The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. random-adam

    random-adam Senior member

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    Our "driveway" is a pad barely large enough for one car, installed piecemeal in the '70s by a guy who didn't know what he was doing. It's probably looked like ass since before I was born. Fortunately our county just implemented a bunch of incentives (on a per-square-foot basis) both to remove impervious surfaces and to install pavers or permeable concrete.

    Does anybody have any advice on what to look for from contractors for that sort of thing?
     


  2. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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    That sounds overly expensive for a generic driveway. I just had a bunch of concrete work done including a new driveway. I did not go with the lowest bid because there were some tricky parts to the job and I wanted it done by someone who would stand behind his work. In any case, his quote for standard driveway work (rip out old driveway, frame new driveway with rebar at 18", pour new 300psi concrete at 4" depth) was $5-6 per square foot. That would be $5500-6500 for your driveway unless you've got something else that complicates the job.
     


  3. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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    I don't know much about permeable concrete except that it's more $$ than regular concrete. I believe its permeability degrades over time as the pores clog with debris, too. For pavers, you can't understate the importance of a solid, compacted base underneath the pavers. They're generally inexpensive to repair unless the base is shot in which case it's $$$.
     


  4. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    Shot in the dark here: Can anyone recommend a source for good, cheap dressers? I'm looking for something long and low, like Ikea MALM, which is close to perfect, but Ikea drawers, with the masonite or cardboard drawer bottoms, just don't hold up well enough for me to want to go there again. Long-term I would like a nice piece of furniture, but given that a dresser in the bedroom is about item #100 on a 1000-item list, I don't want to spend much more than a couple hundred bucks if it will get me through to when I can do something nicer.

    Antique would be considered, but I've been looking and haven't found anything quite right - it seems to me that a more modern scandinavian look is what would work for me. I have sources for vintage scandinavian, but I find that stuff is often too small.
     


  5. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I think their reaction is quite common. Any seller has already started to count the money once you are in contract. To find out that they may need to pay for all or some of a major roof repair is a bit shocking. Give them a chance to get over it.

    Now that it has been disclosed, they would have to disclose the roof issues with any other buyer. So, they have an incentive to try and work something out with you.

    I would tell the seller that I was going to "get several roofers to bid on repairs or replacement". That will prepare them. Then you need to decide what, if any, you are willing to contribute to the roof repair/replacement.

    Assuming you move ahead, get all the roof work done before you move in. The work should have some sort of guarantee.

    Your home looks like a classic Seattle area 60's house. That would mean the roof is 50+ years old and well past it's normal 40 year life span. So a complete replacement isn't out of the question unless it was replaced more recently.

    I had a repaired roof before moving into my second home. It then leaked in high winds. But we had a guarantee on the roof as part of the sales agreement. That saved us because it needed additional work inside and out to repair. We got it fixed eventually and loved the house. Good luck with your negotiations.
     


  6. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    That's the price I was expecting. I'll just get some more bids.
     


  7. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    It could be a little different than the usual scenario though, PSG, given that IIRC RedLantern bought the house before it went on the market and without the realtors or the "normal channels" involved. Not saying there isn't a negotiation to be had, and I'm sure they'll be willing to do something, but this isn't quite the regular course of business.
     


  8. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    If laws are different in WA state maybe. But in most states the seller must disclose any issues. Now if RedLantern gave up that right, then it is what it is.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2013


  9. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    Laws don't really figure into this, unless RL wants to sue saying that issues weren't disclosed. All I'm saying is that RL bought this place before it went on the market and everyone thought they had a good deal, but if the deal has changed, the sellers might be more willing to go to market. They lose out in some ways, (e.g. they will have to pay for the listing if they haven't at this point) but if they hammered out a sweetheart deal knowing they weren't paying those listing fees, and maybe are willing to list it for higher, and who knows who's pulling the strings on a deal like this with a church being the selling entity.... I'm just saying it's not quite the normal negotiation is all. They may opt to walk away in search of a different contract.
     


  10. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    You're both echoing the competing thoughts in my head. We are still under the time period for the inspection contingency in our contract, so we're not "stuck" yet by any means. I am not totally surprised by the reaction, nobody wants to get bad news. Like I said, if the roof really is as bad as the inspector seemed to think, they are going to limit themselves to cash buyers if they really refuse to do anything about it, and frankly, this is not the type of neighborhood I would expect a lot of cash buyers to be looking.

    Thanks for all the advice and well-wishes, fellas. I'll keep you posted!
     


  11. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I've had a malm 4-drawer dresser and 2-drawer nightstand for years and they have held up quite well through several moves (just make sure everything's tight every once and a while).

    The cardboard drawer bottoms are terrible though. You can try and reinforce the backs (usually what happens is the back of the drawer bows out enough to let the drawer bottom out) which will hold them better, but eventually someone is going to try and stuff 5 shirts too many in the drawer and it will become a problem.

    If you replace the bottoms with actual masonite or a thin plywood, they are significantly sturdier. If you wanted to go overboard, I think you could run a strip of .5"x/5" down the back of the drawer and tack it to both the back of the drawer and the bottom (since it is always the back that pulls out).

    They are probably smaller than you want, but the IKEA Rast dressers are actually very sturdy...just they are more like nightstand size. They are entirely unfinished pine which is why they are so cheap ($35 a piece), but you can finish them however you want (and two of them hacked into a single side-by-side unit gets you long and low):
    Spoilered so people don't have to look upon the furniture of the unwashed masses.
    Obviously, some of these look like so much work that you might as well buy lumber and make a dresser...but that little $35 flat-pack of wood can turn into many different things.
    [​IMG]
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    I don't see why you couldn't hack this last one so that it didn't need two vertical boards in the middle...would clean up the lines
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2013


  12. otc

    otc Senior member

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    According to this: http://www.merrypad.com/2011/02/04/cheap-ikea-drawers-and-the-quick-fix/
    You can just use a strong glue when assembling the Malm drawers and the bottoms should stay in place. I'm always a proponent of using wood glue when assembling ikea furniture (anything that is doweled and doesn't need to come apart to get it through a doorway gets glued) since it leads to much more solid furniture.

    I don't see why the glue wouldn't work, although cutting some masonite or plywood AND glueing it in place would probably even better.
     


  13. zalb916

    zalb916 Senior member

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    If $400-$600 is in your range, CB2 has some stuff that has that relatively modern Scandinavian look.
     


  14. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    Ordinary wood glue would not be ideal for joining painted surfaces.
     


  15. otc

    otc Senior member

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    luckily the inside of the drawer cutouts are rough MDF which takes to gluing very well. The paperboard drawer bottoms aren't painted but there is some sort of finish on the top side. The bottom and edge are raw though and you could rough them up with some 120grit sandpaper before gluing.
     


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