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The Official Dieworkwear Appreciation Thread

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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I try to tell younguns nowadays about the Golden Age of Tumblr, when people would freely reblog each other and Tumblr Editors would tag your post #menswear if they liked it, which is where the term hashtag menswear came from. Saw a man wearing a tie the other day and tried to tell him about Fuck Yeah Menswear. He said, "Sir, this is a T-Mobile store."
 

Thin White Duke

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How old is she? Sometimes it takes a while. Green Day is old to today’s kids and has quite a few records so just wading through that and realizing 20 year old music is a small but involving step. Trying to look into all the bands you threw at her at once might seem overwhelming since she is still probably also trying to stay current with today’s music. Not everyone becomes obsessive all at once like me, you and most people here who throw themselves deep into a hobby with abandon but they may explore upwards slowly.
Well that was ten years ago when she was mid twenties. I even played a couple of tracks from ‘In The City’ but she just shrugged and thought it was OK but didn’t show any enthusiasm to investigate further.
I offer all this not as judgement just as observation. Generations younger than me aim their importance at other things. It was ever thus. People my age often talk about how we couldn’t wait for a new single to drop. Listened to Peter Powell’s ‘five 45s at 5.45’ on Radio One in the hope of being the first to hear a new song on the radio. Overjoyed if a band put out an album with a gatefold sleeve and lyrics. Now songs are bought online and lyrics available all over the internet, there’s no value in the experience of owning a new album. Downloads are played on shuffle which destroys the progressive ‘set list’ of the album. Just different times.
Sorry for the digression!
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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Well that was ten years ago when she was mid twenties. I even played a couple of tracks from ‘In The City’ but she just shrugged and thought it was OK but didn’t show any enthusiasm to investigate further.
I offer all this not as judgement just as observation. Generations younger than me aim their importance at other things. It was ever thus. People my age often talk about how we couldn’t wait for a new single to drop. Listened to Peter Powell’s ‘five 45s at 5.45’ on Radio One in the hope of being the first to hear a new song on the radio. Overjoyed if a band put out an album with a gatefold sleeve and lyrics. Now songs are bought online and lyrics available all over the internet, there’s no value in the experience of owning a new album. Downloads are played on shuffle which destroys the progressive ‘set list’ of the album. Just different times.
Sorry for the digression!
My impression is that different people have different relationships with music. When I was growing up, most people also didn't have the inclination or interest to research bands and musicians like this. Like, in the way you described, where you'd follow through a series of inspiration points. I think the only people who did that kind of thing were hardcore music obsessives.

I did the same thing when I was in high school. For a time, I used to buy mixtapes from Japan (well, they were mixed and made in Japan, and then sold at small boutique record shops in the US). Those tapes featured the original tracks that were sampled in various popular songs. So if you heard a song on the radio, it was often cobbled together through a series of samples. Then some DJ, often Japanese, although not always, would make a mixtape of all those original records. That was how I discovered jazz, blues, old R&B, and lots of soul music.

I loved that stuff at the time, and still do. But most people outside of my small group of friends had little interest, even if they thought old records were cool. I also think there was a cultural and social dimension to it. I got into stuff and then was reinforced through my friends, who were also into this stuff. And I found you could gain a bit of cultural capital from knowing about something. Like being able to talk about old records or whatever. If you're not in that social group or don't care about that specific form of social/ cultural capital, you are probably not going to put in the work to find those old records.

I'm sometimes surprised by how easy it is now to find old sources and B-sides. I used to spend so much of my time digging through old records. Now it's in the "suggestions" list on Spotify or YouTube.
 

Thin White Duke

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My impression is that different people have different relationships with music. When I was growing up, most people also didn't have the inclination or interest to research bands and musicians like this. Like, in the way you described, where you'd follow through a series of inspiration points. I think the only people who did that kind of thing were hardcore music obsessives.

I did the same thing when I was in high school. For a time, I used to buy mixtapes from Japan (well, they were mixed and made in Japan, and then sold at small boutique record shops in the US). Those tapes featured the original tracks that were sampled in various popular songs. So if you heard a song on the radio, it was often cobbled together through a series of samples. Then some DJ, often Japanese, although not always, would make a mixtape of all those original records. That was how I discovered jazz, blues, old R&B, and lots of soul music.

I loved that stuff at the time, and still do. But most people outside of my small group of friends had little interest, even if they thought old records were cool. I also think there was a cultural and social dimension to it. I got into stuff and then was reinforced through my friends, who were also into this stuff. And I found you could gain a bit of cultural capital from knowing about something. Like being able to talk about old records or whatever. If you're not in that social group or don't care about that specific form of social/ cultural capital, you are probably not going to put in the work to find those old records.

I'm sometimes surprised by how easy it is now to find old sources and B-sides. I used to spend so much of my time digging through old records. Now it's in the "suggestions" list on Spotify or YouTube.
Yeah that mix tape thing reminds me of my neighbour. He’s a Bozniak immigrant in his late thirties who came here as a kid, grew up in Chicago and spoke no English so says Tupac got him through his teens! He’s heavily into that rap scene and when he plays it I just hear all the samples and want to hear the real thing. California Love makes me want to play Zapp. Biggie makes me want to play Rise. Ice Cube makes me want to play Footsteps in the Dark. The rap songs just play a hook on a loop and I try to tell my mate to go to the source where he’ll hear the whole song with intros, verses, choruses, breaks, solos, bridges, codas etc but he’s not interested!
Eeeh these younguns, they knaa nowt!
 

scurvyfreedman

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Yeah that mix tape thing reminds me of my neighbour. He’s a Bozniak immigrant in his late thirties who came here as a kid, grew up in Chicago and spoke no English so says Tupac got him through his teens! He’s heavily into that rap scene and when he plays it I just hear all the samples and want to hear the real thing. California Love makes me want to play Zapp. Biggie makes me want to play Rise. Ice Cube makes me want to play Footsteps in the Dark. The rap songs just play a hook on a loop and I try to tell my mate to go to the source where he’ll hear the whole song with intros, verses, choruses, breaks, solos, bridges, codas etc but he’s not interested!
Eeeh these younguns, they knaa nowt!
Although I enjoy when a song like Fast Car comes on and I can rap all of Nice and Smooth's Sometimes I Rhyme Slow, my preference is when the samples are not just the full song backing track. I like when it's bits and pieces of different things, but nearly always Funky Drummer and an 808 Kick.

Marley Marl did a video series called Classic Recipes on Youtube: Mama Said Knock You Out, Eric B. is President, there's more in the series. So good explaining how he layered different samples.

I don't think anyone is a match for Preemo, but Marley was his predecessor and inspiration.
 

karmaguy

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somewhat related but the now defunct combat jack podcast has some greatttt interviews with all sorts of great rap/hiphop folks...i def req listening to the first scarface episode (he breaks out a guitar and jams to pink floyd?) and the big daddy kane ep
 

SpooPoker

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I can rap all of Nice and Smooth's Sometimes I Rhyme Slow
man last summer we went to a karaoke bar and I did that with my eyes closed and my back to the screen I got a standing ovation!
 

Ziqianzhu

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Back to the balmacaan discussion, here's another one to throw into the ring - Loro Piana Storm System Cashmere from Cavour https://cavour.co/en/product/2968/raglan-cashmere-belt-coat Strongly considering this one, but I haven't had any experience w/ Storm System and hear it's not very comfortable, also that this will probably be fairly lightweight (albeit fine for Texas). Not sure it goes as well w/ casual looks either.

You can also MTM a long raglan car coat from Kent Wang, with options for a belted back, inverted pleat, etc. I might go in this direction because of the price and flexibility ($as low as the mid 700s w/ a full canvas!).
I am also interested in the Cavour raglan coat. Checked the Kent Wang options. The most of fabrics are light too and cashmere ones went up to $1000. Not sure if the options can make one similar to Kaptain Sunshine Traveller coat, I will not hesitate to pull the trigger if it does.
 

thatboyo

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at 1k, why not just spend a bit more and get the real thing?
 

scurvyfreedman

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Although I enjoy when a song like Fast Car comes on and I can rap all of Nice and Smooth's Sometimes I Rhyme Slow, my preference is when the samples are not just the full song backing track. I like when it's bits and pieces of different things, but nearly always Funky Drummer and an 808 Kick.

Marley Marl did a video series called Classic Recipes on Youtube: Mama Said Knock You Out, Eric B. is President, there's more in the series. So good explaining how he layered different samples.
Come on guys, Hiphop Junkies is waaaaayyyyyy better than Sometimes I Rhyme Slow
One guy I worked with was talking about how he thought a woman he was dating was using coke. I dropped, "whoa little hottie, I'm not DeLorean, Gambino, or Gatti, I don't deal coke, and furthermore you're making me broke, I'll put you into rehab and I won't tell your folks."

At least he didn't say she was fat. Otherwise, I would have had to drop, "Greg Nice, my life's like a fairytale, Orca was a great big whale, I new a fat girl who broke the scale, you won't tell, I won't tell."
 

SpooPoker

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I try to tell younguns nowadays about the Golden Age of Tumblr, when people would freely reblog each other and Tumblr Editors would tag your post #menswear if they liked it, which is where the term hashtag menswear came from. Saw a man wearing a tie the other day and tried to tell him about Fuck Yeah Menswear. He said, "Sir, this is a T-Mobile store."
first time I got that blue tag was feeling myself for sure, cant lie
 

FlyingHorker

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Well that was ten years ago when she was mid twenties. I even played a couple of tracks from ‘In The City’ but she just shrugged and thought it was OK but didn’t show any enthusiasm to investigate further.
I offer all this not as judgement just as observation. Generations younger than me aim their importance at other things. It was ever thus. People my age often talk about how we couldn’t wait for a new single to drop. Listened to Peter Powell’s ‘five 45s at 5.45’ on Radio One in the hope of being the first to hear a new song on the radio. Overjoyed if a band put out an album with a gatefold sleeve and lyrics. Now songs are bought online and lyrics available all over the internet, there’s no value in the experience of owning a new album. Downloads are played on shuffle which destroys the progressive ‘set list’ of the album. Just different times.
Sorry for the digression!
Interesting. I used to do that obsessive digging through rap album samples and going backwards to find older music and other genres.

I stopped doing that in my early 20's, which wasn't that long ago, and the search just no longer interests me. Feels like a waste of time these days.
 

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