The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    After getting various hardwood color samples and paint containers we are setting in on a very light beige for the walls. Just enough to contrast with the white trim. We took our current stock KM color, and had them cut it by 50%. It seems familiar yet different and lighter, brighter and clean. We compared that to several painted sections of various other white options. I highly recommend painting several large sections in various rooms before making color selections. It is funny how the same color on different walls can look quite different.

    Going with very dark brown floors. Anything else was just a middle of the road compromise that looked just so, so. The dark brown will look fantastic with our vintage Persian rugs, a zebra skin and a few jute mats.
     
  2. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    Just having a giggle. We have cedar plank siding on our house and there's enough rot (and no more sources for replacement boards) to warrant re-doing the entire house. Too bad we're going with hardiplank, it's so plain looking. That project begins a week from Monday.
     
  3. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Psg, I think the lighter paint for the walls was a good idea. It's much less limiting.
     
  4. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    I just can't get a break with these air conditioners. The other one quit today, neither fan nor compressor does anything at all. I unplugged the evaporator drain pipe Friday... a coincidence? It's not like I stepped on the lines or anything, but, damn, did I knock something loose and cause a (really bad) leak? I had to climb on top of the air handler to reach the drain; it's certainly possible. But then the coils didn't freeze up and there was no audible or visible leak, as far as I could see. No, there's not a float that's stuck.

    The contactor seemed to be stuck on, and it fell apart when I poked it, so I'm going to replace that and the capacitor before I call somebody out--even though both were newer parts and the contactor seemed to be delivering the right voltage before I broke it. The capacitor isn't bulged, though it was only delivering 120v from each terminal...is that normal when the a/c isn't actually running? I have no idea. Those are the two most common parts to fail on an a/c and only about $30 total, but I'll have to wait a couple days. No, I don't have a capacitance tester--they cost more than the capacitors.

    This irritates the hell out of me.
     
  5. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    That means you could have gone lower. Oh well. A decent deal.
     
  6. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    1/2 is a lot
     
  7. VLSI

    VLSI Senior member

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    Time to play a round of winged ant or termite... pretty sure the answer is termite. Fuck :(
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2013
  8. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    Termites. Walked into my basement once and said to my wife, "why are there winged bugs on the basement floor?" Poked a wall and bam - a swarm poured out. Previous owner nailed wood directly to the concrete wall which had developed a tiny crack. Mud tunnels all over the wall.

    Catch it early enough and it's a minor issue. Clean it all out and spray around the house. Do a yearly inspection and you're good.

    lefty
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2013
  9. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    How did everyone decide where to live before having kids? We want to make our next house a long-term house so we are weighing options for 20 years down the road unless some large, unforeseen life event happens. We are weighing suburb with newer houses, top school district in the state, a little further commute (20min to work) vs smaller older house in a trendier area with ok school districts, less of a commute, and more places within walking distance.

    Part of me thinks of the 1,800sq ft house I grew up in with 5 people was fine and the smaller 2,500sq ft older house should be enough, so what would I do with 3,500-4,000sq ft in the suburbs? But then I think of kids and their future so having great public schools and not having the extra cost for private schools.

    Any input would be helpful!
     
  10. jgold47

    jgold47 Senior member

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    if you cracked a feed line the pressure in the compressor may be too low to trip the pressure sensor.

    I see you already looked at the capacitor, but I would still replace it, they are super cheap and if you already opened it, I would try that first.
     
  11. otc

    otc Senior member

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    Far from it myself, but I would personally wait a bit. The kids don't need good schools until they are actually ~5 years old, so if you wait to move until a bit before that time, you will have a better idea of what your needs are and you will be making the school decisions at the right time--as opposed to moving now and finding out in 6 years that budget cuts and changing populations have left the great school near your house closed and your only options are the bad school just on the other side of the tracks or the good school that you have to drive your kids 20 minutes in the wrong direction to (making your 20 minute commute an hour).
     
  12. jgold47

    jgold47 Senior member

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    This is a tricky subject. On one hand you have certain needs and requirements today as no-kids that may change when you have kids. One school of thought is that you enjoy the fun smaller houses now, and then when the kids get older you move to the forever house. This is what my wife and I are planning. We live in an old home/cute downtown type situation but I would rather die than try to raise a kid in this house (how did people do it before!~!) , so we will be moving in the next year or two to hopefully a forever home.
     
  13. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    Either way now is still a good time to buy so make a choice. Interest rates will certainly be substantially higher several years for now so grab what you want this year.
     
  14. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    -I encourage less of a commute if possible. Not only for your time, but it gives you more time with your kids and their activities. Think of the time and money you spend commuting, the wear and tear on your car, etc. You can be the dad who comes to sporting events, basketball practice and school plays when you are close by.

    -Don't assume that private schools are great. The question is, "do you have excellent private school options?" If so, they can be an ideal way to boost your kids skills especially in the early years. Go for the best school option if possible.

    -The bigger the house the more expensive to do things over time -carpet, paint, heat, cooling, landscaping. You should decide if you will have enough disposable income to pay people to care for your home. If so, go as large as you want. If not, then do you really want to spend a lot of time every weekend in the garden, or around the house? If not, go smaller and plan for efficiency so that you are free to play. It comes down to finances and what you want to do with your time.

    -Children by the middle of their Elementary school years are highly motivated by their peers. I would seek a setting where they would be around the most motivated kids and opportunities. That usually means higher priced homes but also more appreciation and easier to sell.
     
  15. VLSI

    VLSI Senior member

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    I way over bought in terms of need. Dont really regret it, but it is a bit overwhelming for now. I did give up a short commute for a hugger place... well it's only like 15min, but could have been 5.
     

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