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The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    Location:
    The Old North State
    Let me just say, gutters may be the most marked up thing ever (except maybe HVAC equipment). We had seamless gutters put on our house when we re-sided, and the siding contractor gave us them at his cost. He just gave me the bill the gutter guys gave him. Our house was a bit bigger than that plus a detached two car garage. Off the top of my head, it was <$600 total.
     
  2. djblisk

    djblisk Senior member

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    Nov 25, 2006
    

    Damn.
     
  3. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    Just pulled up the invoice:

    73' of gutters, 50' of downspouts 25' of flashing and two splash guards for <$600.
     
  4. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    Location:
    VA
    

    LOL. Ha ha. Are they made of gold?

    What brokencycle quoted.

    Contractors are worse than they were in '06.

    My addition was approx 60ft of gutters and I paid $470.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
  5. js4design

    js4design Senior member

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    Dec 8, 2008
    Location:
    Tidewater, VA
    

    No, they are aluminum. He said it right there.
     
    4 people like this.
  6. JohnGalt

    JohnGalt Senior member

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    Feb 27, 2009
    Location:
    Ouray, CO
    Our first relatively calm night after moving in earlier this week. Temperatures dropped quite a bit and the gas starter on the fireplace is fantastic.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Senior member

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    Los Angeles
    

    Don't rob idfnl of his chance to talk about how others are getting ripped off and he did it much better.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
    4 people like this.
  8. Dar FTW

    Dar FTW Senior member

    Messages:
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    Jul 5, 2010
    after finishing a basement renovation in which we added a mother in law apartment, i feel like i'm at a crossroads. i'm 30 years old and have little to no experience with home ownership (bought the house 1 year ago) and renovating other than what i learned by following people around asking questions as they were working on our house. lucked out too because some of my in-laws are carpenters. I'm at a crossroads because I like learning new things, don't mind hard work but as we consider doing more renovations throughout the home I don't know if its worth learning. Besides the fear of fucking things up doing it myself, I know financially it makes sense for me to pay people to work rather than take time off.

    has anyone gotten a lot of satisfaction learning this stuff at my age? could use some advise here.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    Apr 6, 2008
    Location:
    The Brooklyn of Seattle
    

    I'm 32 and we bought our house when I was 28.

    What do you have in mind to do? It's definitely worth learning a few things, as small things come up frequently that need attention, and it's difficult and very costly to hire someone to do small jobs. It's also satisfying to me to be able to handle small things right away.

    Things I think are worth learning/possibly doing yourself:

    Painting
    Cutting/installing basic trim, for example, door casings
    Basic drywall repair/patching
    How to replace electrical fixtures (sockets, switches, ceiling lights)
    Basic plumbing repairs (how to repair the type of pipe you have, how to replace fixtures)

    Youtube is your friend.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2017
    2 people like this.
  10. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    The Brooklyn of Seattle
    The major roadblock to doing all of those things is building up the stock of tools needed and having a place to keep them all. It's a great day when you finally set out to do a project and realize that you can just do it and don't need to make a trip (or three) to the hardware store to get parts/tools.

    Also, if you have a non-blue or orange hardware store near you, consider going there for moving parts - nuts/bolts, fittings, ducting elbows etc.
    It's been my experience that anything which has to fit closely together or be adjusted/moved during installation will go together much more easily if not bought from a big box store. It will be cheaper there, but the aggravation of trying to use materials that don't work the way they should is not worth it.
     
  11. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Senior member

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    [​IMG]
     
  12. djblisk

    djblisk Senior member

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    Fuck me.

    I forgot that I had a home warranty with the purchase of my house. The water heater failed and I paid $1375 to get a new one installed before I figured out I even had a home warranty and that it covers replacing a water heater up to $1500. They won't reimburse me because did not file protocol and file a claim with them first. I hate wasting money. Such an idiot.
     
  13. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    VA
    

    You got ripped off and I could have done much better
     
    2 people like this.
  14. djblisk

    djblisk Senior member

    Messages:
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    Nov 25, 2006
    

    Cost money to not a lift a proverbial finger I guess
     
    2 people like this.
  15. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

    Messages:
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    Apr 18, 2008
    The younger you are when you learn to do something, the longer you have to use that skill and the better the investment turned out to be. Likewise with buying tools. Personally I really enjoy learning new things, so that's part of the calculus for me.

    That being said, the first time you do something is always the most expensive in terms of time and investment in tools and materials and so forth. Plus, money is worth more to you when you're young. I wouldn't take time off from work to work on my house, especially if it really did make financial sense to pay someone to do it (if you've factored in the lifetime benefit of learning things plus the fun if this sort of thing is fun for you).
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2017
    4 people like this.
  16. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Senior member

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    Los Angeles
    You could always just hire the guy and then if he's cool, ask questions and learn from him. (I don't think he'd be opposed to it as you're already paying him)
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2017
  17. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    

    This is a given and really doesn't need to be said at this point in the thread.
     
  18. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    Location:
    VA
    Went to a small party with wife's friends tonight. Nice family.

    But then I looked at the fireplace and I saw a Duraflame fire log sitting there like a piece of burning elephant shit. I only gave him 1/2 the cuck points because at least the fireplace was real, and like I said, nice family.

    At one point my wife sat in front to warm up. On the way home she said it wasn't very warm and was glad we had a wood stove.

    I was like....


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2017
    1 person likes this.
  19. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
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    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    The best thing you can do is intensely research your projects before starting them, which will avoid the hassle of stopping constantly to buy things and avoid blunders which sap confidence and consume additional time.

    I do this regularly and plan my projects extensively, i plan a budget and buy everything I expect to need including specialty tools before beginning the work.
     
    1 person likes this.
  20. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    Words to apply to your entire life
     
    1 person likes this.

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