The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Edsal17

    Edsal17 Well-Known Member

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    Anyone have any experience with crawl space dehumidifiers? I have a 2400 square foot crawl space, and I already have a 6mil vinyl vapor barrier down, but I think I could still use a dehumidifier. Recommendations?
     


  2. otc

    otc Senior member

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    Unless you have ceramic tile in the basement, that might be hard.

    IIRC, the reason that it is so easy to install electric floor heating in a bathroom is because you just have to lay down tile which isn't so hard if you are using 12x12 tiles or something. The room is small so you don't need a very big mat under it.

    In a basement in MN, you're probably talking concrete slab (and maybe you have carpet or asbestos tile on top of that). For something like that you'd want radiant tubes in the slab which is a completely different level of complexity.
     


  3. mike1445

    mike1445 Senior member

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    we have good hardwood worth saving in half of the downstairs but will be putting down tile in the foyer through to the kitchen as the floors werent in such good shape. have thought about radiant floor heat...really like the idea but it would be quite a bit of square footage to install...
     


  4. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    So I'm doomed to a cold basement floor in the winter? =(
     


  5. otc

    otc Senior member

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    There is such a thing as a warm basement floor in the winter?
     


  6. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    A man can dream.
     


  7. imschatz

    imschatz Senior member

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    Lots of people do heated floors in their basements here in the Arctic. My cousins had a separate water heater specifically to heat their basement floor in the winter (and their washer/dishwasher).
     


  8. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    On behalf of everyone from New Orleans, I'd like to ask--what is a basement?

    Edit: [And yes I know people in New Orleans often have a first floor they call a "basement"]
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013


  9. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    Its something you can have when you don't build a city under sea level. :D
     


  10. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I can't imagine a house without a basement.

    If I lived in one of those traditionally non-basement places, I feel like I would still try and build one (obviously not in somewhere like new orleans, but probably in Tuscon)
     


  11. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    As someone from Charleston, I was wondering the same thing... :D

    It was interesting watching New York respond to the hurricanes over the last couple of years. People were in the grocery store panic-buying frozen foods. I mean, really, your power is going to be the first thing to go out, what are you going to do with 10 lbs of frozen chicken breasts? I wanted to stand on a cart or something and tell people how this was going to go down.

    More seriously though, it's interesting to see the differences in architecture. For instance, there is basically nothing keeping a storm tide from flooding the subways, as the MTA found out much to their chagrin. And people live in basements here, so when it flooded, it caused a lot of damage. In Charleston, everything is built on stilts so the water comes in, the water goes back out, and everyone just goes about their lives.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013


  12. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    My house doesn't have a basement and I regret it. Love my house otherwise, but basements do come in handy. Unless they take in water. In that case they are a total nightmare.
     


  13. random-adam

    random-adam Senior member

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    Our 1921 cape has a basement which, by virtue of its 6'3" ceiling and my 6'2" height, will remain unfinished as long as we're living there. It's marvelous for storage, the washer/dryer, and accessible HVAC, ductwork, and plumbing; it's somewhat less so when I forgot to clear a gutter before a heavy rainstorm in September 2011...

    [​IMG]

    I am wicked grateful for whichever previous owner put in that french drain and sump pump.
     


  14. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I would keep it unfinished, at least for the most part (could have a sort of finished room like how my parents had a sort of play room with a large rug and only furniture and things that aren't going to care if they get a bit wet).

    But it's the perfect place for laundry (with the luxury of a huge laundry-room sink), for a workshop, to hide the furnace where its noise won't be noticed, to put the cat litter and a beer fridge, and for storing out of season athletic equipment.

    Whenever I see articles about people going minimalist and not needing any storage space because they only have 50 posessions, I figure that they must not have any hobbies that I would like. Pretty hard to have more than a passing interest in sports like cycling/skiing/sailing/ or even tennis without having places to store equipment out of season. Hard to own enough tools to fix your vehicle or build/repair some furniture if you go minimal.
     


  15. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    We did similar when Ike hit a few years back, we spent the evening prior doing a lot of cooking for the upcoming week, and then the week after we used our grill. Got us through two weeks no problem.

    As an aside, I'm fixin to sell our rent house to the current renters, we're both in awkward positions re: negotiating. Not liking this, but at least I've found my walk-away number.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013


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