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The official CELINE thread

thorns

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Leather jacket too slim for this silhouette. The jacket also needs to be oversized for visual balance.
 

kieran84

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Those womenswear editorials look great. Can't see how this doesn't sell really well.

Jabba very interesting posts, and I definitely see your point with Dior Homme. Would you view Black Tie and Parade as falling into the same category? Both seem quite commercial to me (but perfectly done), which for me is actually a good thing. I just want to smell attractive.

I don't remember that Higher advertisement. That picture was part of the menswear campaign, strange that they wouldn't bother to shoot a separate one. Are you sure that's not a Photoshop?
 

Lit Harington

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chinese customer getting a hands-on with a bunch of TKP pieces already (in his instagram stories)
 

thorns

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The original Bois d' Argent was my absolute favorite in the 2000's I used to get the big bottles.
Annick Menardo really did a good job with Bois d'Argent.

Her thoughts on Bois d'Argent:
Hedi Slimane, the artistic director of Dior Homme, had commissioned three colognes for three masculine personas, and listed materials he loved, such as incense, liquorice, lavender… then he let us do our jobs. He’s a creator. He trusted the perfumers. I guess he’d asked for me because he’d smelled Lolita, but I’d already worked on the liquorice-lavender accord in the masculine Lolita. Francis Kurkdjian ended up doing the liquorice in Eau Noire. I only sent one submission, for what became Bois d’argent, adding vanilla to the incense he’d asked for. As it was meant to be for a dandy, I’d called it Alfred, after the poet Alfred de Musset.
I feel like he gave the perfumers more freedom for those 3 colognes at Dior. There are pros and cons. The pros is that the perfumers had more leeway which resulted in beautiful creations without a lot of constraints. The cons is that it doesn't necessarily reflect on sales/wearability. Eau Noire, Black Tie's older brother, is very polarizing and loud. It is a fragrance that will appeal to fragrance snobs. A lot of reviews complain about the "curry" smell that comes from the immortelle flower. I'm thankful that I didn't grow up around authentic curry, so I don't have that strong of an association. The same can't be said for my play-doh association with Dans Paris, however. Learning from his experience at Dior, and gaining more fragrance experience, Hedi had more input for the Celine fragrances for sure. He took Eau Noire and refined it a lot more when creatively directing Black Tie. By streamlining it, he made it a lot more wearable which I think better reflects on his vision for fragrances.

Would you view Black Tie and Parade as falling into the same category? Both seem quite commercial to me (but perfectly done), which for me is actually a good thing. I just want to smell attractive.
I would view Black Tie, Parade, and the rest of the collection falling into the same category. There is a very singular vision for each fragrance which isn't as "complex" as mainstream designer releases usually are. The mainstream designers throw a little of everything inside hoping that something will appeal to everyone. The fragrances in the Celine collection is a lot more focused. I can tell that a lot of fragrance snobs would be disappointed because of how subtle and "simple" a lot of the fragrances in the collection is. Many prefer loud, and weird scents, like Eau Noire, that make them ponder. They focus on the scent alone, rather than as a component of the wearer's overall presentation.

I think the fragrances are perfectly executed for their intended purpose. They are also not polarizing, so those who are attracted to this idea of wearing fragrances to complement their outfit will easily find something that appeals to them. The scents alone are quite nice, but when combined with the full package of the clothes it just becomes more than the sum of its parts. I treat it like an accessory, or like background aroma presented with a fancy dish. The aroma by itself might not feel that special, but combined with everything it is just that perfect finishing touch. That little extra detail that elevates it from the mundane.

However, I suspect it won't appeal to the average "niche" crowd. They might like wearing Tom Ford more. "If I'm going to be paying this much, I want it to be dramatic." Personally, I feel like those people don't have good taste.

I feel that both Parade and Black Tie carry a calm composed feeling. Parade gives me an impression of someone who really takes care of themselves while not being overly prissy, and they exude this feeling of being relaxed and unbothered. Black Tie gives me an impression of seriousness that is made approachable with the vanilla. The seriousness matches with a blazer perfectly. I think Black Tie and Parade can be worn day or night. Parade can be worn with a blazer as well, it just gives the look a more relaxed feeling and slightly less uptight than Black Tie.

I don't remember that Higher advertisement. That picture was part of the menswear campaign, strange that they wouldn't bother to shoot a separate one. Are you sure that's not a Photoshop?
Yeah, it was specifically to tie the fragrance with the men's line. However, Hedi had zero creative input on the juice. I still love it though. It fits a category that was missing in my wardrobe.

The new Dior man is ensuring unprecedented visibility for the start of the school year. Hedi Slimane, creative director of Dior Homme, who arrived last summer from Yves Saint-Laurent, is the masterpiece of an unprecedented synergy between the new Higher Dior perfume, which will be released in September and the winter collection of costumes for men. The Couture and Perfumes entities of the house were until now very compartmentalised. "This is the first time that a perfume has to materialize the representation of the Dior Homme brand," confirms Hugues de la Chevasnerie, group leader in perfume marketing. Farenheit and Eau Sauvage are better known by their name than by their attachment to the brand. ”The global launch of Higher will coincide in France with the couture campaign, which is itself a first. The same trio of creators presided over the two communications: Hedi Slimane, photographer Richard Avedon and Stephen Gan, artistic director of the New York agency Visionnaire Publishing. The same model will embody the Dior man: from head to toe for the costumes, naked for the essence. He has already appeared in teasing, in January, in Liberation. Styled in a 1930s style, it appeared from the back, then from the front two days apart. For Higher, it will be in September and October in billboards, press, TV and cinema all over the world: it wants to be both timeless and modern with a black and white photo, a classic way of filming, enhanced by electronic music. of the group Air, which devotes an original composition to the film.
With I.M. Pei's pyramid soaring to a midsummer-night sky and reflective screens creating bold geometry at the Louvre complex, Dior created a new angle on men's fragrance.
Last week's launch of Higher Dior was a streamlined affair where modernity was the byword, from the sleek metallic-silver packaging with squeegee rubber spray pad to the electronic music from the cool French group Air. It was designed to reflect the aesthetic of the menswear designer Hedi Slimane (at right), who arrived at the house after the tangy lemon fragrance was born, but whose design impact and graphic style could still be seen. The aim is to make Higher a best-seller to match the women's fragrance, J'Adore.
"I didn't even know the concept, but I gave them some key ideas," says Slimane, who recommended HS Graphic as hyper-modern designers and proposed Richard Avedon to photograph the ad of bared muscled torso.
As guests strolled the sculpture galleries where classical masterpieces were spotlighted, images by Avedon of the pouty-lipped model Eric Van Nostrand flickered on screen like video art.
Slimane is also working on new Dior menswear store for Milan's Via Montenapoleone.
Parfums Christian Dior, on a roll with the blockbuster women’s scent J’adore, hopes to take the business up another notch in September with a new men’s fragrance, called Higher Dior.
As reported, the image of the fragrance was created with the input of hot men’s designer Hedi Slimane, who joined Dior as artistic director for men’s wear last July.
“It is the first time in the history of Dior that a product is being developed [so closely] with a designer,” said Sabina Belli, international marketing director for fragrance products at Parfums Christian Dior, and director of license development for fragrances and cosmetics at parent company LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton.
Dior is banking on Higher to rise to the international top-10 men’s fragrance roster within three years. The company already has a top-ranked men’s scent — Fahrenheit, which was launched in 1988 and has earned an international following. But its other big men’s seller, Eau Sauvage, is a more regional scent, ringing up sales primarily in Mediterranean countries.
Belli wouldn’t talk numbers for Higher, but industry sources estimate it could generate retail sales of $60 million in its first 12 months.
For Dior, Higher is also a chance to update the brand image for men. “Thanks to Hedi Slimane’s help, we could put together the ideal team of people to translate an image and aesthetic appropriate to the new Dior man,” continued Belli, referring, for instance, to Richard Avedon — who shot the 45-second TV and cinema advertisement featuring model Eric Van Nostrand.
Although the scent, name and packaging were developed before Slimane got involved with the project, the end-product is reminiscent of the modern spirit he has brought to Dior men’s wear. The tall, column-like bottle in a metal sheath, designed by Beef, echoes Slimane’s preference for slim silhouettes and sleek modernism. He did sign off on other aspects of the product, including the advertisement, plus the graphics and colors on the bottle that combines gray metal, white glass and soft-touch plastic for the spray.
Higher’s black, white and gray box with an asymmetric wave pattern at its base was created by H5, graphic designers who are well known for their CD covers for French electronic music artists.
Higher’s launch will be bolstered by print advertisements, also by Avedon, which feature a nude Van Nostrand — with strategically placed shadows — plus billboards, scent ads and Sophisticates.
“It was very important to have this man in his simple [state],” said Belli, who described the ad image as reminiscent of classical sculptures.
Van Nostrand stands next to a row of bottles positioned to resemble an urban skyline. The print ad’s tag line reads, “A scent of a man.”
“We’re always trying to balance the classicism of Dior with something much more contemporary,” said Belli.
This juxtaposition of traditional and modern elements is a favorite of Slimane’s, who decided to have Avedon’s classical images of Van Nordstrand accompanied by electronic music composed by the French group Air and heartbeat sounds in the video.
Dior also was daring when it came to Higher’s fresh aromatic juice. “It’s a very new combination for men’s fragrance,” said Belli. “It gives a very lofty, ‘higher’ feeling.”
It was created by Givaudan Roure’s Olivier Pescheux and Olivier Gillotin and includes fruity top notes such as pear, basil and frosted citrus; spicy heart notes such as cold spices, rosemary flower and cypress, and woody base notes of musk and pear wood.
The 50-ml. eau de toilette will retail for $37 and the 100-ml. version for $45 in France. There will also be a 75-ml. version available in travel-retail shops and five ancillaries, including a 200-ml. shower gel, which will retail for $16. All prices were translated into dollars using current exchange rates and are for France.
Dior plans to launch Higher at a party at the ultra-modern I.M. Pei pyramid in the courtyard of the Louvre museum here next Tuesday.
Parfums Christian Dior pulled out all the stops and hit a top note for the launch of its men’s scent, Higher Dior, Tuesday night.
Some 500 guests attended the soiree at the Musee du Louvre, in what was the first fragrance launch in the museum’s 800-plus-year history.
Beginning with a walk through the Greek wing, where participants admired classical statues and viewed TV monitors showing the face of Eric Van Nostrand, the model for Higher Dior’s advertisement, it ended in the gallery below the ultramodern I.M. Pei pyramid.
“I believe it is a quite intriguing experience to walk in the Louvre at midnight and get intimate with the Venus de Milo or Michelangelo’s [The Dying Slave] — depending on your predilection,” said Hedi Slimane, artistic director for men’s wear at Dior, of his choice of location.
“It’s fun to be under the I.M. Pei pyramid,” agreed Patrick Choel, president of the fragrance and beauty division at LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton, parent company of Parfums Christian Dior.
As reported, Higher Dior is slated for a worldwide introduction in September.
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kieran84

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Cheers Thorns. My mistake.

Sirgrotius did you keep the grey cashmere sweater? I think I might order it again and give it a second chance
 

SirGrotius

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Kieran - I ended up returning the grey cashmere, but I'm sort of picking with the neck opening. I like it to be tight with my collared shirts, and the wider opening did not look good on me. The fit otherwise was perfect and I loved the lighter grey color.
 

kieran84

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Cheers. I think I'd wear that style with a t-shirt or nothing underneath so that doesn't worry me too much.

I think I had expectations of it being a very sleek style in a medium grey like the permanent collection cashmere sweaters were, and I think that probably influenced my decision, rather than appreciating the kind of more substantial style that it is.
 

Lit Harington

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tattoos seem a bit at-odds with hedi's celine, at least in regards to the womenswear. otherwise kaia gerber is great though, has the right look and lifestyle
 

thorns

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How Hedi describes the ss21 character:
She’s “always the Parisian but with a new energy—she listens to rap/hip-hop music”—like the track by Princess Nokia
It goes back to how I feel like Hedi's Celine is more than just one image. Although one single individual can wear all the pieces from different collections, it feels schizophrenic. I feel like Hedi is creating a range of characters who are all different. It is tempting to want to pin the image to be one thing since it would be easier to understand, so I get how confusing it is. I feel like another way of looking at Celine is imagining a movie and there are different characters in the movie. Hedi is dressing them all.

These two Celine girls are different.

These two Celine boys are different.

I think it is quite fun, and when you do it on yourself you're creating a living piece of performance art.

1614790141503.png


I think this is what is necessary when creating your own character you want to portray. Drafting who they are, and what they represent. What clothes they wear and why.
 

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