The MBA Thread

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Tarmac, Aug 28, 2008.

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  1. ashpool

    ashpool Senior member

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    I wonder is it better to do MBA/JD at my current law school (Dalhousie .... Canada ahem...) or get my JD, work for a while, make some $, and try to get into Harvard/Wharton?
     
  2. BC2012

    BC2012 Senior member

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    I wonder is it better to do MBA/JD at my current law school (Dalhousie .... Canada ahem...) or get my JD, work for a while, make some $, and try to get into Harvard/Wharton?

    What do you think the MBA will add to the JD, outside of being an avenue for a career change/shift into in-house counsel? I think that's what you need to ask yourself.
     
  3. L.R.

    L.R. Senior member

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    I would love to know the Quant vs Poet Gmat scores. I`ve been given to understand that the reason for the 700 + averages at tier 1 schools is due to the huge number of people from quant backgrounds applying and getting in.


    The scores of the people from non-traditional backgrounds would be interesting.
     
  4. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos In Time Out

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    I would love to know the Quant vs Poet Gmat scores. I`ve been given to understand that the reason for the 700 + averages at tier 1 schools is due to the huge number of people from quant backgrounds applying and getting in.


    The scores of the people from non-traditional backgrounds would be interesting.


    Quant is given a lot more weight in the admissions process, if not necessarily in the calculation of total score. A traditional "poet" score (extremely high verbal, middling to low quant) will almost never put someone in contention for a top 10 school, even if the cume is over 700. It's considered too imbalanced a score. On the other hand, an illiterate quant (700+, high quant, low verbal) has a pretty good shot at a top school.

    My score was higher on verbal than on quant, but the spread was not dramatic because I am a genius. For your health!
     
  5. nerdykarim

    nerdykarim Senior member

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    Quant is given a lot more weight in the admissions process, if not necessarily in the calculation of total score. A traditional "poet" score (extremely high verbal, middling to low quant) will almost never put someone in contention for a top 10 school, even if the cume is over 700. It's considered too imbalanced a score. On the other hand, an illiterate quant (700+, high quant, low verbal) has a pretty good shot at a top school.

    This is interesting--I've never thought about GMAT like this.

    I made 700+ w/ high verbal low quant and had a surprisingly difficult time getting into my school (which isn't even a top MBA program).
     
  6. BC2012

    BC2012 Senior member

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    Quant is given a lot more weight in the admissions process, if not necessarily in the calculation of total score. A traditional "poet" score (extremely high verbal, middling to low quant) will almost never put someone in contention for a top 10 school, even if the cume is over 700. It's considered too imbalanced a score. On the other hand, an illiterate quant (700+, high quant, low verbal) has a pretty good shot at a top school.

    My score was higher on verbal than on quant, but the spread was not dramatic because I am a genius. For your health!


    This is because MBA programs love to play up their technical difficulty - when, in reality, you barely use math even in a finance focused MBA. When I say math, I mean calc and above. And the GMAT doesn't really test math ability, it tests logic ability and the ability to spot false answers and whatnot. I don't think it covered anything above 9th grade Algebra II.

    In reality, MBA programs would probably be better off putting a heavier emphasis on verbal scores - nothing worse than graduating a bunch of desk-chained quants that have no interpersonal skills or ability to write memos/emails. Yet, this is the majority of grads at many schools. Maybe that's fine for IB and research analyst roles but for general management and marketing (and other "soft" roles that fill up the majority of positions for most MBAs) higher quant isn't probably the best thing.
     
  7. mkarim

    mkarim Senior member

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    the GMAT doesn't really test math ability, it tests logic ability and the ability to spot false answers and whatnot. I don't think it covered anything above 9th grade Algebra II.

    In reality, MBA programs would probably be better off putting a heavier emphasis on verbal scores - nothing worse than graduating a bunch of desk-chained quants that have no interpersonal skills or ability to write memos/emails.


    +100
     
  8. Bhowie

    Bhowie Senior member

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    Isn't a higher verbal score a better indication of higher IQ?
     
  9. pebblegrain

    pebblegrain Senior member

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    Quant is given a lot more weight in the admissions process, if not necessarily in the calculation of total score. A traditional "poet" score (extremely high verbal, middling to low quant) will almost never put someone in contention for a top 10 school, even if the cume is over 700. It's considered too imbalanced a score. On the other hand, an illiterate quant (700+, high quant, low verbal) has a pretty good shot at a top school.

    My score was higher on verbal than on quant, but the spread was not dramatic because I am a genius. For your health!


    Disagree. They don't care as long as you are above 70th percentile on both. And the math is easy anyway, it doesn't measure your quant ability
     
  10. CunningSmeagol

    CunningSmeagol Senior member

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    Quant is given a lot more weight in the admissions process, if not necessarily in the calculation of total score. A traditional "poet" score (extremely high verbal, middling to low quant) will almost never put someone in contention for a top 10 school, even if the cume is over 700. It's considered too imbalanced a score. On the other hand, an illiterate quant (700+, high quant, low verbal) has a pretty good shot at a top school.

    My score was higher on verbal than on quant, but the spread was not dramatic because I am a genius. For your health!


    Disagree. A stereotypical Asian/Indian who has for his entire life seen academics as some kind of math contest will get your illiterate quant score, high 700's, and will have virtually no shot at a top school. These guys represent a huge proportion of applicants these days. If you've met the 80% quant threshold, I think a huge verbal (50+) makes you stand out a bit.

    Still, I think the importance of the GMAT is overstated. But what the fuck do I know.
     
  11. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos In Time Out

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    This is because MBA programs love to play up their technical difficulty - when, in reality, you barely use math even in a finance focused MBA. When I say math, I mean calc and above.
    I did a shitload of multivariate calc and high-level statistics in my bschool classes. Not sure what University of Phoenix was like for you, however. [​IMG] Agree with your points that verbal should be counted for a lot more than it is. Alas, that is not the case, and all trends I've seen are pointing to even less of an emphasis placed on rhetorical ability or verbal competency, let alone fluency, let alone potency. A real shame, too.
     
  12. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos In Time Out

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    Disagree. They don't care as long as you are above 70th percentile on both. And the math is easy anyway, it doesn't measure your quant ability

    Nothing you just said addressed the point of mine with which you "disagree."
     
  13. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos In Time Out

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    Disagree. A stereotypical Asian/Indian who has for his entire life seen academics as some kind of math contest will get your illiterate quant score, high 700's, and will have virtually no shot at a top school. These guys represent a huge proportion of applicants these days. If you've met the 80% quant threshold, I think a huge verbal (50+) makes you stand out a bit. Still, I think the importance of the GMAT is overstated. But what the fuck do I know.
    My point, which keeps getting missed evidently, is that quant is weighed much more heavily by admissions folks than verbal is. That is a fact. Furthermore, my point was that the far preferable (as far as admissions chances are concerned) type of wild split is the wild split in favor of quant, rather than the wild split in favor of verbal. While it's true that there are a ton of high-quant/low-verbal Asians and Indians out there, the fact of the matter is that quite a few of them end up in top schools. On the other hand, maybe 1 out of every 1000 "poet" scoring people ends up at a top school. Obviously it's better to have a balanced score with a high cume. That is beside the point I was addressing.
     
  14. BC2012

    BC2012 Senior member

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    I did a shitload of multivariate calc and high-level statistics in my bschool classes. Not sure what University of Phoenix was like for you, however.

    What classes did you do multivariate calc in? And specifically in which applications of finance? I've taken stats and econometrics but I guarantee I won't be taking beyond econometrics.

    Please, since you came back with such a shitty attitude about it, please feel free to tell us exactly how you used multivariate calculus and in what detail.
     
  15. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos In Time Out

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    What classes did you do multivariate calc in? And specifically in which applications of finance? I've taken stats and econometrics but I guarantee I won't be taking beyond econometrics. Please, since you came back with such a shitty attitude about it, please feel free to tell us exactly how you used multivariate calculus and in what detail.
    First of all, calm down. The UoP thing was supposed to have been a lighthearted jab, which I soon edited to add a requisite, softening smiley to. Evidently you were already in mid-screed when that editing took place, however. To answer your question, Black-Scholes is a pretty well known and fairly basic partial differential model. If you haven't gotten there yet, you're speaking out of turn. There are plenty more where that came from. I don't mean to be rude, but challenging me on this shit when it's clear that you are speaking out of your ass is not doing you favors.
     

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