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The nuances of wingtip styles. Why does this pair look 'weird' ?

Reevolving

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For example, what is it about this AE Hinsdale wingtip (pulled from an old thread) that looks different? Is it just the open vs. closed lacing? Or is it more? 1- The brogue seems to go higher up the side of the vamp. 2- Also, the tiny secondary holes are not in the brogue. 3- Is seems to have a more casual vibe than the shoes below. Why? 4- The toe box looks a little boxy, as it rises straight up, instead of curving gradually. 5- The brogue holes seem to be blacked out, instead of just showing the same color leather underneath.
Compare it to the AE Cambridge & the AE McAllister
 

Slewfoot

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The biggest difference is that the first one is a derby and the second an oxford. The latter has that extra brogueing at the bottom of the laces so the vamp's empty space does not seem as extended. There's no rhyme or reason in terms of the types or sizes of perforations used. All depends on the maker. No brogues are exactly the same even if they are called brogues. Just go through the Shoe Pictoral Index and you'll see tons of examples.
 

meister

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Originally Posted by Reevolving
For example, what is it about this AE Hinsdale wingtip (pulled from an old thread) that looks different?
Is it just the open vs. closed lacing? Or is it more?

1- The brogue seems to go higher up the side of the vamp.
2- Also, the tiny secondary holes are not in the brogue.
3- Is seems to have a more casual vibe than the shoes below. Why?
4- The toe box looks a little boxy, as it rises straight up, instead of curving gradually.
5- The brogue holes seem to be blacked out, instead of just showing the same color leather underneath.



Compare it to the AE Cambridge & the AE McAllister


The broguing is too high up the vamp on an Italian style last ...the McCallister is the way I like it.
 

MyOtherLife

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Originally Posted by Reevolving

The shoe in the photo is 3-5 sizes too big for the person wearing them. Notice the gap at the back. had these been loafers, they would have fallen right off his feet. Sadly, this kind of mis-judgement is common with younger or less experienced men. They are under a misconception that women believe a man who has big feet, has a big weenie. This is in fact, mostly (99%) not true. Since their young female counterparts believe this myth, it validates them buying shoes that are far too big. It's getting him laid so why stop? Many modern running shoes today have removeable insoles or footbeds. That same running shoe itself may very well be a size 12 without that large foamy insole. With the insole, it reduces the inside cavity to a size 10.5. An un-suspecting customer, who ordinarily takes a 10.5, ends uo buying a size 12 in a running shoe, and since he mostly wears running shoes he is convinced that he takes size 12 all around. Now he goes to buy dress shoes and ends up buying a shoe that is 2.5 - 3 sizes too large. Since he knows no better (nor do his friends) he walks in shoes that are clownish in size. The only people telling him they are too large are probably his loving parents or family, but to his mind, they are telling him he has a small weenie. Hi reasoning is that he can't possibly go out into the world with everyone thinking he has a small weenie, now can he? So he chooses instead, to be a well hung clown instead. Play this further. A young woman who also knows no better, believes that by saying yes to him, she is in store for a sexual treat beyond her dreams & imagination. Once those shoes come off, what will happen? a) she will be in stitches of laughter at the small-footed (and in a moment small-weenie'd) clown in front of her, and laugh him to flaccidity (possibly secretly hoping it will get bigger when stimulated?). b) feel the maternal instincts within her awaken; seeing little boy-in-the-man before her. c) think 'wtf is this?' or possibly all of the above. Again, if this strategy is getting him laid, and this was his intention, he'll continue. If he goes for a job interview in oversized shoes, this will not reflect well on him.
 

tonylumpkin

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To my eye, the biggest difference in the Hinsdale and other wing tip brogues is that the brougeing on the Hinsdale carries back from the vamp at a constant rate of decent. In most other wing tips the brogueing moves toward the rear of the shoe at a fairly high level and then drops to the welt rather quickly near the midpoint of the shoe. The Hinsdales drops, pretty much, in a straight line.
 

Reevolving

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You're right. The Oxford's have that 2nd row of brogue, so the toecap brogue must drop sharply to avoid overlap. The Hinsdale has the room for the brogue to go much further back in the shoe. Notice how it almost reaches the heel? Look at the original picture alongside the stock photo. I think the stock photo is a much better look pair of shoes. As RangerP noted, the "real life" photo seems to be much narrower than the stock, and has weird proportions.
 

Patek

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Originally Posted by Man Of Lint
Many modern running shoes today have removeable insoles or footbeds.
That same running shoe itself may very well be a size 12 without that large foamy insole.
With the insole, it reduces the inside cavity to a size 10.5.
An un-suspecting customer, who ordinarily takes a 10.5, ends uo buying a size 12 in a running shoe,


Besides the rest of the rambling, I actually learned something from this. I wear a English size 11 and a US 12 or 11.5 depending on the maker. Whenever I buy running shoes, I have to buy size 13 and I never understood this. Now, this makes sense.
 

Raoul Duke

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Originally Posted by Patek
Besides the rest of the rambling, I actually learned something from this. I wear a English size 11 and a US 12 or 11.5 depending on the maker. Whenever I buy running shoes, I have to buy size 13 and I never understood this. Now, this makes sense.

I found this interesting as well. I wear a 13 in running shoes, but I can squeeze an 11 in dress shoes. This discrepancy led to a couple poor purchases.
 

lee_44106

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I think it looks "weird" because you've identified the maker as Allen Edmonds.

Had you said G&G or Lobb then there'd be praises all around.
 

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