food. This began the local weaving in a Rio Grande style blanket. Where did the style come from? The Spanish, mixed with indiginous Mexican. The settlers who remained in the area were mostly men and soon intermarried with women from the local pueblos. So are you Native American or Spanish? To this day, the majority of well known Chimayo weavers that I run into all have Spanish surnames.

As far as Navajo designed blankets. Their earliest blankets (Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3) were basically simple stripes and a few diamonds were added later. These were kept for their own use. Once the railroad opened in the 1880's the Southwest to regular visitors, the trading posts would give photos of Persian rugs to weavers and ask them to use some of the designs to appeal to tourists to take back to the Mid-west and East Coast. This isn't to say that all Navajo rugs copied Persian rugs literally but many adopted elements to appeal to a wider audience. And, of course, there are shared simple graphic symbols that you find in remote, ancient cultures around the world that also appear in Native American weavings, pottery and jewelry.

I've only had Anglos from major urban areas lecture me on appropriated design. I know Navajo, Hopi and Zuni artisans and what they care about is when something is represented as "Native made" or named after one of their tribes or pueblos as if it originated there. That, I agree, would not only be wrong, but is against the law. Fortunately, that law is enforced. A local retailer was led away in handcuffs by the FBI for selling turquoise jewelry as "Native Made" when it wasn't, and was in violation of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act https://www.doi.gov/iacb/act
 

d4nimal

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I went with a medium, I think I might have gotten the last one in that color. I do love the shoelace looking drawstring on the Nigel version but I'm very happy with this one overall.



(not necessarily what I would wear it with, but had to do a fit-check)
Thanks! Can you give me a reference as to how you normally size/height/weight etc? I'm gearing up for a hunt for one of these, but I think you got the best version. I miss the corduroy lining that's missing on the newer versions and the lack of colors for current season. I guess the orange didn't sell as quickly as the more under-the-radar ones, which is bananas.
 

krudsma

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Thanks! Can you give me a reference as to how you normally size/height/weight etc? I'm gearing up for a hunt for one of these, but I think you got the best version. I miss the corduroy lining that's missing on the newer versions and the lack of colors for current season. I guess the orange didn't sell as quickly as the more under-the-radar ones, which is bananas.
I'm 6'3" and about 150lb, I usually wear a non-existent 36L in tailoring, 31x34 jeans. The chest measurement on this seems really big but I think that's just because of how bulky it is. A large probably would have worked for me as well.

Edit: @d4nimal fwiw I also considered this model from Labour Union. I haven't heard anything about this brand but the designs seem cool and RRL esque. The pictures of the coat on the model seemed a little slim-fit though.
 

zissou

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How'd you guys size for the Frizmworks parka btw? I've been looking at it for a few years now, which means that maybe it's time. I also love the look of the original Eddie Bauer and the Nigel pieces, but don't want to get into those for the reasons you both listed.

Bummed I passed on the orange parka last year - that color is stellar.

*Edit - I'm also in the tall/skinny club. Just send me the slack invite.
I also have a medium, and it fits me longer in the sleeves and body than krudsma. I’m 6’2”, with an upper body of someone who is 5’11” and legs that are 6’6”.

Still, the Cabourn parka is pretty awesome.

View attachment 1707383

(full disclosure, I might be a bit biased since I have one)
I love Cabourn outerwear, but I won’t pay 10x as much for that parka. I also won’t wear fur (except shearling).
Chimayo is a small village just north of where I live. The early Spanish conquistador Coronado (or settler depending upon who you are talking too) came through with 5000 sheep around 1540 to the area. The sheep were for their wool and not food. This began the local weaving in a Rio Grande style blanket. Where did the style come from? The Spanish, mixed with indiginous Mexican. The settlers who remained in the area were mostly men and soon intermarried with women from the local pueblos. So are you Native American or Spanish? To this day, the majority of well known Chimayo weavers that I run into all have Spanish surnames.

As far as Navajo designed blankets. Their earliest blankets (Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3) were basically simple stripes and a few diamonds were added later. These were kept for their own use. Once the railroad opened in the 1880's the Southwest to regular visitors, the trading posts would give photos of Persian rugs to weavers and ask them to use some of the designs to appeal to tourists to take back to the Mid-west and East Coast. This isn't to say that all Navajo rugs copied Persian rugs literally but many adopted elements to appeal to a wider audience. And, of course, there are shared simple graphic symbols that you find in remote, ancient cultures around the world that also appear in Native American weavings, pottery and jewelry.

I've only had Anglos from major urban areas lecture me on appropriated design. I know Navajo, Hopi and Zuni artisans and what they care about is when something is represented as "Native made" or named after one of their tribes or pueblos as if it originated there. That, I agree, would not only be wrong, but is against the law. Fortunately, that law is enforced. A local retailer was led away in handcuffs by the FBI for selling turquoise jewelry as "Native Made" when it wasn't, and was in violation of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act https://www.doi.gov/iacb/act
Thanks for the info. I’d love to spend more time in the area. I work with members of the Navajo Nation and the Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation, and I just go by what they express to me about appropriation of the symbols that they hold sacred. There’s so much more to the meaning of specific, detailed symbols in Navajo blankets. Requests from traders did influence designs, but really, there are so many sacred meanings to the shapes and symbols.
 

Psyko

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Good to know the Friszmworks Kara Koram is good quality. I've also been eyeing it for a year, but wanted to hear if it was good quality or not.

Sadly, most of the Cabourn stuff has been shitty quality the last few years. Mainline still holding up, as well as parts of the authentic range. The Everest parka is still the shit, though.

Anyone here have experience with Frizmworks' balmacaan? It looks cool, though almost a dead knock off of Kaptain Sunshine's Traveler coat.

Screenshot_20211121-173337_Chrome.jpg
 

Salad

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Good to know the Friszmworks Kara Koram is good quality. I've also been eyeing it for a year, but wanted to hear if it was good quality or not.

Sadly, most of the Cabourn stuff has been shitty quality the last few years. Mainline still holding up, as well as parts of the authentic range. The Everest parka is still the shit, though.

Anyone here have experience with Frizmworks' balmacaan? It looks cool, though almost a dead knock off of Kaptain Sunshine's Traveler coat.

View attachment 1707618
I gave them a long look last year but got frustrated with translating, measurements, finding a proxy, etc. so let it pass. They're inexpensive enough to take a chance on, though.
 

Octobab

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Good to know the Friszmworks Kara Koram is good quality. I've also been eyeing it for a year, but wanted to hear if it was good quality or not.

Sadly, most of the Cabourn stuff has been shitty quality the last few years. Mainline still holding up, as well as parts of the authentic range. The Everest parka is still the shit, though.

Anyone here have experience with Frizmworks' balmacaan? It looks cool, though almost a dead knock off of Kaptain Sunshine's Traveler coat.
Very seriously eyeing this myself. Price aside, I strongly prefer the pocket designs, it's fully lined, wool seems to be heavier (this year's lightweight KS offerings seem great for the SanFran crowd, but I'm gonna be walking to work this winter...), and the brown color in particular is very nice, and iirc it was only done by KS the one time for Namu shop
 

hamish5178

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another data point: I am 6' 165# and have a large (orange) Frizmworks parka via AllBluesCo.

It is definitely slouchy/oversized on me, a medium would have worked, but with less room for layering.

I wanted something I could wear over a suit on absolutely miserable NYC days and not even need to think about what was under it. Any remotely nice day I wear a topcoat or balmacaan, so a "fitted" parka makes no sense to me . . .
 

d4nimal

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another data point: I am 6' 165# and have a large (orange) Frizmworks parka via AllBluesCo.

It is definitely slouchy/oversized on me, a medium would have worked, but with less room for layering.

I wanted something I could wear over a suit on absolutely miserable NYC days and not even need to think about what was under it. Any remotely nice day I wear a topcoat or balmacaan, so a "fitted" parka makes no sense to me . . .
This is all super helpful thank you!
 

JayDotz

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For those that have the frizmworks….curious if the fabric is water resistant at all? How does it handle rain/snow.
 

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