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The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I want to buy a place so that I can have lefty say this.
     
  2. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    And you get the SF discount.

    It's a fine place and with a few little changes can be a more interesting place with.

    The worst offenders are the fanlights followed by the kitchen ceiling fixture: if you really need a fan put in a low low profile modern fan; if you need light get a lamp.

    Assuming there are no kids I would also consider removing the railings completely and just having a hole in the floor.

    lefty
     
  3. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    I noticed the crown molding, kitchen light, and fan lighting. The one I sort of disagree on is painting everything white as we only did this to sell our current house. Most people have horrible taste in art so I'd suggest a wall color before they pay too much for art that doesn't fit the rest of the house theme. An example being my fiance loves the look of the paintings she bought in Paris but they do not fit the more modern look of our current residence.

    But enjoy your house!
     
  4. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    You can have classical art in a modern home, just have to he considerate of it. I've seen museums do this by painting behind classical art in a burgundy or dark green. Barnes has a mix, all placed together and up on tan walls.

    I don't mind gilded frames on white walls, but some seem to take aversion to it.

    I'm with the all-white, I'd likely stain the floor to a darker brown and have the upstairs flooring replaced with wood.
    I hate red oak, but if it's already there then there is no sense in replacing it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2013
  5. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    Poor guy should never have posted his place.

    lefty
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I'm all for white too. I suppose I do have a light blue kitchen right now, but I would never consider anything besides a shade of white for the rest of the walls.

    Does anyone actually like fan-lights? they seem to be de rigueur in rentals (I at least have some ugly ceiling fixtures instead of the fans), the fans themselves seem to be useless and noisy, and the lights are usually ugly.
     
  7. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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    Well, the posted examples are the worst kind. There are fans with much lower-profile light kits. I'm not saying they look better than the same fan with no light at all, but there's a certain practicality that ceiling-mounted lights have over lamps. I have some fan-lights similar to the posted ones that I am looking to replace with something along the following lines:
    [​IMG]
     
  8. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I just feel like...if I had the fan lights, I would rip them out and replace them with regular lights.

    Unless I had super high ceilings or something and needed the air circulation (in which case I would probably want something more akin to the bigassfans stuff).
     
  9. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    If I had fan lights, I would go all 'do hit' on them.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2013
  10. upthewazzu

    upthewazzu Senior member

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    Really...only white?

    I left the walls in my house white for about a year after we moved in and it drove me nuts. Totally had an apartment feel to it. Started out by painting the downstairs a nice shade of brown and then added a little color to the upstairs rooms. All the colors are very Earthy, not showy or bright at all and really add to the house.
     
  11. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    I tackled my first plumbing repair/installation today!

    Our pre-sale inspection showed that the pressure at our house was too high so I knew we'd be needing a pressure regulator installed. We just got new appliances, so it's time to get that done so the pressure doesn't damage the appliances.

    I installed it right above the main shutoff inside the house so that's good.

    Steps:
    1.) turn off and drain water
    2.) hack saw a 1 inch section out of the run of galvanized to be replaced
    3.) use pipe wrench and channel lock pliers to unscrew old pipe
    4.) telfon tape the two ends of each of the new sections of galvanized to be installed
    5.) install the two new pipes, leaving approximately 5" gap between the two ends
    6.) install brass union ends on the end of each galvanized pipe
    7.) slide pressure regular into the gap with the included gasket on each side
    8.) tighten both union nuts
    9.) turn water back on

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  12. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I don't think you need to go quite as far as lefty says but I would suggest at a minimum:

     
  13. E TF

    E TF Senior member

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    Congrats!

    Were you holding your breath when you turned the water back on? I'm always expecting everything to burst apart in a huge watery mess when I do those kind of jobs. Its only actually happened once.
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    There's white and then there's white. This place would benefit from the latter.

    Currently the walls are painted a shitflesh colour. It's a small home without a lot of interesting architectural detail. Painting it white (after removing the offending lights, etc.) would essentially create a small perfect jewellry box that would better show off the furniture and/or lifestyle of the owner. Colour is great - I recently painted my foyer dark brown/grey with near-black baseboards - but you need to have a sense of why you want colour.

    Just noticed the DR light - probably toss that too.

    The poster hasn't responded yet, so I'm going to shut up until he says, "thanks, guys" or "fuck you, assholes.'

    lefty
     
  15. E TF

    E TF Senior member

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    I once spent a long weekend in a house that still had victorian gas lighting (no electricity at all in fact), and I was surprised at how white and "intense" the light was: fair bit whiter than incandescents. I imagine when the switch to electric light came along there was no end of complaining about how yellow everything was.
     
    1 person likes this.
  16. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    Rough service bulbs are, I believe, much dimmer than standard ones for any given wattage. And that LED doesn't look like a real bulb. It's probably made of plastic, and of course, there's a big white thing taking up the bottom half of the bulb. It'd stand out like a sore thumb in any fixture that displays the bulb.

    And although I agree about the brightness in most rooms most of the time, that's what dimmers are for.
     
  17. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    So true about shades of white.

    Ralph Lauren paint has a shade called "Studio" that opens up any room, is bright and clean but not as intense as your mamas washing machine. (AKA appliance white). The small rooms of this place would benefit from this shade of white.
     
  18. E TF

    E TF Senior member

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    Replacing the stair rail with glass would be a very sleek modern look, which would be great, but only if you got rid of the other olde-worlde features as well, such as the cornice (presume that's what a crown moulding is) and the georgian style 6 panel doors. Otherwise it seems to me you'd just have a random mix of modern and repro old.
     
  19. E TF

    E TF Senior member

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    True about rough service bulbs being dimmer, I was just noting them as an option. I have a couple with really old fashioned twisty elements that look pretty cool. If the bulb is on show you don't want anything too bright in there anyway.
    I did say "almost" about the LED. The glass bit is glass, not plastic, though the white bit is plastic of course. I have some of a similar model in pendant fittings with reeded glass globes over them. Unless you're really looking closely, they pass unnoticed.
     
  20. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    Not really expecting it to burst apart, but I'm periodically checking to see if there's seepage etc.

    Next up - connecting all the plumbing and drains for the kitchen I'm putting in downstairs, then probably a new water heater.
     
    1 person likes this.

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