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The Moving Arts' 100 Greatest Movies of All Time List Unveiled

RFX45

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I know there are a lot of movie fanatics here so it would be interesting how SF dissects the list.


http://www.firstshowing.net/2010/11/...s-of-all-time/



#1. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Kubrick)
#2. Citizen Kane (1941, Welles)
#3. The Godfather (1972, Coppola)
#4. Andrei Rublev (1966, Tarkovsky)
#5. The Rules of the Game (1939, Renoir)
#6. Casablanca (1942, Curtiz)
#7. Vertigo (1958, Hitchcock)
#8. La Dolce Vita (1960, Fellini)
#9. Seven Samurai (1954, Kurosawa)
#10. The Godfather Pt. II (1974, Coppola)
#11. The Third Man (1949, Reed)
#12. The Wizard of Oz (1939, Fleming)
#13. Dr. Strangelove (1964, Kubrick)
#14. Goodfellas (1990, Scorsese)
#15. Aguirre: The Wrath of God (1972, Herzog)
#16. 8½ (1963, Fellini)
#17. Singin' In The Rain (1952, Donen, Kelly)
#18. Raging Bull (1980, Scorsese)
#19. Lawrence of Arabia (1962, Lean)
#20. Solaris (1972, Tarkovsky)
#21. The Night of the Hunter (1955, Laughton)
#22. On the Waterfront (1954, Kazan)
#23. Intolerance (1916, Griffith)
#24. L'Atalante (1934, Vigo)
#25. Apocalypse Now (1979, Coppola)
#26. Birth of a Nation (1915, Griffith)
#27. Battleship Potemkin (1915, Eisenstein)
#28. Taxi Driver (1976, Scorsese)
#29. Chinatown (1974, Polanski)
#30. Rashomon (1950, Kurosawa)
#31. The Searchers (1956, Ford)
#32. The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (1966, Leone)
#33. Yojimbo (1961, Kurosawa)
#34. Nights of Cabiria (1957, Fellini)
#35. The Curse of the Cat People (1944, Fritsch, Wise)
#36. Annie Hall (1977, Allen)
#37. Tokyo Story (1953, Ozu)
#38. M (1931, Lang)
#39. Brief Encounter (1945, Lean)
#40. Rear Window (1954, Hitchcock)
#41. Barry Lyndon (1975, Kubrick)
#42. Ikiru (1952, Kirosawa)
#43. A Clockwork Orange (1971, Kubrick)
#44. Metropolis (1927, Lang)
#45. City Lights (1931, Chaplin)
#46. Bashu, The Little Stranger (1986, Beizai)
#47. A Streetcar Named Desire (1951, Kazan)
#48. Badlands (1973, Malick)
#49. The Asphalt Jungle (1950, Huston)
#50. Pather Panchali (Ray, 1955)
#51. Touch of Evil (1958, Welles, Keller)
#52. The 400 Blows (1959, Truffaut)
#53. The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928, Dreyer)
#54. King Kong (1933, Shoedsack, Cooper)
#55. Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927, Murnau)
#56. L'Avventura (1960, Antonioni)
#57. The Empire Strikes Back (1980, Kirshner)
#58. The Apartment (1960, Wilder)
#59. The General (1927, Keaton, Bruckman)
#60. Pierrot le Fou (1965, Godard)
#61. The Seventh Seal (1957, Bergman)
#62. Talk to Her (2002, Almodóvar)
#63. McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971, Altman)
#64. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962, Ford)
#65. Do the Right Thing (1989, Lee)
#66. Pulp Fiction (1994, Tarantino)
#67. Ugetsu (1953, Mizoguchi)
#68. Manhattan (1979, Allen)
#69. Star Wars (1977, Lucas)
#70. F for Fake (1973, Welles)
#71. Blue Velvet (1986, Lynch)
#72. The Leopard (1963, Visconti)
#73. Modern Times (1936, Chaplin)
#74. Sweet Smell of Success (1957, Mackendrick)
#75. Yi Yi (2000, Yang)
#76. Grand Illusion (1937, Renoir)
#77. Out of the Past (1947, Tourneur)
#78. Mulholland Dr. (2001, Lynch)
#79. Wild Strawberries (1957, Bergman)
#80. Synecdoche, New York (2008, Kaufman)
#81. Psycho (1960, Hitchcock)
#82. Nayakan (1987, Ratnam)
#83. Wings of Desire (1987, Wenders)
#84. The Big Sleep (1946, Hawks)
#85. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004, Gondry)
#86. Ulysses' Gaze (1995, Angelopoulos)
#87. Notorious (1946, Hitchcock)
#88. Nashville (1975, Altman)
#89. Days of Heaven (1978, Mallick)
#90. The Maltese Falcon (1941, Huston)
#91. The Bicycle Thief (1948, de Sica)
#92. A Touch of Zen (1971, Hu)
#93. Fargo (1996, Coen, Coen)
#94. Breathless (1960, Godard)
#95. Children of Paradise (1945, CarnÃ
)
#96. The Wind Will Carry Us (1999, Kiarostami)
#97. Rio Bravo (1959, Hawks)
#98. Jaws (1975, Spielberg)
#99. There Will Be Blood (2007, P.T. Anderson)
#100. Japón (2002, Carlos Reygadas)
 

mordecai

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I love how Intolerance always makes these lists in order to justify Birth of a Nation. They even took it a step further here and bumped it up past Birth. Very happy to see Night of the Hunter so high up, and very confused to see Synecdoche on there at all. Some other odd choices. I like that they included McCabe and Mrs. Miller
 

Manton

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I've never even heard of #4.

Does that make me a philistine?
 

Dr. Mabuse

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It's not a bad list, most of the giants are there. It's heartening to see two Tarkovsky films in the top twenty. The man had/has no equal as a filmaker.

It's criminal that Ozu is rated so low, and Bresson isn't on there at all.
 

ter1413

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That list is BS. No "The Hustler!" No "Double Indemnity!? Am I missing something!
 

Blackhood

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As a film student, I have always been in the minority when discussing top 100 lists.
I firmly believe that it is important to include modern, popularist films because of their impact on film culture. Titanic for example may not be a masterpiece of script writing but it broke box office records and proved that a film more than three hours long could be shown in a commercial cinema.

Avatar for example heralded the age of 3-D cinema, and is as deserving of a place on the list as Metropolis or Space Odyssey. Both of these films had an equally revolutionary impact on the science fiction genre, but it appears that many critics are too fearful of being made to look like fools by the passage of time to include many modern films at all.
 

gdl203

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Originally Posted by Blackhood
As a film student, I have always been in the minority when discussing top 100 lists.
I firmly believe that it is important to include modern, popularist films because of their impact on film culture. Titanic for example may not be a masterpiece of script writing but it broke box office records and proved that a film more than three hours long could be shown in a commercial cinema.

Avatar for example heralded the age of 3-D cinema, and is as deserving of a place on the list as Metropolis or Space Odyssey. Both of these films had an equally revolutionary impact on the science fiction genre, but it appears that many critics are too fearful of being made to look like fools by the passage of time to include many modern films at all.


I don't know that the commercial impact is a good measure of whether a film is either good or important. The intrinsic merits of the film (writing, directing, acting, editing, musical illustration) are more important to most people who care about ranking films for posterity.

That said, having two Godfathers in the top 10 here seems to contradict my statement. wtf

Manton - have you not heard of Andrei Roublev or have you not heard of Tarkovsky at all? He was a great film maker (many consider him the best ever) - Roublev may not be the easiest intro to his work though. Solaris is pretty cool and much better IMO than the Soderbergh remake.
 

Douglas

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I had no idea Yojimbo was so highly regarded.
 

mordecai

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Originally Posted by Blackhood
As a film student, I have always been in the minority when discussing top 100 lists.
I firmly believe that it is important to include modern, popularist films because of their impact on film culture. Titanic for example may not be a masterpiece of script writing but it broke box office records and proved that a film more than three hours long could be shown in a commercial cinema.

Avatar for example heralded the age of 3-D cinema, and is as deserving of a place on the list as Metropolis or Space Odyssey. Both of these films had an equally revolutionary impact on the science fiction genre, but it appears that many critics are too fearful of being made to look like fools by the passage of time to include many modern films at all.


it says greatest, not most popular. what you're describing is what awards shows are for.
 

Blackhood

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Originally Posted by mharwitt
it says greatest, not most popular. what you're describing is what awards shows are for.

To a degree but surely a measure of the "greatness" of artwork in any form is at least in part measured by its reception? I'm not suggesting that Avatar is better than Godfather, but we still see Lumiere films as seminal moments in cinematography. I just feel that one shouldn't be afraid to put films in simply because they don't have the snob-factor that most of that list do.
 

mordecai

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Originally Posted by Blackhood
To a degree but surely a measure of the "greatness" of artwork in any form is at least in part measured by its reception? I'm not suggesting that Avatar is better than Godfather, but we still see Lumiere films as seminal moments in cinematography. I just feel that one shouldn't be afraid to put films in simply because they don't have the snob-factor that most of that list do.
I don't see the Lumiere brothers on there either. Doesn't take a snob to see that James Cameron has never made a film better than any of the ones on that list, (except Synecdoche, NY)
 

Dr. Mabuse

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Originally Posted by Blackhood
To a degree but surely a measure of the "greatness" of artwork in any form is at least in part measured by its reception? I'm not suggesting that Avatar is better than Godfather, but we still see Lumiere films as seminal moments in cinematography. I just feel that one shouldn't be afraid to put films in simply because they don't have the snob-factor that most of that list do.

Half of the top ten are popular and highly regarded English language films. This list is fairly low on the "snob-factor" compared to others. Also, any list with Star Wars has some voters taking your criteria into consideration. I'm not defending the whole list but I think it's a pretty standard list with a few exceptions.
 

gdl203

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As far as I'm concerned Terminator and Aliens are better films than There Will be Blood - but I'm a PTA h8er
 

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