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The official CELINE thread

thorns

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Fascinating that it turns out Celine released a CELINE logo plastic bag under Phoebe Philo, but nobody was freaking out that there was no accent on the E.

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Somehow this was celebrated...
 

moesarhan

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I totally love my calfskin, and I do have 3 different types of L17 too. Celine one is the most wearable to me, as you rightly pointed out on the leather. But mine is the first season, that could be a bit different comparing to current or previous season one.
Hi can you tell by a pic if this is the washed version or not? Theres one in my size online that I want to cop.
 

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Jabbathecunt

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Hi can you tell by a pic if this is the washed version or not? Theres one in my size online that I want to cop.
I like, you should get it if you want it. Also Im told that it is full grain leather not washed.
 
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Deonfate

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"I understand what Helmut did, because for me clothes should not be sacré. It’s only cotton, silk, gauze… I like that idea of finishing a period like he did and destroying everything. I really respect someone who isn’t stuck in something he did amazingly. It’s better to stop at the right time than doing something less good or too repetitive."
This is an extract from Anthony Vaccarello's interview about his Helmut Lang collaboration.
I have to say I love the subtle back and forth between Hedi and Anthony dissing each other without being overly explicit about it lol. Do you agree with him on this one?
 

GG Allin

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is anybody going to purchase anything from the Monochroms collection?
What is it?
"I understand what Helmut did, because for me clothes should not be sacré. It’s only cotton, silk, gauze… I like that idea of finishing a period like he did and destroying everything. I really respect someone who isn’t stuck in something he did amazingly. It’s better to stop at the right time than doing something less good or too repetitive."
This is an extract from Anthony Vaccarello's interview about his Helmut Lang collaboration.
I have to say I love the subtle back and forth between Hedi and Anthony dissing each other without being overly explicit about it lol. Do you agree with him on this one?
For me, the fact that it's just clothes is an argument in favor of doing the same thing over and over again that one does well. As a consumer, I just want to buy the shit I like, and I don't really care much about these abstract ideals, especially as they relate to something as trivial as fashion.

In other words, I'd be totally fine if Hedi Slimane started his own brand and, like APC or something, just put out the same clothes year after year, maybe with some subtle variation for the runways.

So, I think I disagree with Vacc on this, but I guess it's not clear to me what he's talking about.
 

alexanderdavide

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"I understand what Helmut did, because for me clothes should not be sacré. It’s only cotton, silk, gauze… I like that idea of finishing a period like he did and destroying everything. I really respect someone who isn’t stuck in something he did amazingly. It’s better to stop at the right time than doing something less good or too repetitive."
This is an extract from Anthony Vaccarello's interview about his Helmut Lang collaboration.
I have to say I love the subtle back and forth between Hedi and Anthony dissing each other without being overly explicit about it lol. Do you agree with him on this one?
From a consumer point of view, I totally appreciate designers/brands staying true to their DNA and releasing similar or even the same products, maybe with slight alterations. The reason I got into a brand is because they have products I like and I can identify with it. I would be disappointed if the brand moved into a direction I dislike. Furthermore, it is very convenient being able to buy the same or near similar product initially released years ago if one still likes it today or simply needs a new one.
 

thorns

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"I really respect someone who isn’t stuck in something he did amazingly. It’s better to stop at the right time than doing something less good or too repetitive."
I think this is a sentiment that many people can relate to. It takes a lot of courage to keep going after creating a best seller. Tons of people will fear that they will never reach the same success again and choose to quit while they're ahead. Not many people relate to Hedi's intensity and feverish commitment to chasing after a vision. Constantly refining something, constantly chasing perfection. To me, people who change too often feel inauthentic, but this is probably an unpopular opinion...especially in "fashion". In "fashion" people fetishize novelty over commitment. This statement is ironic coming from Anthony since he's just ripping off Hedi. He's been taking notes at what Hedi has been doing new at Celine and copying elements of it for Saint Laurent, or rehashing ss13 and trying to pass it off as something new since practically nobody remembers ss13. This betrays any sincerity in his words, and it just looks like a pathetic jab with little conviction behind his words. Kris Van Assche was truly able to re-create Dior Homme in his own vision after Hedi left. Anthony, on the other hand, is still chained to Hedi's legacy at Saint Laurent and Celine.

It is interesting that Anthony tried to tap into Helmut Lang to help design denim/workwear for the brand and got turned down. The resulting collaboration mirrors Hedi's collaboration with the Cesar Foundation. Both artists deal with transforming something old into something new through destruction and compression. The Celine Cesar Compression Project is miles more elegant and chic than the Helmut Lang collaboration, unfortunately. Also, the Helmut Lang collaboration feels something out of left field, while the Cesar Compression Project just feels right.

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If you happened to be walking down a street in Saint-Germain-des-Prés circa 1971, chances are you may have encountered an elegant Parisian woman or two with a mottled, golden rectangle the size of a piece of boxed chocolate hanging on a chain around her neck. Look closer at the pendants and you might have seen a warped length of ring, a medallion shaped like a pancake cooked on a too-hot pan, piles of chains and diamond studs fused together like fossils in petrified earth.
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These little totems were art pieces made by the French sculptor César, a founding member of the Nouveaux Réalistes group, who sought to honor the integrity of the everyday materials with which they worked.

Best known for the massive, compressed sculptures he made using scrapped car parts and hydraulic presses, César also worked for a time on a smaller, much more personal scale. In the early '70s, he began to ask friends and acquaintances to bring him the piles of unworn but sentimental jewelry—not-quite-right gifts, childhood charms, stones in dated settings—gathering dust in drawers. Then, working with a goldsmith, he would transform the lot into a single piece of modern, wearable sculpture.

Stéphanie Busuttil-Janssen, the founder and president of the Fondation César and the artist’s companion and muse until he passed in 1998, describes the jewelry compressions as “memory sticks,” that retain the emotional resonance of the source. “He liked to re-use scraps of old things, recycling and giving things a certain sense of rebirth and life,” she said, speaking on the phone from her home in Brussels earlier this month. “The idea is really about transforming something with a soul.”

The compressions were never shown in galleries, but rather commissioned by word of mouth in the sorts of circles chronicled by Slim Aarons and his camera. Brooke Shields had one made, so did the heir and international playboy Gunter Sachs (although Busuttil-Janssen didn’t say for whom). “It was always beautiful women who had one,” Busuttil-Janssen said with a laugh. “It was all very sexy, intellectual, jet set.” In 1973, Hachette published a book, complete with a textural gold cover, about the compressions, with essays by Françoise Giroud and James Baldwin, who was César’s neighbor in Saint-Paul-de-Vence.
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