• STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

The Japanese Repro Clothing Thread (Real McCoys, Freewheelers, Etc.)

Mghart

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2014
Messages
1,219
Reaction score
954
Well since theres a dedicated Toyo-brand thread, this could be for non-Toyo brands (or maybe stuff Self Edge doesn't stock as they have their dedicated thread) as theres quite a number of other Japanese repro brands out there even outside of various denim brands the specifically do vintage era denim.

The Real McCoys is probably the most well known outside of Japan and there's been other brands (Freewheelers and Toys McCoys specifically) that came out of RMC. The brand has many sub-labels (this seems to be quite common with a lot of these brands) Joe McCoy, Double Diamond, Main line,etc. focusing on specific areas of military, sportswear, workwear. I won't go on about quality as its generally quite high across the board, more specifically its probably better made than the originals were.

Going into a McCoys store in Japan is akin to the RRL store (I've only been to West Broadway in NYC) in the design and layout where its quite a sight to see in person. Tokyo store specifically is amazing (although theres locations across Japan)

Generally speaking, RMC is much better priced in Japan or via proxy as RMC London or other western retailers are priced rather high as expected. This could be said about just about any Japanese brand obviously, but you cannot buy direct from RMC Japan like you can from other brand retailers say Freewheelers for example.

Theres too many other brands to dive deep into, maybe that could be another post as I used to collect Freewheelers for years but now just RMC and another brand.

I suppose share pics, sizing advice,etc heh. When I have a chance I'll try and take some pics of some of the RMC stuff I still have since I've sold off some things recently.

Sign outside the Tokyo store in Shibuya (Most shops in Japan don't allow photography inside)
IMG_0157.jpeg

Freewheelers Desolation Row in Shibuya
IMG_0201.jpeg
 

whorishconsumer

King Douche
Joined
Aug 12, 2010
Messages
3,304
Reaction score
4,034
Nice! You should have tagged me in starting this!

I've just gotten into Japanese repro of late and The Real McCoy's in particular. What I can impart I mainly have picked up elsewhere on the Internet and, as such, is subject to some verification. But here goes:


Intro

The Real McCoy's family of brands takes as it's MO to render classic American military, western, motorcycle, sports and workwear design true to original details, but in luxe materials and a "modern" fit. In this they are distinguished by repro enthusiasts from the likes of Buzz Rickson (Toyo), who are known for being committed to accurate replication of design, materials and fit. As such, RMC products tend to be "nicer" than other repros, if not also more expensive. Below is a brief interview with Hitoshi Tsujimoto, who just recently stepped down from the helm at RMC. I'm not going to pretend to fully understand the message here.




History

The Real McCoy's was founded in Japan in or by the early 90s by Hiroshi Okamoto and some other unnamed individuals. In the early days the brand provided a select mail-order service for high-end repros of A2 leather flight jackets. For a period they were in partnership with and produced motorcycle jackets for Harley Davidson. The company came into financial dire straits – to the tune of 1.13 billion yen – and it is rumored that fraudulent behavior or evasion may have been at play. Okamoto's reported acquisition of a private B-17 bomber is thought to have contributed to their sinking bottom line. In certain telling, The Real McCoy's became entangled with the yakuza to address their debts. What is more widely acknowledged is that Tsujimoto – a long-time importer and distributor of Americana to the Amerikamura market under his NYLON company – brought RMC out of bankruptcy in 2001.

There followed a shake-up within the RMC partnership, with several individuals involved splitting off to form their own brands doing similar stuff. Okamoto started Toys McCoy, focusing on much the same militaria but with an emphasis on WWII-era prints and badges (he is an illustrator, after all). Atsushi Yasui, who had headed the Joe McCoy sub-brand (started in 1997) while at RMC left to form Freewheelers. Masahide Ishizuka helmed the New Zealand production facility where much (if not all) of RMC's B3 and B6 bombers were made. Upon separation, this became it's own brand, dubbed Real McCoy's New Zealand within the country and The Few in Japan and elsewhere (due to licensing agreements). RMCNZ/The Few shut down in 2015. Rainbow Country is rumored to be yet another offshoot of RMC, although this is unconfirmed.

In more recent history, RMC acquired almost sole rights to produce and distribute Buco-brand products.

Today RMC is headquartered in Kobe, Japan.


Brands

The Real McCoy's - American militaria circa WWII (A2s, B3s, M65s)
Joe McCoy - Western, sports and workwear (jeans, sweats, leather jackets)
Double Diamond - Tailored workwear ??
Buco - Motorcycle wear (leather jackets)


Stockists

RMC has several brick and mortar outposts throughout Japan but a comparatively limited presence abroad (although better than most Japanese brands). As @Mghart has noted, prices are far more favorable domestically than abroad. That said, there are some distributors who are able to place orders with the company at relatively limited mark-up (Standard & Strange specifically).

The company maintains a Japanese site and UK site, both with separate catalogs. International orders can not be placed with RMC Japan directly but you can go through a local distributor or proxy service, who can place the order on your behalf. Prices with RMC UK are generally unfavorable.

It appears that RMC has not had much success finding a place to land stateside. Self Edge (SF/NYC) stocked them for a brief period in the early oughts. Blue In Green (NYC), in an agreement with RMC corporate, established an annex in 2014 that did not last more than a year before closing "due to high rent". At present Standard and Strange (Oakland, CA) and Lost & Found (Toronto) are the best-stocked providers I have found. The Armoury (NYC) has also begun stocking a small selection at their Upper East Side Westbury location.

Note that while John Chapman at Good Wear used to be a stateside distributor of RMC circa 2012, that is no longer the case (he told me as much).

While RMC was in partnership with Superdenim (UK), the latter are no longer a distributor. However, you may find used and deadstock RMC through Superdenim's MARRKT outlet. Note that I have found the prices for used garments to be equal to their retail. RMC has established an annex with The Clutch Cafe (London) while they renovate their London headquarters. Prices are similarly unkind.

Frans Boone (Belgium/Netherlands) is a good option for those located in Europe and not wishing to contend with UK conversion or import/export taxes. Stu-f (Dusseldorf) and Jinji (Paris) are other options.

RMC UK: https://therealmccoys.com/
RMC JP: https://www.realmccoys.co.jp/index.php
Standard & Strange (Oakland): https://standardandstrange.com/ - They can order anything available within the catalog with 1/2 deposit; no returns on specials orders
The Armoury (NYC): https://thearmoury.com/
Lost & Found (Toronto): https://shoplostfound.com/
Frans Boone (Belgium, Netherlands): https://www.fransboonestore.com/
End (UK): https://www.endclothing.com/
Clutch Cafe (London): https://clutch-cafe.com/
MARKKT (Online): https://www.marrkt.com/ - Used and deadstock RMC
Jinji (Paris): https://www.jinji.fr/
Stu-f (Dusseldorf): https://www.stuf-f.com//
Signet (Manila): https://thesignetstore.com/
Celluloid (Japan) - https://www.celluloid1984.com/ - You can place your order directly with them via their Overseas Shipping Service inquiry form, and if you have PayPal
Barn Stormer (Japan): https://www.barnstormer.jp/ - Order via proxy
Time After Time (Japan): https://www.time-after-time.jp/ - Order via proxy
Real Moon (Japan): http://www.realmoon.co.jp/ - Order via proxy

Finally, you can find a wealth of used RMC stock via Yahoo Auctions Japan, which you may navigate via Buyee (https://buyee.jp/yahoo/auction) or any similar proxy service.

You can find an official stockist list here.

References
Wikipedia Japan
Fedora Lounge
A Fine-Tooth Comb
Ironheart Forum
Random Blog
Esquire
 
Last edited:

peachfuzzmcgee

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
729
Reaction score
819
I was a at 2nd hand store just like an hour ago and saw a Joe McCoy sweat for 40 bucks. It's pretty cropped, I'm always unsure if I want to go that route since it's an easy path to being a repro denim bro. The store in Kyoto is also pretty sick. The leather scrap stuffed animals they have are also something I'm constantly wanting but don't know what to do with them.
 
Last edited:

Peter1

Distinguished Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2010
Messages
1,198
Reaction score
747
RMC used to be associated with Superdenim in the UK, and had a similar separate store to Big. I think RRPs were just too high.
 

Mghart

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2014
Messages
1,219
Reaction score
954
Thanks @whorishconsumer thats a much more concise post on the brand than what I could put together haha.

A lot of RMC backstory is hard to trace for accuracy, but the most interesting part to me was how both Toys McCoy and Freewheelers began from there as they’re both now very well established brands in their own right.

Since the world was closed last year and I couldn’t make it to Japan, I haven’t picked up anything new recently. Proxying right now is a bit of a hassle until EMS starts shipping to the US again as well.

My winter jacket the last three seasons has been their N1 which actually works quite well considering it’s not like a down jacket or anything

CC85FA3E-44FB-47BE-9A7D-089C27152052.jpeg

For the price this is has been a solid pick up. I think it’s only bested by Freewheelers version as their use 100% alpaca for the linings instead of a 50/50 wool/alpaca like RMC, but it’s also a bit more expensive.

I’m hoping to pick up a B-10 next visit when I can get back to Japan or maybe a leather jacket which I’ve been putting off the last couple of years.
 
Last edited:

Clouseau

Inspector
Joined
May 18, 2013
Messages
4,818
Reaction score
7,046
Parisian store Jinji also stocks RMC

 

Lorcan7

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 5, 2012
Messages
1,199
Reaction score
6,733
Nice thread. I've been getting into Freewheelers lately. Have the Empire chesterfield coat, same melton wool as their peacoats so its pretty substantial. Probably going to get a few more things in due course.

SG100535-1.jpg
 

whorishconsumer

King Douche
Joined
Aug 12, 2010
Messages
3,304
Reaction score
4,034
RMC used to be associated with Superdenim in the UK, and had a similar separate store to Big. I think RRPs were just too high.
That's right! I forgot about MARRKT as well. I have updated the above accordingly.

Parisian store Jinji also stocks RMC

Thanks! Added above.

Thanks @whorishconsumer thats a much more concise post on the brand than what I could put together haha.

A lot of RMC backstory is hard to trace for accuracy, but the most interesting part to me was how both Toys McCoy and Freewheelers began from there as their both now very well established brands in their own right.

Since the world was closed last year and I couldn’t make it to Japan, I haven’t picked up anything new recently. Proxying right now is a bit of a hassle until EMS starts shipping to the US again as well.

My winter jacket the last three seasons has been their N1 which actually works quite well considering it’s not like a down jacket or anything

View attachment 1558951

For the price this is has been a solid pick up. I think it’s only bested by Freewheelers version as their use 100% alpaca for the linings instead of a 50/50 wool/alpaca like RMC, but it’s also a bit more expensive.

I’m hoping to pick up a B-10 next visit when I can get back to Japan or maybe a leather jacket which I’ve been putting off the last couple of years.
I recently picked up the N-1 SPL in Navy from Standard & Strange. Unfortunately the sizing is off on that particular iteration, with a size 40 having the body of a 42 or 44 but the arms of a 40, so I returned. I was tempted to go with the B10 or this limited-run variety that is a cross between the B10 and the N-1 SPL but ultimately passed.

1613834304933.png


I will be stopping by The Armoury Westbury today and will try on the N-1 SPL in a size 42 just to be sure...

I was a at 2nd hand store just like an hour ago and saw a Joe McCoy sweat for 40 bucks. It's pretty cropped, I'm always unsure if I want to go that route since it's an easy path to being a repro denim bro. The store in Kyoto is also pretty sick. The leather scrap stuffed animals they have are also something I'm constantly wanting but don't know what to do with them.
Embrace it, bro.
 

Mghart

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2014
Messages
1,219
Reaction score
954
@whorishconsumer To my knowledge the Navy N-1 is slimmer than the original khaki. Mine is a 42 and even though it’s a boxier fit through the body at the time a size 40 was too small when trying them on.

I’ve found I sometimes have to go up one or two sizes with RMC depending on what the item is which makes trying on or buying in person almost a must despite measurements.
 

Ed13

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2004
Messages
289
Reaction score
83
Late 2019 I decided to work only 3-4 days per week and went from CM to very casual. First purchases were a McCoy's grey loop wheel sweatshirt and a black ribbed short sleeve henley from Lost and Found. Love the cropped length of the sweatshirt and preferred both items in a snug fit. I am 6'2" 210lbs with a 44" chest and 34" waist and purchased both in a large. Baggy oversized fits are not my thing.

Have the 30's leather sports jacket in Nelson black as well as the Buco - J24. Interested in the Buco J-100 in brown.

Also interested in the Wool Pile Western Jacket as well as the western moleskin and maroon burgundy shirts. Always prefer to try clothing on so will have to wait.
 

whorishconsumer

King Douche
Joined
Aug 12, 2010
Messages
3,304
Reaction score
4,034
I'm not versed enough to say what the brand's "staple" offerings are, but I think the A2 has got to be up there, as it is what the company was founded on. RMC have done this jacket in a couple different models ("contracts", as they are emulating WWII models that were issued by various military contractors). At present they offer the MJI8101 and the MJ19001.

The MJ18101 is an A2 done to their own spec and not emulating any historical contract. The fit is considered trim for A2s (especially in the opinion of middle-aged American and British A2 enthusiasts). The Seal Brown on this model is the darkest brown I have seen offered for any A2 and I believe their dyeing is somewhat proprietary. It is what separated this model from any others for me when purchasing. I will however note that the brown is not as dark in person as in the photos.

1613835040190.png


The MJ19001 is based on a contract by Rough Wear - the 23380 - and has a looser body but shorter length than the MJ18101. It also comes in a lighter hue of brown.

1613835539854.png


I am new to the world of A2s (it goes deep). From what I have read, RMC is considered to provide some of the finest iterations of this jacket, with their usage of Shinki horsehide, their dyeing methods and the quality of their knits and hardware being highlighted. As an owner of the MJ1801 – my first of it's kind – I am stricken by the density of the horsehide as well as the quality of the knit. And, of course, the color.

If you wish to go down a rabbit hole with A2s, I suggest browsing Vintage Leather Jacket Forum or The Fedora Lounge, where you will find a wealth of knowledge on the history of this jacket. John Chapman of Good Wear is a well-respected historian and reproducer and you will find on his website a breakdown of many of the A2 contracts (https://www.goodwearleather.com/). His own product is coveted perhaps above RMC's, with an 18-24 month waiting list.
 
Last edited:

whorishconsumer

King Douche
Joined
Aug 12, 2010
Messages
3,304
Reaction score
4,034
@whorishconsumer To my knowledge the Navy N-1 is slimmer than the original khaki. Mine is a 42 and even though it’s a boxier fit through the body at the time a size 40 was too small when trying them on.

I’ve found I sometimes have to go up one or two sizes with RMC depending on what the item is which makes trying on or buying in person almost a must despite measurements.
The latest N-1 SPL ("special") went against previous sizing for the navy versions. But I have read – and measurements appear to confirm – what you have noted about the "regular" N-1 in navy and khaki.
 

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

Favorite Shorts Length

  • Above the knee

  • Knee length

  • Below the knee

  • None of the above

  • Mid-thigh ("short shorts")


Results are only viewable after voting.

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
461,531
Messages
10,014,729
Members
208,334
Latest member
MarilyRyan
Top