Dismiss Notice

STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

Tags:
  1. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

    Messages:
    27,426
    Likes Received:
    7,614
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Location:
    NE PA
    

    Agreed. I have a whole room devoted to my hiking/camping equipment.
     


  2. M. Bardamu

    M. Bardamu Senior member

    Messages:
    1,468
    Likes Received:
    96
    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Location:
    The Beef 'n' Booze
    



    Laundry on the sleeping floor (top floor) is great, until one of the hoses bursts...good luck getting your washer/dryer out of the way and shutting the valve off before extensive flooding and water damage occurs. That's provided you are home when the hose bursts, and not in Australia for a few weeks...

    Something like an Intelliflow shutoff is a must, as is a drainable catch basin under the washing machine.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013


  3. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

    Messages:
    50,669
    Likes Received:
    13,812
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    All this talk reminds me why I'm happy to have only one floor. Also happy I have a huge utility room with sink and a folding counter and closet hanging bar in there.
     


  4. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

    Messages:
    14,658
    Likes Received:
    2,291
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Purseforum
    We converted a "summer kitchen" room in our old house to a 2nd floor laundry and it was fucking heaven. No, you couldn't run the dryer at night, but laundry was so easy.

    In our new house we have the laundry in the basement, and the basement stairs are steep and narrow, and taking laundry up and down is a giant, giant PITA. It is nice to have room to spread out, but even today I occasionally consider if we could sneak in a stacking or combo unit somewhere upstairs near the bedroom at least to do things like socks, tshirts, and underwear just to cut down on the lugging of huge baskets up and down an awkward stair.
     


  5. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

    Messages:
    50,669
    Likes Received:
    13,812
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    The main way to make laundry easier is to send most of your trousers and shirts out for cleaning (which is what we do).
     


  6. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

    Messages:
    11,667
    Likes Received:
    1,755
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Most full-size (front-load) washers and dryers can be stacked. There's no reason not to do it if you can. It frees up space and the extra weight helps to reduce noise from the washer.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013


  7. otc

    otc Senior member

    Messages:
    14,989
    Likes Received:
    4,585
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2008
    

    No basement? You don't live in one of those anti-basement states do you?


    No point in running the dryer at night anyway...everything will just come out wrinkled from sitting right?
    Sound like you need a laundry dumbwaiter.


    Only problem is that I don't trust commercial laundry with my shirts. I'd send them my socks, underwear, and t-shirts, but that just seems silly.

    I rarely wash my pants (and obviously, the wool stuff has to be dry cleaned) so the pants thing isn't really an issue.
     


  8. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

    Messages:
    16,327
    Likes Received:
    1,052
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    


    Good point, though have you seen how large washers and dryers have gotten lately? Some of them look like semi trucks. I know its partly the bottom shelves, but still.


    [​IMG]
     


  9. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

    Messages:
    5,625
    Likes Received:
    1,171
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    That's largely due to the bottom shelves, which come separately and are removable.
     


  10. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

    Messages:
    11,667
    Likes Received:
    1,755
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    They posed that picture with a little tiny woman and a low ceiling to make their products look bigger. I bet you she's under five feet tall.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013


  11. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

    Messages:
    11,667
    Likes Received:
    1,755
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Oh, yeah, and the machines are sitting on a raised platform. She's wearing high heels and the floor of the platform is over her ankles.

    I googled it, though, and apparently that's a special "gigantic" washing machine for the Korean market. As I understand it most Koreans don't even have washing machines, so I guess it's giant to them.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013


  12. MrG

    MrG Senior member

    Messages:
    12,191
    Likes Received:
    4,345
    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Location:
    The Medicine Spring
    I thought about starting a thread for this, but I figured I'd ask here first, given it's a thriving thread and I'm sort of on topic.

    As some of you know, I'll be relocating soon. We own our house, and I don't think we have enough equity to sell right now without walking away empty-handed. That being the case, we're going to be landlords for the foreseeable future. I have zero experience on the landlord side of renting, so I'd be interested in advice from those of you who own rental properties.

    For context, it's a single-family home in a neighborhood where I know there are some rental houses that have been occupied as long as I've lived there. I also live in a college town where people come and go, so there's likely a market. Also, I'll be living about 1.5 hours from the house, so I don't really have the ability to drop in whenever I might want/need to do so.

    My first question is regarding property management companies. I'm strongly leaning toward one, but does anyone have advice either way?

    Secondly, I'm open to any advice people might have on making being a landlord as painless as possible.
     


  13. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

    Messages:
    16,327
    Likes Received:
    1,052
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    


    Being a landlord is a PITA, but its paying for your house. Renters will bother you with everything because its not their house, they won't fix anything and expect quick turnaround. They'll also abuse your appliances, so don't expect them to last as long.

    Don't pay any utilities except trash. Include yard maintenance... most renters do a shit job.

    Specifically disalow home modifications w/o your approval in a lease.

    Collect 2 mos rent in a deposit. Its not the money, its a signal they have enough disposable income which is a sign they are stable. Nothing worse than an eviction process where you're saddled with 2 mortgages.

    Dont rent to under 30's, nor a group home. Look for a family w kids or better yet a married couple. No roomates/BF+GF, they split and want to move out, breaking leases is a PITA. A 2 year lease is also a sign of stability, its a good exchange for not raising rent, even incentivise a 1 year extension within the 1st year w/ no rent raise.

    Avoid pets if you can.

    Definitely do a credit check. Dont be afraid to check in with neighbors.

    I would not use a service, personally. Its expensive. You can do it all yourself, but if you are uber busy it might make sense. If you do it yourself, use a lease that's state specific.
     


  14. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

    Messages:
    11,667
    Likes Received:
    1,755
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    I used to help my folks manage some rental properties they had. I wouldn't recommend renting a house you plan to sell soon unless the house is in poor condition already. Your experience may differ, of course, but tenants (especially college kids) cause a lot of wear and tear. If you have to repair damage to sell the house, it's going to cost you a lot more than you'd make renting it for a short period of time. And you have to be extremely selective about who you rent to, and I wonder whether a management company is going to do that for you.

    Oh, yes, don't forget that you won't be able to claim the homestead exemption on the house anymore, and when you sell it the buyer will expect you to make up the difference in taxes for the whole year. At least that's how it works in my state.

    My recommendation would be to sell the house and cut your losses.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2013


  15. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

    Messages:
    14,658
    Likes Received:
    2,291
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Purseforum
    Renting is tricky business. No great advice here, but good luck to you, G.

    So this is going to sound pretty sad, but if you understand how totally not handy I am, you will understand why I am pretty proud of the sawhorses I made last night.

    Or, as I have been delighting in calling them, in Baltimore shirtsleeves solidarity, my sawlhorses.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by