***The official Alden thread *** Share enthusiasm, reviews, sizing, advice, and photos.

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by jet, Nov 3, 2008.

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  1. airportlobby

    airportlobby Senior member

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    Same thing happens with my suede boots. I've considered sewing the tongue to the side, at least a portion of the way up, but haven't done it. I suspect it isn't as much of a problem w/o speed lacing. Normal lacing seems to achieve a tighter fit on the leg.
     
  2. Dewey

    Dewey Senior member

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    For best break-in I change up the lacing on my boots every time I clean/condition/polish them.

    Usually I do some kind of criss-cross lacing but the key is working the leather around the eyelets in the other direction. If a section between eyelets bows away from my ankle, I'll lace them so it's pushed back in. Maybe if they were laced X X X ("barker black" style) I'll lace them I X X X. Mainly it's some kind of criss-cross back and forth. Etc. etc. This only seems important in the first few months when they are breaking in.

    Also condition the hell out of the tongue & around the eyelets if the shoes are calf.

    The point is the leather does not settle into any one pattern & develop deep creases that cause the boot & tongue to get into bad fitting habits.

    So I'd try changing the lacing if your tongue always slides to one side. Maybe you can get it to slide to the other side. Bottom line is for sure the boot was not designed for the tongue to flop to the side.

    Another idea would be adding a tongue cushion -- solid brown wool ones from Hapad Inc are best -- if your boots are laced totally closed & there's still enough looseness for the tongue to slide as you walk. One pair of my boots has these cushions under the speed laces. It's the only way to lace the ankle tight enough. Probably the tongue would move without them.


    Back to the Thomas heel question -- only some of the Indys have them? I thought maybe they were a feature that often went with the trubalance last.
     
  3. breakz

    breakz Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Question on these: are they good winter boots? They're suede but they were also "weather-proofed," supposedly.
     
  4. DrZRM

    DrZRM Senior member

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    Also, I googled around but should I avoid wearing cordovan in the rain? I found some threads on askandy and people were just going back and forth over whether or not cordovan holds up well in the wet. I don't want to buy a 700 pair of shoes (likely on a commando sole) and then have to check weather reports before venturing out in them. Overall are cordovan boots tougher for city living or should I stick to something more utilitarian like the Indy? Right now I'm waffeling between Trickers Stow, 405's, and at the high end, #8 NST.

    My understanding (and my personal experience) is that the lighter colors (whiskey, ravello, and cigar) are more likely to get water spots if they get wet. It does not damage the hide, but it can take a while to go away. I find a bit of Creme Nubiana (sold at Franco's and recommended by Ron Rider) takes the spots out of my whiskey longwings when they get wet. #8 is much less susceptible to water spotting than my whiskey and ravello (I have no cigar yet), I have several #8 shoes that I generally grab if it is raining and they have no water spotting at all.
     
  5. arrow

    arrow Senior member

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    My contribution to this great thread! Hi-Res pics from Winn Perry... ENJOY

    Winn Perry x Alden Round 3 (Model 40712H)

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  6. interlockingny

    interlockingny Senior member

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    My understanding (and my personal experience) is that the lighter colors (whiskey, ravello, and cigar) are more likely to get water spots if they get wet. It does not damage the hide, but it can take a while to go away. I find a bit of Creme Nubiana (sold at Franco's and recommended by Ron Rider) takes the spots out of my whiskey longwings when they get wet. #8 is much less susceptible to water spotting than my whiskey and ravello (I have no cigar yet), I have several #8 shoes that I generally grab if it is raining and they have no water spotting at all.

    Thanks for the advice. Cigar is a light color?
     
  7. jaydc7

    jaydc7 Senior member

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    lighter tham no.8 but darker than whiskey and ravello
     
  8. jet

    jet Persian Bro

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    cigar is king
     
  9. slide13

    slide13 Senior member

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    damn those are good looking boots!
     
  10. KitAkira

    KitAkira Wait! Wait! I gots an opinion!

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    Question on these: are they good winter boots? They're suede but they were also "weather-proofed," supposedly.
    Depends on how harsh your winters are. With a crepe sole and what looks like heavily oiled suede, they should survive rain and maybe a teensy bit of snow so long as they're in rotation and allowed a day or so to recover between exposures. Basically, NO if you plan on trekking through blizzard conditions daily, YES if you live in a more temperate climate where you just have to worry about a spot of rain All based on just how they look though, I have no experience with that leather
     
  11. the shah

    the shah Persian Bro #2 and enabler-in-chief

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    is the crepe sole ok in horrendous snow? i've seen conflicting reports...
     
  12. Biggie_Robs

    Biggie_Robs Senior member

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    I don't wear my crepe soles in snow.
     
  13. zippyh

    zippyh Senior member

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    random question, but does anyone have advice for getting the tongue of an indy boot to stop from sliding to the side after a couple hours of wear?
    these are the only boots i own that do this. no idea why they do, but its annoying.


    ^^ yea me too, and the only boot that does this as well, probably because the cordovan tongue is so thick it can't develop a "stay put" crease and mold in place the way my other boots do. I think it's something you just have to live with unless someone else has a fix.

    Same thing happens with my suede boots. I've considered sewing the tongue to the side, at least a portion of the way up, but haven't done it. I suspect it isn't as much of a problem w/o speed lacing. Normal lacing seems to achieve a tighter fit on the leg.

    There's a recent thread in MC about this issue.
    http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?p=2705488
     
  14. breakz

    breakz Senior member

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    Depends on how harsh your winters are. With a crepe sole and what looks like heavily oiled suede, they should survive rain and maybe a teensy bit of snow so long as they're in rotation and allowed a day or so to recover between exposures.

    Basically, NO if you plan on trekking through blizzard conditions daily, YES if you live in a more temperate climate where you just have to worry about a spot of rain

    All based on just how they look though, I have no experience with that leather


    Cool, I won't be trekking through knee-deep (or even shin-deep) snow--just a ton of rain. These should work.
     
  15. zazaza

    zazaza Senior member

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    i'd posted before about a pair of indy seconds i bought from shoemart in which the upper started to separate from the welt on one of the boots. I'd contacted Ed at shoemart about this and was told to send them back. he's since responded saying he fixed them and that i'd be completely satisfied.

    please take a look at these photos of the repair that was made.
    curious to hear what people think and if they'd be ok with this

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