1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

    Messages:
    11,080
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    [​IMG]

    Looking at this picture, I think I need to explain it, because it isn't a very good illustration of what the wood looks like.

    The board on the left looks like it's rift sawn.

    The board in the middle is "figured," but it isn't because of the vertical grain lines that meet in a "cathedral" pattern. That's a typical plain sawn board. The figure is actually the rather subtle shadows that are running roughly perpendicular to the grain. This is caused by stress or compression of the tree and results in ripples or waves in the growth of the wood. In some woods (not oak) it reflects light in a certain way that gives it a three-dimensional appearance, like a chatoyant rock.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2017
    1 person likes this.
  2. Big Pun

    Big Pun Senior member

    Messages:
    5,970
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2008
    Location:
    امریکا
    I was going to post my friend's family's house as another MN home to buy in that price range but then I realized it's actually worth way more. I'm really sad they sold it a few years ago. Probably the nicest house I'll ever step foot in. house
     
  3. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,590
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    That oak is a beauty! That will make wonderful stair treads. It's straight enough that you could split it into quarters then bandsaw those into boards but they probably will not be wide enough at that point for single slab treads.
     
  4. esoxm

    esoxm Senior member

    Messages:
    185
    Joined:
    May 18, 2011
    

    I've always loved that house, used to drive past it every day. That estimate seems pretty low, I remember it being on the market for $8.x something, looks like it sold for $5.2m in 2014.
     
  5. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

    Messages:
    11,080
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    

    The mill's capacity is either 27 or 29" -- can't remember off the top of my head. If it's 29", that's not a big deal. Just shave a little off with the chainsaw on either side. I'd be less happy if it's 27," but it's the same deal. I could actually probably get all my stair treads from single boards (other than the landings) but I'm not too worried about it. With short logs you have to expect to cut the wide boards up unfortunately as they rarely dry straight and crack free enough.

    I have a chainsaw mill (that I've been meaning to get around to using...), but the longest bar I have is 32". Not going to cut it (literally), but I guess it could be used to trim the log and save a little wood. At this point I don't care, though.

    I figure I could get about 150 bd ft or so per log. 750 bd ft from the five I cut would actually be a pretty good haul. And that's not counting about 3' (usable) at the stump and 3-4' at the crotch. I didn't mention it before but there's some metal in the stump and a bit of blue stain in the log directly above it. Not a big deal but maybe cuts out of the yield.
     
  6. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,590
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    I would not be able to resist riving at least one of those. That would make great stair treads, IMO, you get the best grain orientation and they'll be without runout (no splinters). It's typically a very fast process, likely faster than sawing but obviously not commonly done for it as it usually only works best on short sections that can be reasonably assured to be straight.
     
  7. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

    Messages:
    9,601
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Location:
    The Old North State
    Look forward to seeing the results of the stairs, Turk.

    I know we had a big discussion about windows recently, but are there any options other than Pella and Anderson in the mid-range space? I'm looking at probably Pella 750s. I don't really want to replace the windows because there probably isn't a lot of return in doing it. The existing windows are wood, but they're the cheapest double pane wood windows money can buy, and putting the screens in today I noticed a few of the frames have started to warp or crack.

    Any recommendations on entry doors? I'm planning to do fiberglass - had good success with the fiberglass with the last house.
     
  8. jcman311

    jcman311 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,410
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2015
    Location:
    Big Whisky
    I have no idea of price, but I know Marvin windows are at my in laws house. A quick search shows better or equal to Pella and Anderson. Do you not prefer MN made windows?
     
  9. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

    Messages:
    9,601
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Location:
    The Old North State
    

    I don't care where they are made. I'm looking to maximize the cost-benefit ratio. I had Pella 450s in the MN house. They were solid enough windows, but the built in shades has my interest because we need all new shades anyway.
     
  10. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

    Messages:
    9,601
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Location:
    The Old North State
    Also, searching Marvin windows led me to "Old House Guy" which has pages dedicated to how crappy windows are today.
     
  11. lordsuperb

    lordsuperb Senior member

    Messages:
    2,393
    Joined:
    May 30, 2009
    

    how so
     
  12. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

    Messages:
    9,601
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Location:
    The Old North State
  13. jcman311

    jcman311 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,410
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2015
    Location:
    Big Whisky
     
  14. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

    Messages:
    50,225
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    Man, just enjoyed the hell out of the backyard living this weekend. Might end the night with a drink out at the firepit before bed tonight.
     
    5 people like this.
  15. emptym

    emptym Senior member Moderator

    Messages:
    7,321
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2007
    We ended up replacing our windows with wooden, double hung ones like the originals but double pane and with tilt pac. I wanted to have them refurbished (hate waste, love wavy glass), but they had been neglected for so long that a couple restoration companies said it wouldn't be worth it. Lead paint too. The replacements were made by an over 100 yr old family business that probably made the orignals.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2017
  16. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

    Messages:
    9,601
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Location:
    The Old North State
    

    I don't blame you. I also don't have a historic home, so I'm not concerned about historic accuracy.
     
  17. FlyingMonkey

    FlyingMonkey Senior member

    Messages:
    3,580
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Location:
    Ontario
    That guy is right about historic windows and how to treat them / supplement them. But he does seem to pick his figures for U-values to suit his argument rather than looking at what proper, well-made modern windows can do, and he doesn't even consider gas-filled triple-glazing (standard in Scandanavia). Makes a hell of a difference in colder climates. The other thing is that the frame assembly is just as important as the panes, and some old windows have quality frames and some... do not.
     
  18. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

    Messages:
    9,601
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Location:
    The Old North State
    I agree. He did use a cheap comparison window, but I think if you looked at the volume of window replacements in the US, I'm guessing these cheap vinyl windows are by far the leader. I hear radio ads all the time for <$99 windows.
     
  19. DaveCPA

    DaveCPA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    91
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2017
    2600 sq ft house painted inside - 4 BR, 3 BA - $4500-$5000

    Retile 40 sqft bathroom (just the room with the toilet and shower), tear out tub, replace with tile shower - $3000

    What do you guys think about these quotes?
     
  20. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

    Messages:
    9,601
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Location:
    The Old North State
    Does that include materials? How much trim work is there for painting? Where are you located?

    The bathroom seems high. Just ask the guy how much time it is going to take. Then you can back of the envelope the labor rate. If you get $100/hr for a painter, it is too high. If you get $100/hr for a tile guy, it is too high.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by