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The Least Official Natalino Appreciation Thread

Rhodia

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I just got the Natalino tobacco linen suit. 40L/34. Compared to SM SS23 34 contemporary trouser, Natalino seat/thigh feels a bit looser. The thigh might actually measure the same but it's a little less restrictive when sitting, I think because the back rise is higher. The leg has a slight gradual taper vs SM looks very straight leg on me.

I was in the same boat. My SM 34s are tighter than ideal but not bad for RTW. Never tried the 35s. Natalino only has even sizes and 36 seems too big. Curious how SM updated fit compares. Might hit the sweet spot.

Regarding the jacket the shoulders fit really well but chest and waist is a bit full for my body. For reference SM 40L on me requires only sleeves shortened a quarter inch, otherwise nearly perfect but shoulders a touch narrow (41 shoulders would probably be ideal).

It's at the tailor's but I can post measurements/pics when I get it back.
I concur with this on the trousers. I can wear Natalino, but not the old SM. I intend on trying the new SM High-Rise cut to compare (the back rise and seat are supposed to be improved).

My only issue with the Natalino trousers is that they're inconsistent across fabrics and colors. Last season I bought the Tropical Wool and the Linen. The linen fits a full size larger in every way (and it stretches out with wear). Natalino does allude to this in the description however.

But even the Tropical Wool is slimmer in one color opposed to the other. This is not an issue exclusive to Natalino by any means -- Spier and Anglo-Italian have the same problem, and I'm sure many other manufacturers do as well.

Just be aware of variations and if you're on the border of sizes, try two.
 

2942

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Could someone that received the Mock Leno jacket please share the buttons the jacket came with?

Mine was shipped without spare buttons. I reached out to CS and they sent a new pack, but they were wrong ones. I raised the issue and they sent a second set and they still don't match the ones attached to the jacket. I'm looking to confirm I'm not going crazy haha
 
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I hadn't heard of this brand until, like Eurydice stepping on a snake, I stumbled upon it here in this forum. After perusing its website, social media and other promotional literature, I am staggered that nobody on this thread has mentioned the obvious and rather suspect similarities between this brand and Anglo Italian. But similarities would really be too neutral a term. Styling, cloth choices, design elements, typefaces, even tote bags--all seem to have been plagiarized by the former from the latter. One of the owners and models even sports curly ginger locks. Is there a malign force at work here? Is it I-smell-a-Rat-alino's plan to undercut the prices of Anglo Italian by using cheaper suppliers (from Portugal etc) and inferior manufacturing (half-canvas construction etc)? We all accept that fashion is largely based on appropriation and homage. Sometimes we even accept direct copying especially when the company being copied is a corporate behemoth inflating its prices with unjustifiable speed and relish in order to remain exclusive. Evidently Anglo Italian is not one of these brands. If I were connected with them, I would be spitting feathers and throwing punches. Their staff and owner are some of the friendliest people in an unfriendly industry. They must have worked hard to establish an elegant identity and distinctive style.They must have worked even harder to cultivate an appreciation for that style in a customer base large enough to keep their business afloat.

Perhaps I'm mistaken. Perhaps Tatalino's intentions are noble. For all I know they might, though it strains credulity, have opened their London store under the aegis and with the blessings of AIC. I have no connection with either brand--perhaps someone more enlightened can provide further details, details that might of course exonerate Tatalino.
The lines are often blurred (sometimes deliberately) between plagiarism and its more benevolent brother, appreciative imitation. Do we, as relatively well-heeled shoppers, have a duty to support brands, even when more expensive, who have a genuine aesthetic vision, and who take creative risks in order to realise it (creative risks that are reflected in the final price of the garment or object)? I think we do. And it is not merely a question either of legality or of some simplified Friedmannian 'it's the nature of capitalism, deal with it'.

We have both an ethical duty (plagiarism is loathsome and quite lame) and, over a longer period, a self-serving aesthetic motivation (we should want brands such as Anglo Italian--- unique, creative, committed to higher standards of traditional manufacturing and customer service-- to survive and flourish and not, as far as I can judge, ones such as this-- derivative, mediocre, cost-cutting, opportunistic etc.)
 

CLH03

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Jan 27, 2023
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I hadn't heard of this brand until, like Eurydice stepping on a snake, I stumbled upon it here in this forum. After perusing its website, social media and other promotional literature, I am staggered that nobody on this thread has mentioned the obvious and rather suspect similarities between this brand and Anglo Italian. But similarities would really be too neutral a term. Styling, cloth choices, design elements, typefaces, even tote bags--all seem to have been plagiarized by the former from the latter. One of the owners and models even sports curly ginger locks. Is there a malign force at work here? Is it I-smell-a-Rat-alino's plan to undercut the prices of Anglo Italian by using cheaper suppliers (from Portugal etc) and inferior manufacturing (half-canvas construction etc)? We all accept that fashion is largely based on appropriation and homage. Sometimes we even accept direct copying especially when the company being copied is a corporate behemoth inflating its prices with unjustifiable speed and relish in order to remain exclusive. Evidently Anglo Italian is not one of these brands. If I were connected with them, I would be spitting feathers and throwing punches. Their staff and owner are some of the friendliest people in an unfriendly industry. They must have worked hard to establish an elegant identity and distinctive style.They must have worked even harder to cultivate an appreciation for that style in a customer base large enough to keep their business afloat.

Perhaps I'm mistaken. Perhaps Tatalino's intentions are noble. For all I know they might, though it strains credulity, have opened their London store under the aegis and with the blessings of AIC. I have no connection with either brand--perhaps someone more enlightened can provide further details, details that might of course exonerate Tatalino.
The lines are often blurred (sometimes deliberately) between plagiarism and its more benevolent brother, appreciative imitation. Do we, as relatively well-heeled shoppers, have a duty to support brands, even when more expensive, who have a genuine aesthetic vision, and who take creative risks in order to realise it (creative risks that are reflected in the final price of the garment or object)? I think we do. And it is not merely a question either of legality or of some simplified Friedmannian 'it's the nature of capitalism, deal with it'.

We have both an ethical duty (plagiarism is loathsome and quite lame) and, over a longer period, a self-serving aesthetic motivation (we should want brands such as Anglo Italian--- unique, creative, committed to higher standards of traditional manufacturing and customer service-- to survive and flourish and not, as far as I can judge, ones such as this-- derivative, mediocre, cost-cutting, opportunistic etc.)
Not that deep. 2 very different companies.
 

mossrockss

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I hadn't heard of this brand until, like Eurydice stepping on a snake, I stumbled upon it here in this forum. After perusing its website, social media and other promotional literature, I am staggered that nobody on this thread has mentioned the obvious and rather suspect similarities between this brand and Anglo Italian. But similarities would really be too neutral a term. Styling, cloth choices, design elements, typefaces, even tote bags--all seem to have been plagiarized by the former from the latter. One of the owners and models even sports curly ginger locks. Is there a malign force at work here? Is it I-smell-a-Rat-alino's plan to undercut the prices of Anglo Italian by using cheaper suppliers (from Portugal etc) and inferior manufacturing (half-canvas construction etc)? We all accept that fashion is largely based on appropriation and homage. Sometimes we even accept direct copying especially when the company being copied is a corporate behemoth inflating its prices with unjustifiable speed and relish in order to remain exclusive. Evidently Anglo Italian is not one of these brands. If I were connected with them, I would be spitting feathers and throwing punches. Their staff and owner are some of the friendliest people in an unfriendly industry. They must have worked hard to establish an elegant identity and distinctive style.They must have worked even harder to cultivate an appreciation for that style in a customer base large enough to keep their business afloat.

Perhaps I'm mistaken. Perhaps Tatalino's intentions are noble. For all I know they might, though it strains credulity, have opened their London store under the aegis and with the blessings of AIC. I have no connection with either brand--perhaps someone more enlightened can provide further details, details that might of course exonerate Tatalino.
The lines are often blurred (sometimes deliberately) between plagiarism and its more benevolent brother, appreciative imitation. Do we, as relatively well-heeled shoppers, have a duty to support brands, even when more expensive, who have a genuine aesthetic vision, and who take creative risks in order to realise it (creative risks that are reflected in the final price of the garment or object)? I think we do. And it is not merely a question either of legality or of some simplified Friedmannian 'it's the nature of capitalism, deal with it'.

We have both an ethical duty (plagiarism is loathsome and quite lame) and, over a longer period, a self-serving aesthetic motivation (we should want brands such as Anglo Italian--- unique, creative, committed to higher standards of traditional manufacturing and customer service-- to survive and flourish and not, as far as I can judge, ones such as this-- derivative, mediocre, cost-cutting, opportunistic etc.)
I've met and had meals with Nathan and I don't think this is the case. The brand started in a different place aesthetically, with a smaller product lineup, and has evolved in time to what it is now. Nathan created the jacket and trouser silhouette and design based on his own Neapolitan bespoke commissions.
One other major difference: The fabrics he uses aren't all muddy, grayish, dour hues.
 

Satmoche

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Aug 4, 2014
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I hadn't heard of this brand until, like Eurydice stepping on a snake, I stumbled upon it here in this forum. After perusing its website, social media and other promotional literature, I am staggered that nobody on this thread has mentioned the obvious and rather suspect similarities between this brand and Anglo Italian. But similarities would really be too neutral a term. Styling, cloth choices, design elements, typefaces, even tote bags--all seem to have been plagiarized by the former from the latter. One of the owners and models even sports curly ginger locks. Is there a malign force at work here? Is it I-smell-a-Rat-alino's plan to undercut the prices of Anglo Italian by using cheaper suppliers (from Portugal etc) and inferior manufacturing (half-canvas construction etc)? We all accept that fashion is largely based on appropriation and homage. Sometimes we even accept direct copying especially when the company being copied is a corporate behemoth inflating its prices with unjustifiable speed and relish in order to remain exclusive. Evidently Anglo Italian is not one of these brands. If I were connected with them, I would be spitting feathers and throwing punches. Their staff and owner are some of the friendliest people in an unfriendly industry. They must have worked hard to establish an elegant identity and distinctive style.They must have worked even harder to cultivate an appreciation for that style in a customer base large enough to keep their business afloat.

Perhaps I'm mistaken. Perhaps Tatalino's intentions are noble. For all I know they might, though it strains credulity, have opened their London store under the aegis and with the blessings of AIC. I have no connection with either brand--perhaps someone more enlightened can provide further details, details that might of course exonerate Tatalino.
The lines are often blurred (sometimes deliberately) between plagiarism and its more benevolent brother, appreciative imitation. Do we, as relatively well-heeled shoppers, have a duty to support brands, even when more expensive, who have a genuine aesthetic vision, and who take creative risks in order to realise it (creative risks that are reflected in the final price of the garment or object)? I think we do. And it is not merely a question either of legality or of some simplified Friedmannian 'it's the nature of capitalism, deal with it'.

We have both an ethical duty (plagiarism is loathsome and quite lame) and, over a longer period, a self-serving aesthetic motivation (we should want brands such as Anglo Italian--- unique, creative, committed to higher standards of traditional manufacturing and customer service-- to survive and flourish and not, as far as I can judge, ones such as this-- derivative, mediocre, cost-cutting, opportunistic etc.)
I am not quite sure whether the tenor of your post was adequate for your claim when you have evidently not researched the brand that you so vehemently besmirch. Have you visited their shop and try their clothes?

People find inspiration from other brands, A.I. loves the Italian suits and they are very transparent about it, hence the name. It would not come to our minds to slate them and insisting that Italian tailors must be protected.
 

sargeinaz

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You sure you don’t have any ties to AI? You sound like someone at Natalino personally did something to you. You even joined this forum a day ago and this was your very first post lol.

Natalino IMO has a nicer jacket and trouser cut. Is less slim than AI. Has nicer jeans. Uses more colors. Their shirt fits me better too. I think Natalino is priced very fair and I have no issue buying things from them at full price.

AI so far has nicer overall fabrics/patterns, I love how they use colors in a subtle way, better construction for their jackets (at natalinos price point, I’ll gladly take half canvas) and sits at a much higher price point. Also, I find Natalino slightly more consistent sizing wise. Every AI item I have ever bought has been very off from the size chart to the point I just sold them because it wasn’t worth the money to return them. They were always far smaller than the size chart said to the point where I won’t buy something from them without seeing it first.

I like both brands, there’s def things I like more that AI does, but overall I prefer Natalino. Especially at the price point. And every time they tweak their clothes, to me it’s an improvement.
 
Last edited:

dizzydee

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I concur with this on the trousers. I can wear Natalino, but not the old SM. I intend on trying the new SM High-Rise cut to compare (the back rise and seat are supposed to be improved).

My only issue with the Natalino trousers is that they're inconsistent across fabrics and colors. Last season I bought the Tropical Wool and the Linen. The linen fits a full size larger in every way (and it stretches out with wear). Natalino does allude to this in the description however.

But even the Tropical Wool is slimmer in one color opposed to the other. This is not an issue exclusive to Natalino by any means -- Spier and Anglo-Italian have the same problem, and I'm sure many other manufacturers do as well.

Just be aware of variations and if you're on the border of sizes, try two.
I purchased flannel trousers from both brands in F/W 23, size 30. The SM pair (contemporary fit) has slightly more room in the thighs and is less tapered. Both are good and highly wearable, though I appreciate the extra room in the SM. I don't have the SM old cut so can't compare.
 

taxgenius

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Did the mock leno sports coat increase in price a lot? It seems that way but perhaps I am misremembering.
 

gonnagetmine

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Sep 10, 2009
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I purchased flannel trousers from both brands in F/W 23, size 30. The SM pair (contemporary fit) has slightly more room in the thighs and is less tapered. Both are good and highly wearable, though I appreciate the extra room in the SM. I don't have the SM old cut so can't compare.
I just received a pair of the new SM cream cotton trousers and can also confirm they are significantly roomier than the old SM in the seat, crotch, thigh. And larger than Natalino, less taper.
 

sydneycider

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Joined
Mar 22, 2022
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I hadn't heard of this brand until, like Eurydice stepping on a snake, I stumbled upon it here in this forum. After perusing its website, social media and other promotional literature, I am staggered that nobody on this thread has mentioned the obvious and rather suspect similarities between this brand and Anglo Italian. But similarities would really be too neutral a term. Styling, cloth choices, design elements, typefaces, even tote bags--all seem to have been plagiarized by the former from the latter. One of the owners and models even sports curly ginger locks. Is there a malign force at work here? Is it I-smell-a-Rat-alino's plan to undercut the prices of Anglo Italian by using cheaper suppliers (from Portugal etc) and inferior manufacturing (half-canvas construction etc)? We all accept that fashion is largely based on appropriation and homage. Sometimes we even accept direct copying especially when the company being copied is a corporate behemoth inflating its prices with unjustifiable speed and relish in order to remain exclusive. Evidently Anglo Italian is not one of these brands. If I were connected with them, I would be spitting feathers and throwing punches. Their staff and owner are some of the friendliest people in an unfriendly industry. They must have worked hard to establish an elegant identity and distinctive style.They must have worked even harder to cultivate an appreciation for that style in a customer base large enough to keep their business afloat.

Perhaps I'm mistaken. Perhaps Tatalino's intentions are noble. For all I know they might, though it strains credulity, have opened their London store under the aegis and with the blessings of AIC. I have no connection with either brand--perhaps someone more enlightened can provide further details, details that might of course exonerate Tatalino.
The lines are often blurred (sometimes deliberately) between plagiarism and its more benevolent brother, appreciative imitation. Do we, as relatively well-heeled shoppers, have a duty to support brands, even when more expensive, who have a genuine aesthetic vision, and who take creative risks in order to realise it (creative risks that are reflected in the final price of the garment or object)? I think we do. And it is not merely a question either of legality or of some simplified Friedmannian 'it's the nature of capitalism, deal with it'.

We have both an ethical duty (plagiarism is loathsome and quite lame) and, over a longer period, a self-serving aesthetic motivation (we should want brands such as Anglo Italian--- unique, creative, committed to higher standards of traditional manufacturing and customer service-- to survive and flourish and not, as far as I can judge, ones such as this-- derivative, mediocre, cost-cutting, opportunistic etc.)
FWIW I also think Anglo Italian is fantastic, but suggesting Natalino is a rip-off is so stupid.

Anglo Italian was not the first in the new wave of neapolitan-inspired classic menswear and they don't hold a monopoly on that look. Are The Armoury, Drake's, Berg & Berg, Cavour, etc also rip offs? Obviously not.

Anglo Italian is primarily an MTM service with a clearly defined look in terms of silhouette and colour, Natalino is closer to Drake's if anything with their bolder colours and more expressive pieces.
 

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